Changing Your Own Oil - Tools & Tips - BMW K1600 Forum : BMW K1600 GT and GTL Forums
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Old 07-08-2012, 12:59 PM   #1
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Default Changing Your Own Oil - Tools & Tips

I have received a number of requests for more information about changing your own oil. In reality, it is easy to do, and can save yourself a lot of money. Besides, you can use better quality oil when you do it yourself. There is also a certain level of bonding that occurs (for me anyway).

Here are the tools required.





Here is what the parts inside the bike look like:





While many here have a motorcycle lift, I just place the bike on the center stand and lay a big piece of cardboard on the ground on the righthand side of the bike.





With the drain pan located on the left side of the bike, I reach under and loosen the 8mm sump drain plug just a little.

Then, remove the socket driver and use the 8mm socket to remove the plug with the pan below ready to receive about a gallon of oil very fast.



Let this oil drain long enough to where there are but slow drops falling.

Next reach up inside the sump about 3" with a 5mm Allen wrench, feeling your way inside the small crankcase oil plug.



This is the tool my dealer uses.



Carefully loosen and remove the plug straight down without dropping it.


(Note how clean the oil is. That oil had maybe 20 miles on it. All part of the break-in ritual.)

If this plug falls off the end of the 5mm Allen wrench/socket, you will need to fish around inside the sump with a magnet to locate and extract it.

Allow the oil to all drain. There is about one quart in the crankcase.

Next move over to the oil filter on the other side of the bike. I do this while the rest of the oil drains through the plug openings.

I use heavy duty aluminum foil to protect the exhaust and form a drain path below the oil filter. This makes clean-up very easy.

The dealer used a rag and cardboard.





Carefully clean the area around the edge, where the oil filter gasket seats to the engine.

Lubricate the new oil filter gasket with a drop of oil on your finger.



Install the new oil filter and torque to 11 NM. This seems like it is loose, but it is the correct torque.

Replace the 5mm crankcase oil plug carefully and torque to 12 NM.

N.B.: There is no washer or gasket with the crankcase plug. The proper torque will be met with very little pressure.

Clean the sump plug opening well. Replace the crush washer on the sump oil plug with a new one. Clean any metal from the sump oil plug magnet. Replace the sump plug and torque to 28 NM.

N.B.: When you are tightening the sump plug with a new crush washer, you will "feel" the washer seat as you tighten it. I torque the plug a few times to be certain that the seating occurs, and that the proper torque has been met.

Add 4 quarts of oil to the dip stick opening. I use a paper funnel to make it easier, then throw away the funnel.

N.B.: 4 quarts will fill the sump to almost flowing out of the dip stick opening. This is why the last quart is added after running the engine.



I get them here:
Paper Refill Funnels, 50 Count - Griot's Garage

Insert and tighten the dip stick.

Start the engine and run the engine for 30 seconds to a minute. This pumps the new oil through the oil filter and fills the crankcase, making room for you to top off the oil level.

Stop the engine, remove the dip stick and add the last 3/4 to 1 quart of oil.

N.B.: There is a discussion about the exact amount to ad after an oil change. The Owners Manual says 4.5 liters, or 4.755 US quarts. My dealer told me they use 5 quarts, so that is what I have done. I don't think that the exact volume is critical because this is a sump design. The crankcase volume is critical because of the splashing needed to cool and lubricate. That crankcase volume is set by the design and constant regardless of the sump volume. I let my engine drain a long time, and rock the bike on the center stand to get out every bit I can.

N.B.: You can't get a correct oil level measurement unless the engine is at full operating temperature, as evidenced by the cooling fan being on. You then shut off the engine and wait 60 seconds before taking the oil level measurement with the bike on level land and on the center stand.
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Old 07-08-2012, 01:10 PM   #2
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Thanks RL. Planning my first change this week.
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Old 07-08-2012, 01:16 PM   #3
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As most here know, I have changed my oil numerous times since the bike came home from the dealer. Part of my elaborate break-in ritual.

I found that laying on the floor, carefully removing the 5mm crankcase oil plug to be more error prone than I cared for. So, you will find a thread where I went through lengthy discussions about a better kind of crankcase oil plug BMW could have used. I made several modifications to a BMW plug, and offered a couple versions to forum members.

Here is a photo of the three main oil plug versions, and the tools required to remove them.



The center modified oil plug worked perfect. That was until two different BMW mechanics decided to be ham fisted when installing the plug back into the crankcase. They over torqued the plug, twisting it out of shape like a corkscrew. When they next tried to remove the plug the Allen key broke off.

That is when I created the last version of my oil plug. One made from a tool steel socket drive metric plug and a 10mm socket welded together. (The socket is cut down in a lathe to be the correct length before welding.) This latest version is BMW mechanic proof because it is several times stronger than the threads of the crankcase.

I like this design best because I use a 1/4" socket extension to remove the new plug. The socket extension locks into place, just like any other socket onto a socket wrench. That way either removing the crankcase plug, or reinstalling it, the plug can't go anywhere, it is secured.

Now, there is no more anxiety about dropping the 5mm crankcase oil plug.

There is also no more concern about allowing a BMW mechanic touch the plug.
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Old 07-08-2012, 06:02 PM   #4
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Great info, Robert.

For the inner oil plug, I use an extended 5mm allen socket. Never had any issue with it.

You can get them at Sears, Grainger, or any place that sells a decent variety of tools. For this application, I prefer the ones without the ball end, as you're gong straight in and the square end gives a bit more purchase and stability.

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Old 07-09-2012, 04:25 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RL Lemke View Post
There is also a certain level of bonding that occurs (for me anyway).
Nice write-up RL. I always enjoy how you go the extra mile - or two!
I have the first version of the modified plug and it works well. Since I'll be handling all the oil changes there's no issue with over-torquing.

And I too, enjoy working on the bike. Even in a 100 degree garage. It's what I've always called my therapy.
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:40 PM   #6
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How do you clear the sevice due code to turn out the reminder light?
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Old 07-09-2012, 04:52 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by behrler View Post
How do you clear the service due code to turn out the reminder light?
I have that done when I get new tires. Since I change my oil and tires at the end of each big ride, it works out well. Besides, I have an ability to ignore dash codes.

I posted the cost for the connection to the mother ship and code clearing somewhere else here. I think it was about $20.
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:04 PM   #8
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You can see in the photo below how there are four side streams of oil around the main oil flow. This is due to the four upright forks which are to act as guides for the crankcase oil plug. Forks that could go a lot higher than they do. One time while changing the oil I twitched a bit as I removed my first modified crankcase oil plug. This allowed the flat part of the plug to catch on the top of one of the forks, pulling it off the socket.

Thankfully, the design worked as planned and the Allen key extension pulled the plug straight down into the center of the forks. With my little finger I was able to move the Allen key end and the plug fell through the sump drain opening.

There are two guys on this forum who have dropped their stock BMW crankcase oil plugs while removing them. Fortunately each was able to fish around in the sump and retrieve the plug with a wand mounted magnet.

I don't know about you, but sometimes while laying on the floor, messing with everything needed to drain the hot oil into a pan which is only leaves a couple inches to work between, a twitch or fumble can happen. I like having a crankcase oil plug that has no choice but to follow my hand. By having the 1/4" drive extension locked onto the plug, there is zero change of losing it.



I have no interest in balancing an oil plug on the top of an Allen key after having done it five times. I have better things to do than to try and retrieve a plug with a magnet, or worse yet, haul the bike to the dealer to have the sump removed to find the loose plug.
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Old 07-09-2012, 05:55 PM   #9
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Here is a close-up of the sump cutaway.

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Old 07-09-2012, 06:08 PM   #10
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The other easy thing to do while changing the oil is the final drive gear oil change.

This is covered well enough here:

http://www.k1600forum.com/forum/36725-post28.html

This is the entire thread:

Final Drive Fluid Change

The key thing is to buy a hair color bottle from the beauty supply store before you attempt this service.

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