Tesla Cybertruck Hellcat: Love it or hate it, police won't see it. - BMW K1600 Forum : BMW K1600 GT and GTL Forums
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post #1 of 29 Old 11-30-2019, 06:59 PM Thread Starter
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Tesla Cybertruck Hellcat: Love it or hate it, police won't see it.

In the military I was in electronic warfare; meaning my role was to listen for threat emitters and evaluate their impact, etc. I also worked on the B1 in Palmdale.

Like it or hate it, this pickup should not be seen by radar, and likely not by LIDAR (except shined directly on the headlights or license plate). This bitch is stealth.

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post #2 of 29 Old 11-30-2019, 07:26 PM
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Where’s the bed, which is kinda important for a truck?

Agreed, if it’s stealth the cops won’t like it. But it’s gotta get into consumers hands before that’s going to be an issue. I predict it will have significant changes before it makes it to market. I mean IF it makes it to market...
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post #3 of 29 Old 11-30-2019, 09:44 PM
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This thing has me very tempted:



"Tesla calls the Cybertruck’s bed its “Vault,” mainly because it has a slide-down tonneau cover that can safely lock away whatever you stow in there. More important to truck enthusiasts, though, is just how much capacity the bed has.

It’s 6.5 feet long, and is rated for more than 3,500 pounds. There’s a handy under-bed storage area, too, to keep things like tools from rattling around as you drive. As with Tesla’s other models, there’s a front trunk – or “frunk” – with more space; the Cybertruck also adds extra capacity in the buttress-like sail pillars.
Altogether you’re looking at 100 cubic feet of exterior space. Items in the bed can be charged up, too, via 110/240V outlets. Inside, meanwhile, the rear seats lift up to reveal more room for cargo."


https://www.slashgear.com/tesla-cybe...bers-22601156/
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post #4 of 29 Old 12-01-2019, 08:12 AM
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no spare tyre then !

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post #5 of 29 Old 12-01-2019, 09:09 AM
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Some politician will learn this and demand that they have discrete transponders installed so that speed can be measured remotely. You can't have that kind of capability here in the land of the free.
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post #6 of 29 Old 12-01-2019, 09:20 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by djfalkenstein View Post
In the military I was in electronic warfare; meaning my role was to listen for threat emitters and evaluate their impact, etc. I also worked on the B1 in Palmdale.

Like it or hate it, this pickup should not be seen by radar, and likely not by LIDAR (except shined directly on the headlights or license plate). This bitch is stealth.

Better get out your radar absorbing or diffusing paint. The design itself isn't that much more stealthy than the average car and potentially less so (that giant front facing metal 'bumper' below the light strip. A bunch of angles isn't going to be that much more effective than a bunch of curves except at a distance or head on, which is why, among many other reasons, newer stealth fighters have far fewer flat angle planes. What typically kills you in a car are your license plate and headlight buckets, both of which are by design, good reflectors.

As an aside, I wonder if there is an actual law about license plates or just a description of one. I found out running my first company that there was no legal definition of a 'cheque' so we all wrote our paychecks on whatever we had laying around. Every week we took in a variety of different scraps of paper with our account numbers on them. The bank fought it at first but eventually they got into it as well and looked forward to our creativity, right up and until the day that I brought in a banana skin and my partner brought in a balloon. License plates, if there is no 'standard' by legal definition just means a group of letters and numbers on something that approximates the size of a license plate. I do not believe it has to be an actual, typical metal license plate so you could, in theory, just paint your license plate ID onto a sheet of plastic thereby killing its radar cross section..

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post #7 of 29 Old 12-01-2019, 09:40 AM
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Originally Posted by FirstBMWfirstBagger View Post
This thing has me very tempted:



"Tesla calls the Cybertruck’s bed its “Vault,” mainly because it has a slide-down tonneau cover that can safely lock away whatever you stow in there. More important to truck enthusiasts, though, is just how much capacity the bed has.

It’s 6.5 feet long, and is rated for more than 3,500 pounds. There’s a handy under-bed storage area, too, to keep things like tools from rattling around as you drive. As with Tesla’s other models, there’s a front trunk – or “frunk” – with more space; the Cybertruck also adds extra capacity in the buttress-like sail pillars.
Altogether you’re looking at 100 cubic feet of exterior space. Items in the bed can be charged up, too, via 110/240V outlets. Inside, meanwhile, the rear seats lift up to reveal more room for cargo."


https://www.slashgear.com/tesla-cybe...bers-22601156/


Lot of stats and details about the storage areas without pics. Sounds like a fairytale. I would never put my business in the hands of an unproven EV. The only thing they’re good for is commuting between known distances.

Maybe someday when battery production and even more importantly, the production of electricity can support the required infrastructure. Even nuclear reactors produce undesirable waste. Wind energy? Drive through the Mojave and imagine that in your neighborhood.


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post #8 of 29 Old 12-01-2019, 09:46 AM
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When people need a truck this thing will fail as a truck. Range while hauling or towing will kill it. For those using it as a commuter vehicle and willing to crawl into Voltron every morning it will probably do well (in that niche). It will probably also do well as a contractor shuttle, you know, that guy that shows up at all the job sites but never really does any work. What it really did is sent a shot across the bow of Ford telling them 'you can do better with better materials and out of the box thinking'.
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post #9 of 29 Old 12-01-2019, 09:59 AM
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Not to burst any green bubbles here, but personally I think electric vehicles are a scam, and so is Elon Musk. The premise of electric vehicles is to save us from Global warming, which is another argument altogether, but I think it fails miserably at that goal. Each electric vehicle requires the strip mining of 20 acres of land to get the ore's required just for that battery. All the machinery involved in that mining is diesel powered. Next is the warped thought process that somehow the electricity needed to charge the batteries in the truck comes from thin air. Of course, it does not, the overwhelming majority of electricity is produced burning fossil fuels, which means this entire exercise moves emissions from tailpipes to power plant stacks. Lastly, all the reading I've done regarding end of life cycle for these batteries is an ecological nightmare. I just don't see it.
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post #10 of 29 Old 12-01-2019, 10:26 AM
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Originally Posted by Northsquad View Post
Not to burst any green bubbles here, but personally I think electric vehicles are a scam, and so is Elon Musk. The premise of electric vehicles is to save us from Global warming, which is another argument altogether, but I think it fails miserably at that goal. Each electric vehicle requires the strip mining of 20 acres of land to get the ore's required just for that battery. All the machinery involved in that mining is diesel powered. Next is the warped thought process that somehow the electricity needed to charge the batteries in the truck comes from thin air. Of course, it does not, the overwhelming majority of electricity is produced burning fossil fuels, which means this entire exercise moves emissions from tailpipes to power plant stacks. Lastly, all the reading I've done regarding end of life cycle for these batteries is an ecological nightmare. I just don't see it.
I agree. I won’t have an electric vehicle in my garage. And Global Warming was dubunked, so they changed the name to “Climate Change”. Convenient. Of course the climate is changing; it always will be whether humans occupy earth, or not. Planet Earth has been in existence for they tell us billions of years, and we have weather data for the last 100 or so years, and they think they see a pattern? Whatever.

How about forest fires? Nowadays, when there is a forest fire we fight it with water bombers and feet on the ground with water and suppressing agent. For billions of years, forest fires burned and burned and burned until nature put them out with rain, or they burnt the earth until there was nothing left to burn, since remember, all continents were at one time joined. There is a lot of carbon in forest fire smoke. Perhaps carbon emissions were higher before the industrial revolution? No one knows.

I think electric vehicles will catch on for a lot of people, make a lot of money for some sectors (the real reason behind the climate change propaganda), then people will wisen up and hydrogen fuel cells will prevail as the long-term solution to fewer emissions.

And a few people in North America switching to electric vehicles won’t help curb global emissions; China and India is where the real problem lays with regard to emissions and GHG, and they don’t appear to buy into the green movement. Last time I checked, GHGs don’t stay within the confines of China & India’s borders.

Just my $0.02.
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