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hi anyone using a k/n filter,
used them on all of my old bikes so not expecting turbo performance but is the induction noise noticeable,as in noisier ?
 

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Mr.Fix It
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I've always used them on my street machines. A K&N filter for a K bike is about $45.00; that's cheaper than the stock on from BMW.

But stand-by for the naysayers that will tell you it's a wrong/bad to use a K&N filter and they'll list all these reasons/references. But none of them will tell you that ALL the negatives WRT to K&N filters on motorcycles are related to off-road/dirt motorcycles.

Duane
 

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Mr.Fix It
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Duplicate post.

Duane
 

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Mr.Fix It
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Yes, the induction is louder at high RPM.

Duane
 
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I've had a reusable KN on my bike since the first service. Cant say I've ever noticed more noise. I clean it every oil change.
 

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After several years of cleaning the stock filter, using low pressure compressed air, I installed a K&N filter on my 2012 bike. I've been blowing out the stock filter on my current 2016 bike once a year and have a K&N filter sitting on the shelf for that day the stock one begins to shred. To each his own.
 
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Mr.Fix It
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@tailscookieiron , refer you to re-read my post #2. :) The naysayers out there but have no data, just conjecture.

Duane
 
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I have no beef with K&N filters and use their oil filters on my two cars.

What I don't swallow is the sales garb and performance gains, and in the case of air filters I prefer not to use the type that require oil.

Filter Re-Oiling Amount0.63 oz (19 ml)



146558
 

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You might see a slight sound difference, probably won’t be enormous though. I still use a K&N on my muscle car, but I haven’t bothered with the K, and I definitely won’t on the Jeep. There is a possible (maybe even likely, depending on the vehicle) performance benefit in allowing more air flow, but you really can’t improve airflow through a screen type filter of the same size without allowing more particulates through, that simply defies the laws of physics. Whether enough junk is getting through to cause damage (and how much damage) is the real question, and nobody seems to have that answer. Lots of anecdotal evidence out there though. I say run one if you want, there’s probably not a huge difference either way
 

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Mr.Fix It
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@Rick92040 , Oh yes, I saw your post. I expected to see something like that. I don't know much about the author. But I do know about real life use/experience, mine.

Duane
 

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but you really can’t improve airflow through a screen type filter of the same size without allowing more particulates through, that simply defies the laws of physics.
One way to achieved that is by increasing the total area of the filter material, and to fit the element in the same housing the manufacturers achieve this by additional pleats - this comment is made based on my general knowledge of filters and not based on my limited knowledge of how K&N achieve the lower filter differential (DP).

The K&N air filters discussed here aren't "screen type" - the screen is only to support the cotton filter material.

  • Pleated media provides a large filtration area offering long service intervals
  • Multiple layers of woven cotton gauze media offers excellent filtration
 

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@Rick92040 , Oh yes, I saw your post. I expected to see something like that. I don't know much about the author. But I do know about real life use/experience, mine.

Duane
If you read his link, you can see that the filter efficiency difference between a KN and the best OEM one is about 3%. They scale the graph such it looks like it's this huge thing but it's hardly worth getting worried over IMO. The big difference is in load capacity. The KNs will need to be cleaned more often which is what I do on a regular basis, especially here in Arizona. If you live somewhere less dusty, you can probably just follow the regular service interval.
 

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One way to achieved that is by increasing the total area of the filter material, and to fit the element in the same housing the manufacturers achieve this by additional pleats - this comment is made based on my general knowledge of filters and not based on my limited knowledge of how K&N achieve the lower filter differential (DP).

The K&N air filters discussed here aren't "screen type" - the screen is only to support the cotton filter material.

  • Pleated media provides a large filtration area offering long service intervals
  • Multiple layers of woven cotton gauze media offers excellent filtration
Yes, I know K&N’s don’t use the metal screen for anything other than holding the cotton in place. When I referred to a screen type filter, I was referring to any paper/gauze/foam/whatever type filter. I only used screen to differentiate them from say, an oil bath or some other exotic type of filter. And you’re also correct in that adding pleats increases filtration, it also restricts flow. If you look at most stock paper units, you’ll usually see plenty of pleats. My point was that for a given filter size on a given engine, airflow and filtration have essentially an inverse relationship. some materials may differ slightly, but generally, the better the flow, the more particulates get though. As I said earlier, whether it’s actually enough to damage a motor or not, who knows? i certainly don’t, and I may eventually put one on the bike, it’s just not a priority at the moment
 

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And you’re also correct in that adding pleats increases filtration, it also restricts flow. If you look at most stock paper units, you’ll usually see plenty of pleats.
No, that's not what I said, .....to increase flow while maintaining the same filtration efficiency the manufacturer increases the total surface area of the filtration medium, and to achieve that in the same space available they increase the number of pleats.
Alternate filtration medium is another method.

Also, the K&N air filters improve their filtration efficiency by wetting their filter medium with oil.

I've read the link posting in this thread a number of times and it comes across as an opinion piece and not an independent unbiased test.

I'll repeat, I have no intention of using a K&N air filter in my K1600, but that is a personal preference not based on engineering facts (I'm an engineer in the power industry and do get involved in product performance testing).
 

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the manufacturer increases the total surface area of the filtration medium, and to achieve that in the same space available they increase the number of pleats.
Does a K&N usually have more pleats than a paper filter though? I’ve owned several, and I can’t say I’ve ever noticed this. They very well could in some applications of course, I may not have caught it with mine. Paper filters usually have a sh*t ton of them
 

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Does a K&N usually have more pleats than a paper filter though? I’ve owned several, and I can’t say I’ve ever noticed this. They very well could in some applications of course, I may not have caught it with mine. Paper filters usually have a sh*t ton of them
That leads to my other comments.

Alternate filtration medium is another method.

Also, the K&N air filters improve their filtration efficiency by wetting their filter medium with oil.
This is much the same as the oil threads on such forums, and I'm not keen on getting into the direction that they typically go, so I'll rather bow out now - I have no skin in this game, I chose not to use K&N air filters, so not attempting to swing it either way, just tried to add thoughts to consider for others when making their choice.
 
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