BMW K1600 Forum banner

61 - 80 of 110 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
647 Posts
The thing is that for many of us they do. I've owned three BMWs now and my friends have owned them. I've had two boxers and not this big thing. The boxers were bulletproof and I rode them really hard. So far this bike has also been trouble free. But no one manufacturer has a perfect track record. These bikes are ever more complicated and that means more things that will break.

The trouble with forums is that you only see the bad. And BMW isn't going to submit a defect rate publicly so we don't know how many of our bikes have major (or minor issues).

I agree that their main goal should be to produce a bike worthy of the cost.

james
I think James hit the essence of K16 ownership and forum life. Owners post what they're passionate about, and "bad" is usually high on the list. I'm personally guilty. I've done my share of bellyaching about engine issues. But I don't believe what I've experienced is normal. I believe I'm in the minority, but the minority bitch the loudest, giving the impression that the K16 sky is falling. For every "me", I'm sure there are dozens who have almost no issues. Focusing on the positive, my experience is that BMW steps up to the plate in most cases. It's irritating that their cupboard is sometimes bare when it comes to key parts, and Mothership attitude towards customers could use an improvement, but they mostly come through. I'm not ready to throw in the BMW towel yet.
 

·
Truly Gritty
Joined
·
32 Posts
Well I have to jump in say this: Just about every manufacturer of vehicles will provide an extended warranty that you can buy from the manufacturer. Not so with BMW, you have to buy a third party extended warranty. Makes me/you wonder how much faith BMW has in it's own product. And probably the GT I have now will be the last BMW I will own. I simply love the bike, can't say a negative remark .... well except for the seat . The third party extended warranty my dealer has isn't worth the paper it's written on. One example, the most they'll pay for an engine problem is $5,000, that won't buy a short block never mind the labor to install it. I've owned my GT for 6 months and already clocked 15,000 miles so as you can see sometime next summer I'll have run out of the original warranty. I could roll the dice and keep it but if a major break occurs then what. I've asked before what extended warranty programs you guys are using and how do you like the coverage and response from the warranty company but, to no avail and I got no responses. I'd really like to keep riding this bike but, without a good extended warranty it would be like jumping out of a plane without a parachute and expecting to land safely.
Max BMW recommended Pinnacle to me for my extended coverage. They like Pinnacle because they don't have any problems with getting Pinnacle to pony up for warranty claims. I suggest you ask the dealership you frequent for their recommendation and it should be whoever they have the least problem with getting to honor a warranty claim.
 

·
International Man of Mystery
Joined
·
3,285 Posts
I had 4 of them by now. read through one of my recent threads and find out what went kaput during 120.000 km of ownership. No coincidence or the famous outlier.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
36 Posts
i am now on my 7th k1600gt
as bikes are getting like a laptop on wheels i'm not surprised things are getting worse
that saying when the last k16 gearbox came out i was not sure about it
a a engineer of 40 years plus putting so much in the same space something has to give
that saying the 1st bike reverse pack in at 3 MILES never even got out my garage
bike was replace straight away as i was about to go touring a week later the replacement bike at 730 MILES
gearbox jammed in 5th&6th mine was one of the 1st to pack in
the latest bike is in as i type its switching it self of
i have to agree the k1600 is getting wers
i did not want a lone bike as no k1600 where available
AND THIS IS THE POINT i am using my mates 2012 k1600gt that's done 75000 miles and never missed a beate
the problem is when acontants get involved something has to give
and you buy a bike to ride and not to sit down at your local dealer to drink coffee
well that MY take on the mater stay safe and remember other people are without food
so count yourself lucky you can afford a bike
 

·
KBiK
Joined
·
1,472 Posts
Never had a problem with my extended warranty. I bought it through my dealer. The service manager always deals with them and everything that has gone wrong with the bike has been covered by the warranty.
 
  • Like
Reactions: J-Luv and Gunnert

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
15 years spread over 5 BMW bikes. R1200 C Montauk, R1200RT, 2x 1200 GSAs, and the current 17+ K1600 GT.

No more.

In 26000 kms (current mileage on my bike) I've experienced 3 satnav replacements, 1 gearbox replacement, and currently a hard to diagnose / fix gearshift pro failure.

Every few months, my bike spends time in the shop. This morning I went in with my bike in, the dealer thought replacing the sensor will fix the gearshift pro - it didn't, now they have to tear it down and fix it and they have no idea when I will have my bike back. Again. Less than a few months after being left without a bike due to the ridiculous gearbox recall which turned into a full gearbox replacement, that left me stranded for months.

I received a high amount of bashing on this forum, after posting about my gearbox problems (enough to ask forum moderators to delete my own multipage thread). The opinion that BMW was becoming a Sunday afternoon bike, meant for low-mileage, high margins, garage queen / trophy status, more than a daily / real life vehicle was the one that proved the most troublesome, for most forum members, here.

Well, reality is once again beyond internet wisdom. Today my BMW fanboy days are officially over. I've stood behind the brand and the bikes for so long, but the BMW transition from a "true, long distance bike" to a marketing hyped pile of fluff is now complete. Marketing has killed the product and the brand. A stranded BMW biker is no longer a rare occurence and it doesn't get a network of corporate pressured dealers to lose any sleep on how to get the rider back on the road asap. I've seen this both in the UK and Romania, across multiple dealers. Corporate HQ is non-existent in the relationship with customers, and they are incredibly disconnected from any form of deep / real responsibility for their product and service.

German top engineering and reliability is, as things currently stand, sorry ... a joke. And with BMW customers obsessing only over which display is better on their 2-3 years, 15-20k miles scheduled upgrade, there is no real pressure to change anything fundamental from the way BMW is doing business. They keep churning out unending iterations of gadget filled machines that are nothing more than disposable, expensive, toys.

Well, sorry, I don't want to play this game anymore. Too rich for my blood, too much mindless consumerism fuelling corporate irresponsibility. My time and money are no longer going to fuel this mess. Feel free to make your own choices - but for me it ends, today.
Very sorry to hear of the problems you are having. Nothing worse than being unsure and getting stuck with a problem. I've had 2 - K1600 over the past 6 years (a lot of miles laid down) and have had zero issues. Hopefully, your next ride is without any issues whatsoever. Cheers!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
15 years spread over 5 BMW bikes. R1200 C Montauk, R1200RT, 2x 1200 GSAs, and the current 17+ K1600 GT.

No more.

In 26000 kms (current mileage on my bike) I've experienced 3 satnav replacements, 1 gearbox replacement, and currently a hard to diagnose / fix gearshift pro failure.

Every few months, my bike spends time in the shop. This morning I went in with my bike in, the dealer thought replacing the sensor will fix the gearshift pro - it didn't, now they have to tear it down and fix it and they have no idea when I will have my bike back. Again. Less than a few months after being left without a bike due to the ridiculous gearbox recall which turned into a full gearbox replacement, that left me stranded for months.

I received a high amount of bashing on this forum, after posting about my gearbox problems (enough to ask forum moderators to delete my own multipage thread). The opinion that BMW was becoming a Sunday afternoon bike, meant for low-mileage, high margins, garage queen / trophy status, more than a daily / real life vehicle was the one that proved the most troublesome, for most forum members, here.

Well, reality is once again beyond internet wisdom. Today my BMW fanboy days are officially over. I've stood behind the brand and the bikes for so long, but the BMW transition from a "true, long distance bike" to a marketing hyped pile of fluff is now complete. Marketing has killed the product and the brand. A stranded BMW biker is no longer a rare occurence and it doesn't get a network of corporate pressured dealers to lose any sleep on how to get the rider back on the road asap. I've seen this both in the UK and Romania, across multiple dealers. Corporate HQ is non-existent in the relationship with customers, and they are incredibly disconnected from any form of deep / real responsibility for their product and service.

German top engineering and reliability is, as things currently stand, sorry ... a joke. And with BMW customers obsessing only over which display is better on their 2-3 years, 15-20k miles scheduled upgrade, there is no real pressure to change anything fundamental from the way BMW is doing business. They keep churning out unending iterations of gadget filled machines that are nothing more than disposable, expensive, toys.

Well, sorry, I don't want to play this game anymore. Too rich for my blood, too much mindless consumerism fuelling corporate irresponsibility. My time and money are no longer going to fuel this mess. Feel free to make your own choices - but for me it ends, today.
if you liked the 1200 GSA, take a look at the Triumph Tiger 1200. I loved it, and it was incredibly nimble.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
246 Posts
15 years spread over 5 BMW bikes. R1200 C Montauk, R1200RT, 2x 1200 GSAs, and the current 17+ K1600 GT.

No more.

In 26000 kms (current mileage on my bike) I've experienced 3 satnav replacements, 1 gearbox replacement, and currently a hard to diagnose / fix gearshift pro failure.

Every few months, my bike spends time in the shop. This morning I went in with my bike in, the dealer thought replacing the sensor will fix the gearshift pro - it didn't, now they have to tear it down and fix it and they have no idea when I will have my bike back. Again. Less than a few months after being left without a bike due to the ridiculous gearbox recall which turned into a full gearbox replacement, that left me stranded for months.

I received a high amount of bashing on this forum, after posting about my gearbox problems (enough to ask forum moderators to delete my own multipage thread). The opinion that BMW was becoming a Sunday afternoon bike, meant for low-mileage, high margins, garage queen / trophy status, more than a daily / real life vehicle was the one that proved the most troublesome, for most forum members, here.

Well, reality is once again beyond internet wisdom. Today my BMW fanboy days are officially over. I've stood behind the brand and the bikes for so long, but the BMW transition from a "true, long distance bike" to a marketing hyped pile of fluff is now complete. Marketing has killed the product and the brand. A stranded BMW biker is no longer a rare occurence and it doesn't get a network of corporate pressured dealers to lose any sleep on how to get the rider back on the road asap. I've seen this both in the UK and Romania, across multiple dealers. Corporate HQ is non-existent in the relationship with customers, and they are incredibly disconnected from any form of deep / real responsibility for their product and service.

German top engineering and reliability is, as things currently stand, sorry ... a joke. And with BMW customers obsessing only over which display is better on their 2-3 years, 15-20k miles scheduled upgrade, there is no real pressure to change anything fundamental from the way BMW is doing business. They keep churning out unending iterations of gadget filled machines that are nothing more than disposable, expensive, toys.

Well, sorry, I don't want to play this game anymore. Too rich for my blood, too much mindless consumerism fuelling corporate irresponsibility. My time and money are no longer going to fuel this mess. Feel free to make your own choices - but for me it ends, today.
"German top engineering and reliability is, as things currently stand, sorry ... a joke."

I feel for ya. BUT, German, reliability? German means whizzbang. If you want reliable engineering that works well, time after time, and with practical forethought, get a Japanese product, specifically a Honda or Toyota. You must be European. No one who can afford it in the USA drives a German anything once the warranty expires, if they need to depend on it. And what they drive in the US are the German vehicles with ALL the whizzbangs, biggest engines, and all the stuff that few European German cars get delivered with. German vehicles are for passion, not reliability, even after the warranty expires, like mine. I can afford to get it fixed, although so far I have lucked out.
Really, nothing German is reliable forever, get a Toyota or Honda if that is your goal.
Aber, Glück auf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
15 years spread over 5 BMW bikes. R1200 C Montauk, R1200RT, 2x 1200 GSAs, and the current 17+ K1600 GT.

No more.

In 26000 kms (current mileage on my bike) I've experienced 3 satnav replacements, 1 gearbox replacement, and currently a hard to diagnose / fix gearshift pro failure.

Every few months, my bike spends time in the shop. This morning I went in with my bike in, the dealer thought replacing the sensor will fix the gearshift pro - it didn't, now they have to tear it down and fix it and they have no idea when I will have my bike back. Again. Less than a few months after being left without a bike due to the ridiculous gearbox recall which turned into a full gearbox replacement, that left me stranded for months.

I received a high amount of bashing on this forum, after posting about my gearbox problems (enough to ask forum moderators to delete my own multipage thread). The opinion that BMW was becoming a Sunday afternoon bike, meant for low-mileage, high margins, garage queen / trophy status, more than a daily / real life vehicle was the one that proved the most troublesome, for most forum members, here.

Well, reality is once again beyond internet wisdom. Today my BMW fanboy days are officially over. I've stood behind the brand and the bikes for so long, but the BMW transition from a "true, long distance bike" to a marketing hyped pile of fluff is now complete. Marketing has killed the product and the brand. A stranded BMW biker is no longer a rare occurence and it doesn't get a network of corporate pressured dealers to lose any sleep on how to get the rider back on the road asap. I've seen this both in the UK and Romania, across multiple dealers. Corporate HQ is non-existent in the relationship with customers, and they are incredibly disconnected from any form of deep / real responsibility for their product and service.

German top engineering and reliability is, as things currently stand, sorry ... a joke. And with BMW customers obsessing only over which display is better on their 2-3 years, 15-20k miles scheduled upgrade, there is no real pressure to change anything fundamental from the way BMW is doing business. They keep churning out unending iterations of gadget filled machines that are nothing more than disposable, expensive, toys.

Well, sorry, I don't want to play this game anymore. Too rich for my blood, too much mindless consumerism fuelling corporate irresponsibility. My time and money are no longer going to fuel this mess. Feel free to make your own choices - but for me it ends, today.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
15 years spread over 5 BMW bikes. R1200 C Montauk, R1200RT, 2x 1200 GSAs, and the current 17+ K1600 GT.

No more.

In 26000 kms (current mileage on my bike) I've experienced 3 satnav replacements, 1 gearbox replacement, and currently a hard to diagnose / fix gearshift pro failure.

Every few months, my bike spends time in the shop. This morning I went in with my bike in, the dealer thought replacing the sensor will fix the gearshift pro - it didn't, now they have to tear it down and fix it and they have no idea when I will have my bike back. Again. Less than a few months after being left without a bike due to the ridiculous gearbox recall which turned into a full gearbox replacement, that left me stranded for months.

I received a high amount of bashing on this forum, after posting about my gearbox problems (enough to ask forum moderators to delete my own multipage thread). The opinion that BMW was becoming a Sunday afternoon bike, meant for low-mileage, high margins, garage queen / trophy status, more than a daily / real life vehicle was the one that proved the most troublesome, for most forum members, here.

Well, reality is once again beyond internet wisdom. Today my BMW fanboy days are officially over. I've stood behind the brand and the bikes for so long, but the BMW transition from a "true, long distance bike" to a marketing hyped pile of fluff is now complete. Marketing has killed the product and the brand. A stranded BMW biker is no longer a rare occurence and it doesn't get a network of corporate pressured dealers to lose any sleep on how to get the rider back on the road asap. I've seen this both in the UK and Romania, across multiple dealers. Corporate HQ is non-existent in the relationship with customers, and they are incredibly disconnected from any form of deep / real responsibility for their product and service.

German top engineering and reliability is, as things currently stand, sorry ... a joke. And with BMW customers obsessing only over which display is better on their 2-3 years, 15-20k miles scheduled upgrade, there is no real pressure to change anything fundamental from the way BMW is doing business. They keep churning out unending iterations of gadget filled machines that are nothing more than disposable, expensive, toys.

Well, sorry, I don't want to play this game anymore. Too rich for my blood, too much mindless consumerism fuelling corporate irresponsibility. My time and money are no longer going to fuel this mess. Feel free to make your own choices - but for me it ends, today.
Sorry to hear that news. I've been dealing with and have owned BMWs since 1984, 36 years.
1. I bought a demo R100GS from BMW (NZ HQ) in 1989. Well out of warranty, the rear shock totally failed. Replaced at no cost, no discussion at all about money. Just replaced, have a nice day.
2. Europe 1991. BMW AG lent me a K100LT for three weeks, gratis, no conditions, no obligations.
3. USA 1991. BMW New Jersey (US HQ) lent me a K100 for two weeks, gratis, no conditions, no obligations.
4. New Zealand several occasions. Loaned me several bikes, gratis, no conditions, no obligations, no discussion.
5. 2020. While the recent transmission recall was being done on my K1600GT, BMW dealer NSW loaned me a 1200GS for a week.
I live 380 kms from dealer. Gratis, no conditions, no obligations.
Why?
I have written some stories of my international travels in motorcycle press, and have an interest in a tour company that owns many BMWs. But no formal credentials, ie. I am not a journalist.
On the road over severall hundred thousand miles, I cannot recall a serious issue, other than flat tyres.
My 1996 1100GS, did over 115000kms, (including around Australia) and was like new in every respect.
My current BMW 1200GS, stationed in the US, has 68000 miles up, including two Alaska Highway trips, and all States of the US except one, like new, no issues at all.
My new (Australian) K1600GT is running fine, but only has 18000Kms up. We'll see how that goes.

There is nothing like a rental fleet to find weak spots. My friend who owns the tour company, and many bikes, (100 +) reports few issues with the latest GSs. Some of the earlier bikes had ABS issues, and rear axles seal issues, but the new bikes are proving very reliable.

I am sorry to hear of your experiences, because as you can see, mine and that of the rental fleet, could not be more different.
Cheers, and happy riding....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22 Posts
My 2018 GTL had the motor replaced at 8000 miles due to excessive oil burn. The gear box recall this year, and now reverse stopped working.

Still enjoy the bike, but I can no longer tease the HD guys about their bikes. Now they tease me. Mine may be faster, but I just make it to the repair shop sooner.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,023 Posts
It is also unfortunate you can't get good feedback from other owners. Sadly, there are too many cool-aide drinkers who lack objectivity (this is seen with others manufacturers HD as well)..
Screw that sentiment. He’s received plenty of empathy and good honest sincere owner feedback. It’s a forum of mostly satisfied happy enthusiastic owners. We share our experience across the spectrum. Nothing’s perfect. Best to you.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
197 Posts
Man... that's too bad about the troubles with all of your BMW bikes. As they have become more of a marketing company instead of a motorcycle company, maybe you should try a different brand. I know in the US Harley Davidson is purely focused on refining a 90 year old design instead of marketing.
 

·
Q
Joined
·
5,302 Posts
You wanna know what I think? Probably not but your going to hear it anyways.😜

We all put that benchmark badge on too high of a pedestal. These bikes we ride are no more expensive than the equivalent touring bikes from Honda or Harley but for some reason we as buyers think that these BMW bikes we buy should be without trouble based purely on the fact they are a BMW and they cost so much money. I got a news flash for you.. Honda and Harley owners think the exact same way and theres just as many brand hater threads on those forums as there is here. Actually.. Harley forums are the worst by far. Those guys bitch and moan about how the MoCo is just in it for the money and they will never buy another one.. 3 months later the same asshat is posting pictures of his brand new motorcycle he got suckered into trading for when he was down at the dealership looking at t-shirts and chrome accessories for his old one. Coincidently enough.. the same old bike he proudly announced to everyone on the forum that he just paid off 6 months prior.

Back on topic.
Should they be without fault.. sure but its beyond me to believe they can make xxxxx bikes a year and have them all perform perfectly. Honda's new Wingdinger isnt without faults nor are the new Harleys, they all have quirks. Looking back can you name any BMW motorcycle built in the last 20 years that was absolutely flawless? That ran without breakdowns, no final drive issues, no rear ESA shock issues, no fuel strip issues, no fork seal issues, no loose rusty spokes.. They built many great motorcycles but very fecking few of them without some sort of issues. While these issues might be less with other brands, those bring their own challenges to the table as well.

That said, todays buyers read online forums like this to get a feel for the bike they would like to own. They read very little good, all the bad and with eyes wide shut... go buy one anyways. Or. Like the op here who has had several BMW's and had issues with all of them.. well why did he buy the last one then? I dont blame anyone for switching brands, I did it my self 6 years ago and have been perfectly happy ever since. Thankfully theres more here that are happy than disappointed, and that holds true across every brand. If your not happy then go buy something that blows your skirt up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
121 Posts
Well said, Darbinco. You all should have bought the 2013 Montego Blue model like I have or the 2012 one like Duane has got, there would be a ton less moaning. (says me, tongue- in- cheek, waiting for the gearbox oil to start leaking or reverse to pack up or the water pump leaks after the recall on my 2018!!!) Certainly, reading the horror stories, some guys have had real bad luck with their bikes, and I must say, that out of all of the Jap bikes that I had, many Yamahas, 2 ZX 1400's and an ST 1300 Honda, I did not have one problem, other than normal maintenance. It does make one concerned, so much so that I have just got a quote on an extended warranty aftermarket insurance. Would never have worried about it on my Jap bikes, but the K is far more technologically advanced, therefore more problems. Oh, well, I will enjoy it while it does not bleed water, oil or pistons. Still by far the smoothest bike I have ridden or owned. Enjoy the weekend wherever you all are.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
68 Posts
Naz,

I am sorry to hear that you're having issues. I have only been riding BMW for 8 or 9 months now. I have a 2015 GTL I bought used. I tried the Honda Goldwing and was not impressed but it's a nice bike. I get freaked out on all these threads I see about issues. I also just bought a 2016 R1200 R. Granted the bikes are used but I think that might be the better way to go. I couldn't swallow buying new. I have test ridden many bikes and to be honest BMW has what I love but like you say, time will tell whether I have a love/hate relationship with BMW. I hope it will be the former. There is a bike for everyone. Again this sucks you are having to deal with these issues.
Did you ever have any serious issues with your other BMW's aside from your GT? I did thorough research into the bikes I bought. The 2015 GTL seems to be solid with very little issues along with the 2016 R1200 R but we shall see. I have been riding almost every weekend when I can at long distances. Keep us posted on the progress of your bike. As for everyone else yes there are fanboys up in here. I have a friends that has the Yamaha logo tattooed on the back oh his thigh, SMH. I wonder if any BMW fanboys have the log tattoo? LOL.
 

·
Mr.Fix It
Joined
·
7,074 Posts
I've had my (un)fair share of problems over the past 8 years; e.g. motor replaced at 50K miles, water pump, handlebar switches, ball joints, etc. All of the major repairs were covered under either the BMW factory or Zurich extended warranties. Many tout the reliability of other brands of motorcycles. But, I wonder if those brands would fair so well if driven as hard as my '12 GT. I'm close to 90,000 miles and routinely ride the pi$$ out of this bike; e.g. sustained 90+ mph runs, into or very close to rev limiter on curvy roads, engine and trail braking, towing a trailer, 2-up riding, 1000 mile days, etc. Yes, I drive the bike pretty dang hard. And I'm not alone. Just jump on the back wheel of @6xGrins , @FloRider , and @MountainGT, just to name a few, and you'll see what I mean. I think it's unrealistic to expect any machine that is routinely ridden at it's limits to be "trouble-free". I call it the price of admission.

I'm not excusing bikes that have had 4 water pump replacements, numerous switches, clutch problems, oil leaks, left pull, oil usage, etc. Fortunately those bikes are the exception on the road and here on the forum, not the rule.

Duane
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
37 Posts
Man... that's too bad about the troubles with all of your BMW bikes. As they have become more of a marketing company instead of a motorcycle company, maybe you should try a different brand. I know in the US Harley Davidson is purely focused on refining a 90 year old design instead of marketing.
Now thats funny!!!!!.......I HOPE???.
 
61 - 80 of 110 Posts
Top