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Discussion Starter #1
I broke my CalSci medium extra wide windshield that I was very happy with. :cautious: At 5'7" I always kept it the down position, which was perfect for me to see over on the highway. But on gravel or mud, I couldn't see directly in front of the bike looking over the top of it. Based on that I'm thinking of going to the calsci shorty to give me more adjustment on the low end.

It is only 2" shorter so I am confident of no problem with airflow over my head. But it is 7" less wide than my extra wide, and 3" less wide than the standard CalSci.

So, in short (pun intended), anyone short folks go from a larger non-stock windshield to the CalSci shorty and how did it compare?

Anyone have the shorty, and happy with it on a 40 degree day?

As my woman has her own bike, I am not worried about the passenger.
 

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Get what you like. When I encounter serious gravel, I stand up on the pegs. Don't know if it helps, I just feel better doing it.
 

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I'm 5'9" or used to be.I purchased a Cal-Sci large and ended up cutting it down to a medium.I have also thought about cutting it shorter.
After a long day in the saddle the shield gets taller.:unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
After a long day in the saddle the shield gets taller.:unsure:
Strange how that happens.

I never really considered cutting down, though I know the instructions are on the CalSci site, and it is not hard. I just can't see me cutting a straight curved line.

I am thinking that is probably the best answer for me instead of getting the shorty. I do like all that air blocked.

Maybe Mark from CalSci will do it for me.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
How does the Wunderlich compare to the cal sci?
After re-reading the reviews here, I am sticking with the CalSci. CalSci and Aeroflow seem to be most recommended. Most reviews were from 2013 - 2016 and I assume Wunderlich was a k1600 late comer.

What is agreed on, more or less:

1. Like deciding which K16 to buy, it is a personal preference for which ones you like.
2. The stock shields suck - windy, noisy, have to look thru them, back pressure.
3. The CalSci, Aeroflow, and Wunderlich cut the noise, the wind, and allow the rider to look over it instead of thru it.
4. CalSci and Aeroflow are made from a DOT approved acrylic. 10-20x more impact resistant than glass, and unlike glass, breaks into blunt pieces. If scratched, scratches may be able to be repaired.
5. Wunderlich is made from a polycarbonate, 30x more impact resistant than Acrylic. It ain't gonna break. But scratches cannot be repaired, and poly-carbonates tends to become cloudy or yellow over time.
7. Lowest list price is the CalSci, but Aeroflow offers sales and blemished shields.
8. Aeroflow and Wunderlich may have back pressure if you or your passenger are too tall or you pick the wrong windshield size.

Never read any issues with back pressure and the CalSci. Maybe I missed them or the CalSci cut-out really does work.

What seems to be a consistent view:

CalSci if you want one that blocks the most air, thus warmer and quieter and one made of a DOT approved Impact modified acrylic (not sure what type).
Aeroflow if you want a little more air to keep you cool in the summer and one made of Implex Plus, an acrylic modified to be to 8x stronger than regular acrylic.
Wunderlich if you want a little more air and one made of Lexan, a brand name of poly-carbonate that in short, won't break, but scratches cannot be repaired.

Some have more than one shield, switching them out depending on season and if a passenger is along.

Since I am cheap, and the CalSci shorty is only about $130, I am hoping to get input on how the 5" less width will affect me.
 

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Strange how that happens.

I never really considered cutting down, though I know the instructions are on the CalSci site, and it is not hard. I just can't see me cutting a straight curved line.
It's not hard to do.I taped mine up with some painters tape and pressed cardboard.Take a combination square or anything else with your measurement and draw a line.you can use anything round laying around for the corners.Sabre saw or band saw it.Belt sander or hand sand the saw mark out.Finish sand smooth by hand and then us a propane or map torch to glaze it (just keep kiss the end with the torch until it comes up shiny.
 

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I found a saber saw blade made just for cutting plexiglass which worked well for this. It cuts in both directions so there is less pulling and chance of cracking the plastic. Gives a nice edge also. I finished mine of with some 800g wet sandpaper.

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