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2022 K1600B Grand America Option 719 Meteoric Dust
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There are many options for protection, but let's say engine Guards, pannier guards, bumpers to put over the engine guards, disc brake caliper guards, and Front Axle slider. Have I left anything out? If all bought new, parts cost are at closing on $1K? This is my quandary.
First, like my iPhone my GT is beautiful. I hate the idea of covering it up with an exoskeleton. While I want to protect it (her?), I have a $250 insurance deductible.

I must get some Whisky and contemplate what to do.
Agree with the sentiment -- and the whiskey!! -- but also weighed whether I'd really want to ever put an insurance claim in on a $1,500 repair and have insurance costs go up. I figure put bars on and hope they were a waste of money because the bike never gets dropped. Better than insurance, just a one-time cost.
Decisions, decisions.
 

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I don't have the rear crash bars, but the front ones are a no brainer. I'm not sure if you're talking about front or back, but front is a no brainer just to give you a bit more protection if the worst ever happens otherwise your feet will be the first thing to take the punishment.
 

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The rear bars will prevent scratches to the side cases. Maybe more robust bars on the front would also keep her from flopping all the way over.
 

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As others have posted, tip-over bars, engine guards, & bag guards are a better description. Going down at any speed (other than very, very slow), those bars are going or bend or break. You鈥檒l never see an manufacturer advertising any bars as 鈥渃rash bars.鈥 All they鈥檙e designed (and expected) to do is protect the bike if tipped over.
 

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2012 K1600 GT
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First: A bike has never been dropped until it is, then shoulda, woulda, coulda enters the picture. You never need protection until you do.
Second: Depending on the year and color, several parts and colors are no longer available from BMW. Try replacing one of the dark gray/silver speaker cover guards鈥/A.
Third: There are several brands of guards out there. If you are aggressive in the corners, be careful some don鈥檛 have the clearances and will scrape.
Fourth: If they work, most makers will show a bike layed over on the ground to prove they work.
Fifth: Some of the rear pannier guards are not comfortable for a passenger, if that鈥檚 important.

That鈥檚 a few thoughts. The forum can give you particular feedback on specific brands if you decide to go that route.

These are 800lb bikes and if they lean too far past a balance point, it鈥檚 going over. It鈥檚 happened to the the best of us.

Good luck.
 

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Would like to hear any reports or stories good or bad regarding crashbars you had on your bike and had a tip over, crash, wreck any type of incident where crash bars saved the bike from major damage or made the incident worse.

Ninja
I smashed two 1600GT's beyond repair and went down on the track once. The engine crash bars worked and protected the engine on all three crashes. The bikes were totaled in two of those.
 

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The "crash bars" are there to protect your legs more than the bike. Granted, they do sometimes protect the plastic, but isn't the real intent to allow you to escape the bike when pinned? I feel the real money is not in the bike; it is in your legs.
There's a retired motor cop on youtube that said in one of his numerous videos to keep your feet on the floorboards if you tip over. He rides Electra Glides with engine/crash/tip-over bars. He did not explain his reasoning for keeping the feet on the pegs/boards. It made no sense to me back then. However, now that you mention it, maybe you are right. I've always thought the bars were to protect the bike as much as possible depending on the situation. Coincidently, I was recently sideswiped at approximately 25 mph by a fellow rider, I then off-roaded about 50 ft. before crashing on grass covered dirt. Just before loosing control completely and slamming down on the bike's left side I put my left leg down to the ground which resulted in a snapped fibula near the ankle. My left leg then folded up like a rag doll and ended up against the bike's left side with me still in the normal rider's position on the seat. Without my bars holding the bike up I would have had a heck of a time getting away from the 850 lb. bike. Not a scratch on my Triumph Rocket III, the bars worked wonders. Me not so lucky. Titanium plates and screws held my fibula together until it welded itself back together.
 

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K1600GA
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Your experience is precisely why I was taught to teach it that way: legs in and knees braced. Never kick the bike away, and never, ever dump it...ever.
 
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There are crash bars, and there are crash bars. My brother laid his old Gold Wing down at about 65mph (ice under a bridge) and it slid to a stop. The crash bar saved his leg, but the bar completely wore down and took part of the engine case, too.

I am not confident the bars (engine and bags) on my 1600 would be as durable, but I know for a fact that they saved my bags and engine on a tipover, twice!

Well placed sliders might do the trick, but I'm not sure they are available for the GTL's
 

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I sure miss my LT's rubber protection for the bodywork. At zero speed the only thing that got marked up was the rubber!
 
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