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Got my first "21FE12 : Ignition coil 1 in firing order, output open circuit" error last week via my GS911. I guess there is no consistent time before it will fail for good, so I ordered a new one. In my case cylinder #1 and firing order #1 are the same so I know which cylinder it is.

But I'm confused with dmftoy1's error "21FE42 : Ignition coil 6, 3rd in firing order, output open circuit". First of all, was it read with a GS911? Second, the wording is different than mine. Third it does not make sense to me. The material I have read lists the firing order as 1-5-3-6-2-4. Thus coil 6 is the 4th in firing order, not the 3rd. Can anyone help me make sense of this?
without worrying about when it fires, 6 is the one on the right when you are sat on the bike
 
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About a year ago, two of my 2013 GTL coils failed. Bike still functioned, but not well...it felt like it was just running rough, but it's speed was limited. I have the extended warranty. Paid 100% of the repairs at the dealer. Somewhere north of $750...which was mostly labor. So far, the policy, which still has two years on it, has more than paid for itself.
 

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I had a similar problem with mine last year. Lost 2 coils, both were replaced under extended warranty. From what the dealer told me they count 1 through 6 from left to right as you are sitting on the bike. I did not hear about a specific firing order.
 

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The reason I'm bring up firing order is two fold. First my GS911 lists coil errors, I quote "21FE12 : Ignition coil 1 in firing order, output open circuit". Thus you have to know the firing order in order to determine which coil is bad. In this case coil 1 and firing order 1 both refer to cylinder 1, so their is no ambiguity. But, if the message had been "Ignition coil 4 in firing order, output open circuit", I think that would have been cylinder 6. Note firing order 1-5-3-6-2-4.

Now, my second problem is because I see an ambiguity in dmftoy1's error "21FE42 : Ignition coil 6, 3rd in firing order, output open circuit". This error message has two parts, coil number and firing order. Well, coil 6 is the forth in firing order not the third. Also, the 3rd in firing order is coil 3 not coil 6. Thus the error message "21FE42 : Ignition coil 6, 3rd in firing order, output open circuit" is ambiguous.

Am i right, or am I confused. If i'm wrong, can someone explain it to me?
 

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Replaced coil #6 twice, both done by dealer with no charge even though the bike was out of warranty. Haven't had any coil problems since. Did have the cam chain jump in Zagreb, Croatia requiring the top end to be rebuilt, that was repaired on my dime.
 

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Was the cylinder location ever answered?

According to the valve check sheet, cylinder #1 through #6 is left to right while sitting on bike. Or right to left as you face the cylinder head.

The manual would have you check the valves in this order 1-5-3-6-2-4.
 
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My bike is a 2016, with about 21,000 miles. Started getting an occasional yellow check engine light, usually after the engine was warm while idling at a stop light. The light would go off upon restart. The dealer read the fault code it showed it was a coil issue. He used a spray bottle of water and sprayed the headers while the engine was running to determine it was coil #3 not firing.

I didn’t notice any performance issues, no MPG change. In hindsight I remember thinking the engine was as smooth as it was and felt it might have been a bad tank of gas.

They don’t have the part in stock and may take a couple of weeks. Still under manufacturer warranty and I did buy an extended warranty.

I ride year-round rain or shine. Mechanic said it was a rare problem and he thought it might be connected to a moisture problem.

I will see what happens.
 

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The dealer read the fault code it showed it was a coil issue. He used a spray bottle of water and sprayed the headers while the engine was running to determine it was coil #3 not firing.

Mechanic said it was a rare problem and he thought it might be connected to a moisture problem.
The dealer is an idiot. The code reader tells him what coil has the fault. Spraying water to determine which coil? Loonie.

The mechanic is a liar. Coil problems are common. There is no evidence to indicate it is caused by a water problem. For bloody sake these bikes get wet when it rains.
 

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I have speculated with some significant evidence and many anecdotal reports that coil failure is more prevalent on K1600s that tend to get overheated. Water has nothing to do with it. This is not to say that coil failure will occur when or near when the temp gauge goes red. Just that bikes that have gone red have coil failure rates higher than bikes that have not seen the flashing red triangle of death. I also note that there is no one coil that tends to go more often than others. From this thread, one might come to the conclusion that number 6 coil fails more frequently than others. Not so. Some folks have suggested changing out all of their coils when one fails or preventativly even when none has failed. Either would be a waste of money and effort as there is no telling when or if any coil will fail. A new coil has just as much chance of failure as a coil with 100,000 miles on it.
 

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I am not sure of the exact sequence of events but I was standing nearby when the mechanic hooked up the diagnostic reader to a laptop computer and my motorcycle. He powered the bike and saw the error code and said it was an ignition coil. Then he started the bike and the code disappeared. I am not sure if he inadvertently cleared it. While the engine was running he said he wanted to use the water to confirm it was the coil.

Doesn’t make sense to me that if a cylinder isn’t firing why the warning light would be on and stay on. I received the warning light several times before I could get to the dealer. Every time the light would go off upon restart. I am not sure if the reader should have recorded each instance or not.

When the mechanic said the problem might be related to moisture, I understood him to be speculating.

My bike has never overheated.
 

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@Ace , your mechanic is wrong. Coil failures are normally intermittent, e.g. clear the code, light goes out until the coil fails again. Protocol is when his computer shows #3 coil bad code, change #3 coil.

Duane
 

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Ace, the coil's go flakey meaning they work fine but then they intermittently don't work and very slowly do this with increasing frequency until it completely fails. Each time the coil fails it will light the engine warning and when it clears itself the warning light goes out. When the coil starts going flakey it is almost not noticeable. At the end it is extremely annoying.

When the coil failed on my 2011 I put on another 15,000 km's before it got so bad I changed it. Until then it was simply an minor annoyance.

The ECU logs each error that is noted including which coil provided the error.

Because the ECU logs which coil it is that errored it can report it. When the mechanic used his diagnostic reader it would have told him which coil failed. There is simply no reason to do anything more. If the warning light was not on the coil was NOT failing and therefore the water trick would not work. If the coil was failing so badly to be continuously erroring out you would absolutely know it.

I hope this makes sense.
 

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Got it. The bike should be ready Thursday or Friday. I will ask some questions based on the info above.
 

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FWIW, based on my experiences with 4 bad coils, each one exhibited a little different behavior. As another mentioned, my first coil was so intermittent, I could hardly tell something was wrong except for the warning light. In contrast, the last coil rendered the bike almost unrideable...the bike barely idled at stoplights, and I was worried she wouldn’t make it to the dealer.

I had coils 4,5,6,5 replaced.

:)
 

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In 40,000 miles on my 2015 GTL I have had 5 coils go out (all but #2) and all under warranty 1 under extended warranty, plus 2 water pumps, and 1 tpm sensor and quite a few expensive tires. Still love the bike though. No Better out there in My opinion.
 
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My coil 2 is flakey, and starts to throw errors when the fan kicks in. I'm convinced it is related to a connection in the wiring where a power or earth is shared. I changed the fan, checked injectors and all sorts. The PIA for me is the amount to strip down to get at plugs. I've even brought a loom to do some back tracing, though the amount of wire makes it an awkward task
 
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I had no choice but to log another 5k miles with one bad coil, no money or tools for the fix at the time it popped up. I am pleased to say after a month of sweating, nightmares and learning experiences I DiY'd it back into one piece with the original problems mostly gone.

I still have two problems not dealt with yet, but both have easy to guess solutions. The single biggest remaining mechanical concern is engine related, the starter hesitates briefly (which is not normal but was there when the coil issue came up) during operation when everything is cold. I haven't replaced the OE battery yet and that is always my first move for removing one potential problem from the equation, I haven't had the money to make that part happen yet. Expenses keep creeping up that needed my attention, **** adulting is expensive.

The electrical subsystem is still on the unfinished portion of the upgrades list (neutrino, CWL, and some other stuff).

The last time I had a starter hesitate, it was on my 20-year-old car. I swapped the battery on it, still there, swapped the starter motor and it went away. So I'm waiting on the battery money to appear, OE batter is well past pull date and definitely is not holding a charge well at all. This issue throws no codes.
 

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I am not sure of the exact sequence of events but I was standing nearby when the mechanic hooked up the diagnostic reader to a laptop computer and my motorcycle. He powered the bike and saw the error code and said it was an ignition coil. Then he started the bike and the code disappeared. I am not sure if he inadvertently cleared it. While the engine was running he said he wanted to use the water to confirm it was the coil.

Doesn’t make sense to me that if a cylinder isn’t firing why the warning light would be on and stay on. I received the warning light several times before I could get to the dealer. Every time the light would go off upon restart. I am not sure if the reader should have recorded each instance or not.

When the mechanic said the problem might be related to moisture, I understood him to be speculating.

My bike has never overheated.
If it's throwing a coil error, the coil error typically clears when you shut it off, because the system is attempting to self heal the issue. There's a ton of embedded computing hardware in this bike, the computer is trying to keep everything running so you can ride it long enough to get it repaired. It's a fault tolerance feature pioneered by computing tech from the 60's.
When you shut off the bike, turning it back on (triggering a reboot, the starter motor cycles) and the old engine error is cleared from the registers until a new one comes up.
The error tracking log has a limited number of events before each subsystem clears its internal buffer.
 

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I have speculated with some significant evidence and many anecdotal reports that coil failure is more prevalent on K1600s that tend to get overheated. Water has nothing to do with it. This is not to say that coil failure will occur when or near when the temp gauge goes red. Just that bikes that have gone red have coil failures rates higher than bikes that have not seen the flashing red triangle of death. I also note that there is no one coil that tends to go more often than others. From this thread, one might come to the conclusion that the number 6 coil fails more frequently than others. Not so. Some folks have suggested changing out all of their coils when one fails or preventatively even when none has failed. Either would be a waste of money and effort as there is no telling when or if anyone coil will fail. A new coil has just as much chance of failure as a coil with 100,000 miles on it.
I am definitely on the same page as you regarding heat, I think that is likely the #1 source of failure aside from age or electrical related stuff.
The coil itself seems to have some solid state gadgetry inside it.
The K16 engine runs very hot by default, if for any reason the cooling system underperforms, the temp will spike to what I think is an unhealthy operating temperature (the upper limits of what the HUD indicator shows).
I'm floating a few ideas on improving its performance but I'll hold off on those for a while until I address other more pressing issues.
 
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