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Got a flat tire once in 2011 while doing interstate speed. Funny thing I should have suspected it when I left Walmart and jumped on my bike I wasn't as tipied toe lol. It didn't click until miles later at speeds when handling felt a little weird. I pulled over and rear tire was getting lower and lower. This was on an FZ1, so no equipment.
Called the wife and she brought the trailer for me to load her up. Only took an hour lol
 

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790 Posts
1. Have you ever had a flat front tire during your years of travel? Yes, but not as any many as rear.
2. Have you ever had a flat rear tire during your years of travel? Lots, and the bike does quite well with 14 psi. Not so good, but not that bad, with my one blow out.
3. How many miles have you travelled over the years? (i.e. you get one flat about every X thousand miles)
  • Miles - Hmmm - At least 500k miles
  • Never had a mc flat until the last 10 years/150k miles - all in Atlanta and all on k1600s.
4. Do you carry equipment to repair the flat? Yes. And I agree with Ryan (see above video), but!
  • Just used the Pitstop and the mushroom plugs yesterday, instead of my go to DynaPlug. Though I liked the size of the DynaPlug, and used it many times, but the last time the force it in hurt my hand pushing and I felt I was pushing the bike over. And I just repaired my last DynaPlug repair with a mushroom plug. Like Ryan said, a lot of air comes out.
5. If carry equipment, besides a kit to plug the hole, do you refill the tire with an air pump or CO2 cartridges? Air pump when available.
6. If you don't carry equipment to repair the flat, how does the flat get fixed?
  1. Post for help on this forum, hoping I happen to be near Gunnert's house
  2. Get a tow to place to sleep bc you're inevitably away from home,
  3. buy the tools to take the wheel off (bc you're inevitably away from home),
  4. Take the wheel off,
  5. Wait until Tuesday (because the flat will inevitably be a Sunday or Monday) to have Cycle Gear (if lucky) or shop for replacement.
  6. Wish the forum who had the tools and extra tire offered help on Wed had logged in Sun
 

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I’ve had one flat in about 100,000 miles of riding. It was in the rear tire. I was in Nevada on I80 heading west.. between Lovelock and Fernley.. closer to Lovelock.

I had a patch kit and compressor with me. I could not find the hole for the life of me. It was 105 degrees that day mind you and I’d drank all my water at my last stop (in Lovelock) thinking I’m almost to Reno and the Hotel for the day.

Anyway, being hot and stressed were working against me and I would put air in the tire but could not find the leak. I could hear it. Couldn’t find it.

So I called a tow truck.. which took 2.5 hours to get to me.. towed me to Reno. Cost me $690.

The shop was closing by the time I got there so I Uber to the hotel. Next morning the tire guy shows me the hole where a screw got me. It was there plain as day but for the life of I couldn’t find it on the side of the road.

The tire guy recommended I carry “green slime”. He said it would have saved me $690 in tow fees. I keep a bottle in the bike now just in case.

And I never finish my water without buying more. That was crazy how thirsty I got.
 

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795 Posts
I’ve had one flat across 10 bikes in 22 years of riding. The flat was a rear tire back in 2006 on a Honda VFR 800. Local day ride. Plugged it with a string plug, pumped it up with a Slime portable compressor and was back on the road in 30 minutes.

I had a front tire valve core failure on my HD back in 2017 in Washington state during a five week solo trip out west. Discovered it in the hotel parking lot one morning thinking I had a puncture, but could find no evidence except air escaping from the valve core. Fortunately I kept a valve core extractor and spare valve core in my tire repair kit. Valve core failures/leaks are probably rare, but I’d recommend keeping an extractor and spare in your kit. Cheap insurance from your local auto parts store.
 

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2022 K1600GTL Gravity Blue
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5 Posts
2022 MI/KM:
4
1 - Yes, valve stem failure (blew out at 70 mph) and a nail (slow leak)
2 - Yes, nail (slow leak) x2
3 - Hard to say, 3 occurred over 100k miles
4 - Yes, used to have a Tire Plugger but have found the cord type are better for wider range of repairs.
5 - Both - carry spare CO2 if you're gonna depend solely upon those.
6 - AAA

I'm a big fan of the CNC valve stems instead of the standard rubber but the BMW rims use standard car size valve stems you can find at the Autoparts store.

Wheel Bicycle tire Tire Automotive tire Hood
 

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2018 K1600B
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374 Posts
2022 MI/KM:
1642
I’ve had nails in rear tires on both bikes, one each, in approximately 30K miles total. Neither was really a flat, just a slow leak detected and repaired at home in garage.
I bought the StopNGo kit with the four CO2 cylinders. The mushroom plugs work well on both MC tires; only had a continued slow leak on a car tire puncture and repair.
I haven’t yet needed the CO2 to inflate, but the consensus hear is a compressor, which I agree with. I think the four cartridges may only be sufficient for the smaller front tire…and only barely. So I’ll look into the compressor (whatever @Gunnert uses because he’s my hero). However, should the need arise, I’ll start with those four CO2s and let y’all know how much PSI they put in the rear tire.
Also have VISA and AAA.
 

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865 Posts
I bought the StopNGo kit with the four CO2 cylinders. The mushroom plugs work well on both MC tires; only had a continued slow leak on a car tire puncture and repair.
Although the StopNGo shroom plugs already fared worst in the Youtube test they failed to mention the most serious shortcoming. No matter how much you ream the puncture, if used on steel belted tires, the shredded steel WILL eventually cut off the head of the mushroom and the remaining plug will spit out.

Tom
 

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2012 K1600GTL Premium
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317 Posts
Thanks for posting this thread and causing me to get my first ever flat. :mad: Air compressor saved the day so I could limp 30 miles home. New tire on order and hopefully will be here before our 2K+ mile trip east next week. 🤞 It should.

Tire Wheel Automotive tire Synthetic rubber Tread
 

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'13 K1600GT, '17 Bonneville T120
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180 Posts
1. Have you ever had a flat front tire during your years of travel?
2. Have you ever had a flat rear tire during your years of travel?
3. How many miles have you travelled over the years? (i.e. you get one flat about every X thousand miles)
4. Do you carry equipment to repair the flat?
5. If carry equipment, besides a kit to plug the hole, do you refill the tire with an air pump or CO2 cartridges?
6. If you don't carry equipment to repair the flat, how does the flat get fixed?
Been riding for 55 years.
1. Never had a front flat, ever.
2. Have had many rear flats.
3. Don't know how many total miles travelled but had six rear flats on my '17 Triumph T120 Bonneville in the last 20,000 miles. Zero flats on the '13 K1600GT.
4. Yes, I carry a plug kit on the K1600GT. I carry no tire repair stuff on the Triumph, it has spoked wheels with inner tubes.
5. Along with the plug kit I carry a 12V portable inflator/compressor on the K1600GT.
6. For a flat on the Triumph I call my wife to load my ramps into and bring my pickup truck, ride the Triumph up into the truck bed and drive it home for repair.
 

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2016 K1600 GTL, 2005 Bushtec Trailer and a 2020 R1250 GS
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754 Posts
Interesting it "seems" to be more common on the rear. For me it has been and others I've been around when it happened. Any rationale behind that. Hmmm.... :unsure:
Here's a possible answer to your question as to why it seems that rear tires suffer more punctures than front tires. Here we go: Many years ago there was a major trucking company by the name of Johnson Motor Lines, Inc. headquartered in Charlotte, NC. Their maintenance department was pretty sophisticated for the times. After performing numerous 'studies' they concluded that the primary cause of flat rear drive tires was the front "steering axle" tire would run over a sharp object and "throw it" into the path of one of the following drive tires. As a result of their findings the Charlottle maintenance shop started installing small mudflaps to the rear of the steer tires as well as small mudflaps positioned between the two drive axles. On road flat tire failures were substantially reduced. Perhaps our front tires are doing the same thing to our rear tires. Let the nashing of the teeth and the wailing of the lungs begin...
 

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4,380 Posts
Thanks for posting this thread and causing me to get my first ever flat. :mad: Air compressor saved the day so I could limp 30 miles home. New tire on order and hopefully will be here before our 2K+ mile trip east next week. 🤞 It should.

View attachment 170254
I would fix that and keep rideing.
 

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Premium Member
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442 Posts
2022 MI/KM:
2340
Here's a possible answer to your question as to why it seems that rear tires suffer more punctures than front tires. Here we go: Many years ago there was a major trucking company by the name of Johnson Motor Lines, Inc. headquartered in Charlotte, NC. Their maintenance department was pretty sophisticated for the times. After performing numerous 'studies' they concluded that the primary cause of flat rear drive tires was the front "steering axle" tire would run over a sharp object and "throw it" into the path of one of the following drive tires. As a result of their findings the Charlottle maintenance shop started installing small mudflaps to the rear of the steer tires as well as small mudflaps positioned between the two drive axles. On road flat tire failures were substantially reduced. Perhaps our front tires are doing the same thing to our rear tires. Let the nashing of the teeth and the wailing of the lungs begin...
Makes total sense. It's not like the nails and the sharp objects are just positioned straight up ready for puncture. If so, front tire casualty. Its more or less lying dormant on its side...get it dancing and the rear to hits it just right...object imbedded. I learned something new.
 

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1,693 Posts
2022 MI/KM:
38.9
I’ve had nails in rear tires on both bikes, one each, in approximately 30K miles total. Neither was really a flat, just a slow leak detected and repaired at home in garage.
I bought the StopNGo kit with the four CO2 cylinders. The mushroom plugs work well on both MC tires; only had a continued slow leak on a car tire puncture and repair.
I haven’t yet needed the CO2 to inflate, but the consensus hear is a compressor, which I agree with. I think the four cartridges may only be sufficient for the smaller front tire…and only barely. So I’ll look into the compressor (whatever @Gunnert uses because he’s my hero). However, should the need arise, I’ll start with those four CO2s and let y’all know how much PSI they put in the rear tire.
Also have VISA and AAA.
Those mushroom plugs are garbage. You need glue.
 

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2018 BMW K1600 GA, 2022 BMW K1600 GTL
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3 Posts
2022 MI/KM:
10k+
1. Have you ever had a flat front tire during your years of travel?
2. Have you ever had a flat rear tire during your years of travel?
3. How many miles have you travelled over the years? (i.e. you get one flat about every X thousand miles)
4. Do you carry equipment to repair the flat?
5. If carry equipment, besides a kit to plug the hole, do you refill the tire with an air pump or CO2 cartridges?
6. If you don't carry equipment to repair the flat, how does the flat get fixed?
 

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Registered
2018 BMW K1600 GA, 2022 BMW K1600 GTL
Joined
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3 Posts
2022 MI/KM:
10k+
1. Have you ever had a flat front tire during your years of travel?
2. Have you ever had a flat rear tire during your years of travel?
3. How many miles have you travelled over the years? (i.e. you get one flat about every X thousand miles)
4. Do you carry equipment to repair the flat?
5. If carry equipment, besides a kit to plug the hole, do you refill the tire with an air pump or CO2 cartridges?
6. If you don't carry equipment to repair the flat, how does the flat get fixed?
1. Yes. 1973 Kawasaki 350. Downed, but not major.
2. Yes. 1978 Honda Goldwing. Safely parked it beside the road, rode home with a buddy to watch an FSU football game. Returned the next day to plug it and fill it with a "tire repair in a can."
3. Crossed 460,000 in August after completing a 9,200 mile 4-corner of US and Canada.
4. Yes.
5. I carry both CO2 (with 2 cartridges) and a 12v pump. The CO2 is handy for quickly adjusting the air in my trailer, or small tire pressure adjustments.
6. AAA or BMW Roadside Assistance.
 

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Had a rear in middle of France this year.
Warning popped up on the screen ,loosing 1 bar in 30 minutes.
Hit the Mottorad button on the sat nav took me to the nearest dealer.
200 Euros later and 3 hours (stopped in lunchtime) back on the road.
Easy with sat nav to tell me where a dealer was.
 
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