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Discussion Starter #1
My 2012 came with two "remote control" fobs that, as far as I can recall, still have the original batteries in them and they both still work.

My 2018 came with, of course, only one "real" key as part of the "Keyless Ride" system. When I acquired the bike less than a year ago, it was a few weeks on that the "Low Fob Battery" warning light started annuciating upon startup. "No problem!", thought I. "I will just replace it..."

So last Octoberish I did.

Between winter, bike projects, and other obligations, I have hardly ridden at all since. Right around the Dec/Jan timeframe, I noticed the bike started giving me a "Low Fob Battery" warning whenever I fired up the bike for whatever reason.

Just went out to load the bike for a ride today and when I hit the ON button on the bars, all I got was the flashing red light on the instrument cluster that indicates the bike cannot see the key...

"Odd!", thinks I. "The key is right there where I always keep it, in the fairing pouch."

I moved the key to the "magic spot" in front of the fuel filler and the bike came on and gave me a "Missing Key" indication. Obviously the battery on the fob has once again died.

With the 2012 (and the K11LT, K75s, and two GL1000s before it), the ONLY time I ever removed the key from the ignition was when I was parking it over night somewhere it was not parked within easy .45 range. It has become such an ingrained part of our routine that when I got the 2018, I adapted the process to where I always keep the key in the fairing pouch.

It occurs to me that this might not be such a good plan. Could it be that the bike and the key are always communicating with each other as long as they are within range? I cannot believe that the battery would only last a couple months in an idle state. The wife's Ford fob for her "keyless" automobile is over a year old now and it still is going strong.

I really hate the thought of having to either replace the battery every couple months or try to develop a new routine where I store the key somewhere away from the bike, ensuring I never have it handy when I go out to the bike to do something that requires the key...

So.... Where do YOU keep your "keyless" fob when not out on a ride and how long does your battery last?
 

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about 2 years
 

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My fob battery has reliably died right around the 2 year mark too. I’ve updated my spring routine to replace. Much easier to do it at home than on the road.
 

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My fob use to die every couple months until I installed a Duracell battery. Now it's over a year old and still working.

I also store the fob in a drawer of my metal tool box that is about 6 feet away. When stored the bike doesn't see it.
 

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I am not sure, but I do believe you do want it far enough away so that it goes to "sleep". If it is close enough to start the bike or nearly close enough, it may be, as you said, trying to communicate the whole time.
 

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My fob use to die every couple months until I installed a Duracell battery. Now it's over a year old and still working.

I also store the fob in a drawer of my metal tool box that is about 6 feet away. When stored the bike doesn't see it.
Do you remember which Duracell battery was it......???
 

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In the U.K., if a key is left in or on a vehicle that is subsequently stolen then the theft cover of the insurance policy is voided so I never keep my key fob on the bike.

In addition, as general vehicle security has improved making them harder to steal by conventional means, the low-life’s preferred method to make off with keyless vehicles is a key relay attack. My K1600 fob therefore lives in a Faraday bag in the house when I’m not using it. Battery is now just over a year old and still working fine.

My guess is that @RefCat is correct when he suggests that there is a regular handshake process going on when the key and bike are within range of each other that drains the fob battery.
 

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My 2012 came with two "remote control" fobs that, as far as I can recall, still have the original batteries in them and they both still work.

My 2018 came with, of course, only one "real" key as part of the "Keyless Ride" system. When I acquired the bike less than a year ago, it was a few weeks on that the "Low Fob Battery" warning light started annuciating upon startup. "No problem!", thought I. "I will just replace it..."

So last Octoberish I did.

Between winter, bike projects, and other obligations, I have hardly ridden at all since. Right around the Dec/Jan timeframe, I noticed the bike started giving me a "Low Fob Battery" warning whenever I fired up the bike for whatever reason.

Just went out to load the bike for a ride today and when I hit the ON button on the bars, all I got was the flashing red light on the instrument cluster that indicates the bike cannot see the key...

"Odd!", thinks I. "The key is right there where I always keep it, in the fairing pouch."

I moved the key to the "magic spot" in front of the fuel filler and the bike came on and gave me a "Missing Key" indication. Obviously the battery on the fob has once again died.

With the 2012 (and the K11LT, K75s, and two GL1000s before it), the ONLY time I ever removed the key from the ignition was when I was parking it over night somewhere it was not parked within easy .45 range. It has become such an ingrained part of our routine that when I got the 2018, I adapted the process to where I always keep the key in the fairing pouch.

It occurs to me that this might not be such a good plan. Could it be that the bike and the key are always communicating with each other as long as they are within range? I cannot believe that the battery would only last a couple months in an idle state. The wife's Ford fob for her "keyless" automobile is over a year old now and it still is going strong.

I really hate the thought of having to either replace the battery every couple months or try to develop a new routine where I store the key somewhere away from the bike, ensuring I never have it handy when I go out to the bike to do something that requires the key...

So.... Where do YOU keep your "keyless" fob when not out on a ride and how long does your battery last?
My 2012 came with two "remote control" fobs that, as far as I can recall, still have the original batteries in them and they both still work.

My 2018 came with, of course, only one "real" key as part of the "Keyless Ride" system. When I acquired the bike less than a year ago, it was a few weeks on that the "Low Fob Battery" warning light started annuciating upon startup. "No problem!", thought I. "I will just replace it..."

So last Octoberish I did.

Between winter, bike projects, and other obligations, I have hardly ridden at all since. Right around the Dec/Jan timeframe, I noticed the bike started giving me a "Low Fob Battery" warning whenever I fired up the bike for whatever reason.

Just went out to load the bike for a ride today and when I hit the ON button on the bars, all I got was the flashing red light on the instrument cluster that indicates the bike cannot see the key...

"Odd!", thinks I. "The key is right there where I always keep it, in the fairing pouch."

I moved the key to the "magic spot" in front of the fuel filler and the bike came on and gave me a "Missing Key" indication. Obviously the battery on the fob has once again died.

With the 2012 (and the K11LT, K75s, and two GL1000s before it), the ONLY time I ever removed the key from the ignition was when I was parking it over night somewhere it was not parked within easy .45 range. It has become such an ingrained part of our routine that when I got the 2018, I adapted the process to where I always keep the key in the fairing pouch.

It occurs to me that this might not be such a good plan. Could it be that the bike and the key are always communicating with each other as long as they are within range? I cannot believe that the battery would only last a couple months in an idle state. The wife's Ford fob for her "keyless" automobile is over a year old now and it still is going strong.

I really hate the thought of having to either replace the battery every couple months or try to develop a new routine where I store the key somewhere away from the bike, ensuring I never have it handy when I go out to the bike to do something that requires the key...

So.... Where do YOU keep your "keyless" fob when not out on a ride and how long does your battery last?
 

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One FOB (black Case) in the left pocket of my riding jacket, the other (brown case) in a tool box drawer out of range of the bike but in the garage to save me a trip back in the house for a FOB if I want to work on the bike, then it usually goes in my wife's jacket pocket when we ride so she has access to the bags if she needs something or mine fails or goes missing :D
 

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Mine lasted 2 years and died quickly. I have a spare fob and it's battery was also weak.
Voltage check does not accurately show a LI battery life, the voltage may show good but have weak output.
I now keep spare battery in tank bag.
Try to buy a battery with the farthest out 'freshness' date.
 

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I now have three bikes with fobs. I keep the fobs stored out of communication range with the bikes. The first bike I had with a fob was the K1600. Early on, I noticed that the fob battery died quickly, when I left it stored close to the bike. The "handshaking" seemed to kill it. The battery in the fob now, is over 2 years old. I keep an extra battery in the side pocket. Honda has a good solution, you can hold the main fob button for three seconds and it turns the fob off or on.
 

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This may explain why my low battery light is always coming on. I hang the fob on the X grip phone mount when not riding the bike. May have to try moving it further away.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for all the replys. Looks like my suspicion of constant communication has been tentatively confirmed and I may need to change my "At Home" routine. I do have tool boxes nearby... 🤓
 

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Discussion Starter #20
2032
As mentioned above but worth restating. If your fob goes dead you can still start your bike by laying it on the tank just forward of the fill hole.

When I was plumbing the tank for aux fuel I noticed the ring was just forward and offset to the right of the centerline. Right about the 1 o'clock position.

If I had not seen it there I likely would have forgotten about it and this post would have been completely different... 🤣
 
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