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stay in rain mode , comfort, 2up setting for a nice smooth ride. HTH
On my 2019 GA, I use 2-up setting, Cruise suspension, and road mode. As a dirt bike rider, I am not comfortable with the bike manipulating my acceleration. I exercise strict clutch control, and rely on the on-demand torque when I might need it. My rear tire sipped out from under me once when I crossed the center divider, and had I not had control of the power band, I would have had a harder time keeping it upright, and riding through it.

If we are going through windy roads, I switch it to road mode suspension to get the firmer suspension for a better stick to the road.
 

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Creature comforts are also important for both. I have a small tank bag that is sort of insulated. I put a hiking water bladder in the bag and coil the hose on the top. On hot days I fill with water (half of it is ice). On really hot days I add gator aid and mostly ice. While riding i can easily unzip one side of the bag and pull the hose out. I take the first drink so that she gets a colder drink. I can easily hand her the hose over my shoulder.
 

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My wife gets on first, intially onto the driver's seat then pushes herself backup on to the passenger seat. I then lift my leg over and sit on and raise the side stand.

We have an exclusive with the standard seat and screen, I put the screen fully up and she is fine with that configuration. She has been known to fall asleep back there. She loves the armrests.

Paul
Paul, do you have the BMW arm rests or an after market brand!
 

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OK first I've been riding ~50 years, last 6 on a 2014 GTL/E, and you'd figure I'd have all the answers by now. But I'm not so proud to ask for advise when I'm out of my element.

This is the real embarrassing question, how do you get your passenger on the bike? Let her on first? While on the center stand or side stand or both stands up? I'm just trying to do it right from day one so as to not embarrass myself.

Also which windscreen (make and model please) provides the most barn door experience (no or little wind, and noise reduction) especially for my passenger? Looking through it is not a problem as long as it not distort my vision too badly, and I can always lower it when going through curves.
A. It is always better to let others gain the experience and embarrassment. Good on you for putting aside your ego and asking question
B. This is absolutely the most important advice I can give you. An old friend that rode about 40-60K a year gave it to me and it has served me well:
"If you want her to ride as your regular passenger, you make sure you have done everything possible to make her comfortable back there"
C: You've got a lot of choices now for deciding the best way for the two of you to get onboard. There is noting wrong with trying multiple ones before choosing what works for YOU best.
I'm kind of short. My feet barely reach ground. I find I'm much more comfortable having the side stand down when gets on after me. Over time, her knees don't bend like they used to. Remember that once you are on, she has to sort of step through the gap between you and your rear luggage. We changed our routine to she gets on first, and skootches back as far as she can. Then I step on the foot peg and can bring my right leg over fairly easy.

Another thing to be aware of. Agree to some ground rules before you ride away into the sunset. I always tell my passengers to please not squirm around when I'm rolling to a stop. For me, that's a critical time. I usually suggest "lean forward when we take off, lean back when we are braking.
 

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Discussion Starter #65
"If you want her to ride as your regular passenger, you make sure you have done everything possible to make her comfortable back there"
Hence the question! Mounting the GTL is the one and only component to our rides that could be less awkward. Wind and noise protection is to increase her comfort! Perfect!
 

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My wife can see just over my helmet with the standard height GTL saddle, which she prefers, so that is on the bike when she rides with me. The best screen for her has been the Wunderlich screen, which I do have to have high enough that I look through it, combined with the Areoflow wings. The Wunderlich blocks too much air for me in the summer, so it is switched out when I go for long rides by myself. If I'm too lazy to switch back screens, she notices as soon as we get over 60mph, which limits getting anywhere quickly.
 

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I ride to work without my wife and that's about it. We will be a little short of our 20,000 mile goal this year. Just traded in my 2015 for a 2020 GTL kept the RDL Seat. I'm 6'6" and my wife is 5'2". I tell her all the time that I'll do anything that I can to make the ride better for her. Without her don't think that I would ride near as much. She had wind buffing trouble and I could hear it through the comms. And she had trouble at 5'2" what if she was 5'7"? Bought the Puig Item: P836143 SKU: 1790896 from Revzilla last year. Riding around town I can keep it down, but on the road ride with it up 3/4 of the way. Yes, I have to look through the shield and don't like that the best. Also put on Ilium Floorboard risers. When seated she is great, now just getting on is cumbersome. Usually look for a curb for her to step on then the bike, that makes a world of difference. I'm always on the bike when she gets on, and when I can leave the kickstand down. Last year when she went to get on my foot was on some sand and I about dumped the bike. Kickstand saved the day. Found this picture with the 2015 and a wind blade on. It's shows how the air would flow over me and hit her. With our height difference she still sits taller than me. Lowering the RDL seat for the passenger, interesting? Warning not to low or all the pad will be missing and then you run into another problem. Know of a short k rider that has a RDL and the seat is as hard as a rock.
 

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I have a 2016 gtle. 90 per cent ride 2 up. Partner is about 5.5. No complaints from her or she would get left behind.
She gets on last..me holding bike vertical..no stands. She warns me she is about to mount so I can counteract the weight..she steps on lh pegs and lifts leg over.
I also have the small and big wings which I only use in winter.
Standard screen and seat but if I lived in the states I would look at something suited for an old arse..I'm 65
Have done over 46000km in 41/2 years. This bike loves 2 up.

Sent from my SM-G973F using Tapatalk
 

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Lots of good advice here! I hadn't considered leaving the bike on the side stand while the wife climbs aboard. On the Harley it barely moves, with the GTL and a bit higher seating position I do have to hold it steady.

The only thing I would add is I tell my passengers to never lean. I cannot tell what they are doing and if they lean one way or another it changes the CG and I have to counter. I don't ride hard enough with a passenger to need to lean anyway. But eliminating one dynamic lets me manage the CG.
 

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2019 GTL with option 719 seat, she's 4ft 11,I'm 6ft, and she weighs about 120-130.
She always gets on after me, I stand up holding bike vertical whilst she gets on, centre stand down for safety if gravel. She loves the armrests and I feel happier with them because she sometimes falls asleep on long rides.

She seems to be more in the weather, on a cold day, her hands get cold if she holds the side grips. She has a heated jacket and gloves and USB to keep her phone working.

The helmets are paired together and her helmet is also paired to her phone so she uses social media and listens to own music and takes photos. I think it's really important that she's comfortable. Ear plugs are a good idea

We've happily cruised at 100mph but she's not so happy if I lean the bike a lot I take the corners steady and constant speed. Remember that she cannot anticipate sudden acceleration and braking so smooth acceleration and braking will make things confortable.

She also manages any stuff like road tolls. I always tell her when a good stop is coming and ask if she wants to stop.

We have ridden thousands of happy miles and we go out all the time. Well worth changing a few habits for the benefits.
147198

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But remember, it can be complicated
147199
 

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OK here goes.
Make sure she has the latest in riding gear which includes cold weather, hot weather and wet weather. Jackets, pants, boots and gloves. A full face (preferably modular) helmet will help with the buffeting. Intercom system. If she likes different music than you make sure that can be accomplished. The Sena 50S should work well as you can talk and still listen to the music. Purchasing from a dealer that carries a full compliment of gear is a must. Cycle Gear has been a good outlet for us to let my wife try on everything before purchasing. Don't scrimp on cost, "Happy passenger, happy driver"
Also hearing protection.

Fortunately you already have arm rests on your Exclusive. Create a cup holder for her.

Start from home with a full tank of gas. My wife hates it if I have to stop before getting out of town to fill up.
When starting out from home allow LOTS of time for her to get ready. Be patient and don't be all geared up and ready to ride. Us long time riders can usually go out to the bike and be on the road in 5-10 minutes. Not so with my wife. The anxiety of the ride has her debating on which coat and gloves to wear, where to put her purse (have her get a small purse just for the motorcycle). She needs to get the music going, trips back in the house several times etc. etc. etc. Now this is a woman who has been riding with me for 51 years.

My wife is not very heavy and has a long inseam so it's pretty easy for her to climb on after I'm on and steading the bike. The reverse for getting off. I purchased floor boards for her immediately after purchasing my first K1600. She likes them a lot.

If you can take some day rides with other couples, especially seasoned ones, that will help a lot. The other ladies will take her under their wing and give her tips. They won't be the same tips you would give her so keep quiet and let her try theirs first. If you don't know this, women think differently then men.

No shenanigans while riding. Speed limits should be adhered to especially in the mountains on twisty roads. No dragging metal when leaning over on curves. Only pass cars when there is plenty of room. No sudden stops, anticipate stop lights early. Hopefully, after she gets used to riding a motorcycle, she will let you know what is fun for her and what is not. Engage in those conversations.

Don't do long days unless she says it's OK. Be aware she may say it's OK just to please you so cut it short anyway. On that note stay at the nicer motels and take her out to decent restaurants. These things will be part of her overall "motorcycle experience".

She needs to learn how to "lean". Have her just do what you do. I had a friend who's wife would lean the wrong way which actually caused them to run off the road once. Notice the word "once". She never road with him again.

The one thing my wife doesn't like is the fact that she is staring at the back of my helmet. Even though I tell her she can lean over and look ahead she says she doesn't want to adversely effect the handling of the bike and this is after 51 years of riding. If your girl likes to take pictures that is a nice way to give her something to do back there and to show at the end of the day. Start a photo album of each trip. Let her pick some destinations or stopping places.

I wasn't going to write this much but it kept pouring out as I went along. I hope some of these ideas are helpful.
Penned beautifully - I want to thank you for taking the time to put this together - doesn't matter where in the world we live in - women are all the same and I really appreciate your take on the female prospective - it is to be really appreciated and adored.
Cheers from OZ
Paul
 

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Engine running, bike in neutral. Ensure you're on flat, level, stable ground. Hand firmly on the front brake. Make sure you develop a hand signal for when it's time for her to mount up. Likewise, agree on a signal for when it's ok for her to dismount. E.g., I tap my wife's left knee.
 

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Have not driven the car much this year so my wife says she feels more stable on the K planted in the turns rather than getting tossed around in the car compliments to the bike and mabe me a little to ;)
 

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I can't stress enough how important it is for your passenger to be absolutely still and not shuffle around at slow speeds, especially when you are about to stop or take off from a stop. The bike get even more "top heavy" with a passenger, the point of no return comes quite fast!
Make sure you plan your stops and where you will plant your feet, do not risk a slippery surface or off-camber pavement.
And work out your core, legs, arms and your grip, you will need it...
I ride 2 up most of the time, wife is 5'6'', 130 lbs. 2013 GTL with RDL seat and large aeroflow screen and winglets, I have to raise it almost all the way up to push the air over her helmet, and still she gets a little buffeting on her shoulders. I got used to look through the screen but in rainy weather I need to lower it so the droplets run off of it. The wife gets a lot of rain on her head and shoulders then, while I remain mostly dry as long as I keep highway speeds.
 

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A lot of good advice here.....
I had a situation with my wife on one of our first road trips together. We were ascending/descending a nice curvy two-lane in the Sierra Mountain Range and when we stopped for a short break - SHE WAS NOT HAPPY!!
So in my quest to find out what she was doing as far as seating position/head movement etc. I came to realize she was so intent on looking sideways (looking out over the edge the road /down deep drop-offs from the road - she became very uneasy/scared.
So after a brief break I told her to simply look over my shoulder (in whatever) direction of the curve.
So at our next stop - she was at ease (and happier)!!!! Didn't have complaint for the rest of the trip.
(The ride was a lot smoother for me after she did the "over-the-shoulder" head positioning. As I looked back at our previous hours of riding that particular day - the ride was NOT smooth for me. I was fighting the bike in every corner.)

Just an FYI
 

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A few thoughts on what I have done over the last 35 years of riding with the same woman. Get her good comfortable gear and a high quality and quiet helmet. I use the Sena 50s communticators which is nice to have but have her understand when they can and cannot be used while riding; twisties no, straightaways and slow through a town yes. No adjusting of seating while stationary but no problem while running on a straightaway. Stop enough to make it fun for her. Heated jacket for sure if not more heated clothing. We've changed our mounting over the years (hehe) from me on first to her on first as I'm still flexible enough to step over.
We've run different bikes through the years and this BGA has a great 2 up ride and keeps the passenger a little lower and out of the wind more so and was the main reason for this bike.
Another fun thing is around here they have date night riding courses at a local training center that helps you and your passenger get a feel for what works and what doesn't in the corners and having the ability to discuss it in between sessions.
 

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I can't stress enough how important it is for your passenger to be absolutely still and not shuffle around at slow speeds, especially when you are about to stop or take off from a stop. The bike get even more "top heavy" with a passenger, the point of no return comes quite fast!
Make sure you plan your stops and where you will plant your feet, do not risk a slippery surface or off-camber pavement.
And work out your core, legs, arms and your grip, you will need it...
I ride 2 up most of the time, wife is 5'6'', 130 lbs. 2013 GTL with RDL seat and large aeroflow screen and winglets, I have to raise it almost all the way up to push the air over her helmet, and still she gets a little buffeting on her shoulders. I got used to look through the screen but in rainy weather I need to lower it so the droplets run off of it. The wife gets a lot of rain on her head and shoulders then, while I remain mostly dry as long as I keep highway speeds.
Reminds me....
My wife & I have ridden all over the world, and we both know what's going on. No need for signals. Or hanging on. She takes lots of photos, sometimes twisting around to take trailing shots. I'm used to it all, and she knows exactly when to sit rock-still in construction or other hazards etc.
BUT, the point of my story is this; The passenger has a lot of power. One day I took a very tall male friend on the back of a smallish BMW F650 for a short errand. At the first sharp corner we came to we were quite simply going straight ahead, until he 'allowed' me to make the corner. So if your pillion is much bigger and heavier than you, they call the tune!
 
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