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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,
This is my second K1600, I love the bike and despite this problem, wouldn't change models.
My first relationship lasted for 4 years until it was stolen.
Bought this beauty mid June. VIN decoder date of manufacture is 12th March 2019.
She rides beautifully of course but somethings gone wrong down below. Rust on the front disks, inner caliper, exhausts and covers, centre stand and various bolt heads. Looks like splattering to me.

I've done 2000 summer UK miles and as far as I know, haven't ridden through a chemical spill! Even a summer road trip only took me to the Lake District.
BMW are saying it's due to lack of maintenance and cleaning. Really?

There is a complication about warranty work because I had ceramic coating protection applied to the bodywork from new.

I'm trying to work out how this could have happened but frankly, I'm struggling. Thoughts anyone?
Thanks, Graham
 

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That looks worse than my 2014, 43000 mile bike!
Have you used some kind of cleaner, like MucOff or similar and left it on for too long?
Usual corrosion points are on the engine itself, how does that look?
I agree it does look like splattering, finish on these bikes is poor but this looks quite bad indeed.
Hope you get it sorted somehow
 

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Live near the ocean? Ocean air / sea fog common where your bike stays moist many days??

Parking it on moist ground where it doesn't dry??

That's some crazy corrosion for such a young bike.
 

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I'm thinking this bike is stored right on the shore where ocean air is getting to it. This is the worst corrosion I've seen.
I have ZERO corrosion on my 14 K16GT and I'm only 15miles from the Atlantic.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Live near the ocean? Ocean air / sea fog common where your bike stays moist many days??

Parking it on moist ground where it doesn't dry??

That's some crazy corrosion for such a young bike.
Yes I live on the south coast with both bikes and both garaged. I did wonder if the 3 month delay between manufacture and delivery was usual.
The bike was delivered to my local dealer in June. I am told that if this was a car, it would have been classed as old inventory.
Guess I won't be able to find out where it was previously.

Thanks for the reply.
 

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I'm thinking this bike is stored right on the shore where ocean air is getting to it. This is the worst corrosion I've seen.
I have ZERO corrosion on my 14 K16GT and I'm only 15miles from the Atlantic.
Fair point, we're about three quarters of a mile from the seafront. But still, that damage in 3 months?
 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited)
That looks worse than my 2014, 43000 mile bike!
Have you used some kind of cleaner, like MucOff or similar and left it on for too long?
Usual corrosion points are on the engine itself, how does that look?
I agree it does look like splattering, finish on these bikes is poor but this looks quite bad indeed.
Hope you get it sorted somehow
Thanks. There's one very small area low down on the engine that might be corroded. I'm no expert and I'm getting it checkout out just to be sure.
The rest of the engine casing looks fine.
From reading around, main stands had corrosion problems very similar to mine. I've read about brake disk rust on various bikes within warranty but they're usually a bit older.

I do take your point on using a cleaner and to be honest, the bike's been washed once at its 600 mile service and I've not washed it yet.

The ceramic coating installer used various cleaners and preps (pH neutral Kristal Kleen and Feynlab products) followed by rinse and hot air drying, prior to applying the coating.
Bodywork detailing is a fine art and this sort of damage is unheard of apparently. None of the products are caustic, all are available to general customers and there's zero history of metalwork damage from them on cars or bikes. Ceramic coatings can be used to protect metalwork as well as plastic panels and painted metal panels which argues against this being the cause.
I guess anything's possible but the pattern of damage points to spray from underneath while the bike is moving.

It's a strange one and sorting it out won't be straightforward, I'm sure.
There's an interesting thread here:
https://www.k1600forum.com/forum/uk-riders/176626-rusting-issues.html
Two bikes (2017 and 2018) with similar problems.
 

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I am a bit confused my garage is 200 feet off the Gulf of Mexico and the humidity is normally 60%min.
My k1600 doesn't look anything like yours. Something else is going on here.

One time I stored one of my race cars at my house and covered it with a cover that trapped moisture under it. When I uncovered it a few weeks latter there was rust on the metal parts. Was this motorcycle perhaps covered as well?

I now run dehumidifiers in the garage.
 
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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Ian,
Thanks for the reply.
I don't use a cover and the bike's garaged.
Corrosion can be a problem in the UK with our roads being salted in the winter but at least we don't have hurricanes to worry about too much, so far. :)
 

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There are all kinds of different surfaces affected by this. Mufflers are un-coated stainless steel, powder coated body parts, zinc-coated surfaces, painted areas as well as stainless steel bolts. The white deposits on the banjo bolt on the calipers, on the brake disc bolts and on some other parts would trigger my interest.That has to be an aggressive chemical that can do this kind of damage and I doubt it is BMW's problem unless the bike was stored in an uncontrolled environment. But that should have been obvious upon delivery inspection. Any affected areas in the upper 2/3 of the bike?
 
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Discussion Starter #11
There are all kinds of different surfaces affected by this. Mufflers are un-coated stainless steel, powder coated body parts, zinc-coated surfaces, painted areas as well as stainless steel bolts. The white deposits on the banjo bolt on the calipers, on the brake disc bolts and on some other parts would trigger my interest.That has to be an aggressive chemical that can do this kind of damage and I doubt it is BMW's problem unless the bike was stored in an uncontrolled environment. But that should have been obvious upon delivery inspection. Any affected areas in the upper 2/3 of the bike?
Hi,
I think you're right that it's an aggressive chemical that's to blame but what is most likely?
In answer to your question; the upper 2/3rds of the bike, excluding the rider are fine. Me? Less so. :)

You've clarified something for me, I think … such an aggressive chemical would result in visible damage quickly.
The 600 mile service was done two weeks after the coating work. No issues at that time would argue against the coating work being the cause.

"The white deposits on the banjo bolt on the calipers, on the brake disc bolts and on some other parts would trigger my interest."
What would this make you think of?

It's all IFs BUTs and MAYBEs so heaven knows how this will get resolved.
I do take your point regarding BMW's responsibility though; it's by no means clear.
 

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Wow... Something really not good happening there.

My 2012 with 105,000 miles and having been ridden through several Montana and North Dakota winters looks WAY better than this.

Hopefully you get this sorted soon. In the meantime, perhaps some kind of neutralizing agent is indicated, eh?

:confused:
 

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Hi,
I think you're right that it's an aggressive chemical that's to blame but what is most likely?
In answer to your question; the upper 2/3rds of the bike, excluding the rider are fine. Me? Less so. :)

You've clarified something for me, I think … such an aggressive chemical would result in visible damage quickly.
The 600 mile service was done two weeks after the coating work. No issues at that time would argue against the coating work being the cause.

"The white deposits on the banjo bolt on the calipers, on the brake disc bolts and on some other parts would trigger my interest."
What would this make you think of?

It's all IFs BUTs and MAYBEs so heaven knows how this will get resolved.
I do take your point regarding BMW's responsibility though; it's by no means clear.

Looks like a salt to me on the bolts. Either the reactive agent or the product of the chemical reaction. Try to scrape off as much material as you can with a wooden tool (tongue depressor e.g.) and store it in a glass viol. Find a corrosion specialist for further investigation. Try to clean parts of the stainless steel surfaces and inspect the surface with a magnifier. Do you see any pock mark type defects after the cleaning? The stainless surfaces should clean up nicely unless highly acidic or caustic spray got in contact with them. Any chance that you rode through burnt lime or similar stuff and then the bike got wet?
 

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As @ViennaK mentions, the sheer variety of components of differing materials that are showing corrosion damage suggests some sort of aggressive chemical contamination. Not sure how to identify the cause, but my gut feel is that BMW won't be rushing to accept liability.

It may be worth contacting your insurer regarding getting a specialist assessment carried out? I suspect that you’re going to have to involve them at some point to fund replacement of the damaged parts.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Looks like a salt to me on the bolts. Either the reactive agent or the product of the chemical reaction. Try to scrape off as much material as you can with a wooden tool (tongue depressor e.g.) and store it in a glass viol. Find a corrosion specialist for further investigation. Try to clean parts of the stainless steel surfaces and inspect the surface with a magnifier. Do you see any pock mark type defects after the cleaning? The stainless surfaces should clean up nicely unless highly acidic or caustic spray got in contact with them. Any chance that you rode through burnt lime or similar stuff and then the bike got wet?
It'll be something like that, I guess. Seems to me that I need to get removal/clean/protection/replacement of parts ASAP.
Thanks for your suggestions.
Maybe the dealership will feel sorry for me and not charge too much.
 

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Hi,

snip..


It's all IFs BUTs and MAYBEs so heaven knows how this will get resolved.
I do take your point regarding BMW's responsibility though; it's by no means clear.
You have multiple types of metal with multiple coating types all showing advanced corrosion. I don't think salt alone would cause that much damage that fast, it certainly isn't going to affect stainless the same way its going to affect mild steel and certainly not at the same advanced rate across all the various combinations. The fact that your front rotor is rusted the way it is bugs me. If it were road damage you think you would see the leading edges all rusted similarly. If it was just environmental you think you would see a more uniform problem. Just out of curiosity, if you roll your bike forward (or backward) so that the two most rusted edges are more or less aligned horizontally, can you see a non-rusted pattern protected by the fork leg? Meaning, if someone sprayed a very corrosive agent on the bike the fork itself may have shielded the rotor directly behind? just a crazy thought, try it rusted edges up and rusted edges down. To me it looks like your bike was exposed to something corrosive. Have a look at 'hidden' parts to see if there is any sign of corrosion where parts are more protected from the elements. Similarly look for any area where liquids could pool and see if there is extra corrosion there.

My snowmobiles which get ridden down salt covered roads all the time and get very little maintenance don't look this bad and anywhere they are rusting it is because there is obvious damage to the parts from ice, rocks, etc..
 

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I am in the UK and got my GT sport new in April 2019, have ridden 7000 miles in all weather and not a single spec of rust or corrosion anywhere, I do thoroughly clean it, and also treat it with ACF 50, I have never seen one with as much rust on as that, looks like road salt has been on it for a while to get like that
 

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I can't help you out much on what to do about the rust on your bike, but I do have some observations. To me you rode through "something" quite corrosive. I think even if you get the rust itself off most of the metal parts you will still have pitting underneath. Perhaps a tank type truck spilled some substance on the road, wet or dry and you rode through it, or perhaps your highway/road maintenance people are using a new de-icing chemical. Many of the municipalities around me are using their own home grown de-icing chemicals on the roads now in an effort to save the cost of salt. These concoctions are bad news for vehicles because they spray it on the road before it snows or ices up and then the stuff reacts with the water to stave off the freeze process. Contrary to what some would like you to believe, these chemicals take forever to dissipate. Unless you immediately wash your vehicle the corrosion process not only starts, but continues long after the snow and ice are gone. Many of these chemicals have an almost oily feel to them and the stuff keeps attacking the metal until a good washing is completed.

Some may ask how I know this and it comes from watching the undercarriage of my truck rusting away before my eyes. I can wash the outside, but getting underneath is most difficult. For the first several years I owned my current truck there were no real issues, but over the last three or four years things have greatly accelerated and so has the use of liquid anti-icers. The only solution I have found is to wash my truck after every outing on treated streets and I try to avoid the municipalities that use these liquid anti-icers. Two things work in my favor, one is that I have a heated garage where I can wash my vehicles and the other is that I can usually see the spray pattern on the pavement after it has been treated. You may want to check with your street or highway departments and find out if they are using any of these liquid anti-icing agents or if they are mixing it with their road salt. In any event I wish you luck in trying to repair this issue, but I doubt you will get much from BMW. I would also start washing your bike a bit more to help avoid this issue in the future.

Rick H.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks Bytio,
Quick question. I used ACF 50 on my last bike but only applied it coming up to winter. Do you use it in summer as well?
Maybe it could have helped with my rust issues.
 

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To me you rode through "something" quite corrosive.
Agree. Looks like he rode through or had battery acid splashed on the bike (or something similar) and it was left on the bike for a while.

Possible vandalism?

Insurance may cover it as part of comprehensive coverage?:dunno:
 
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