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Discussion Starter #1
I know, of course, the various methods to switch it off. What I'm interested in is what technique you employ to provide a smooth transition from cruise to non-cruise especially going from Interstate speed (let's say 70mph), to take an exit. I find that even touching the brake lever very lightly causes a marked (slightly jarring) deceleration which has nothing to do with the brakes operating, only switching off the cruise.

Cheers,

Derek
 

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Open the throttle a bit and tap the clutch just enough to activate the micro switch
 

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Open the throttle a bit and tap the clutch just enough to activate the micro switch
+1
My typical method
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Open the throttle a bit and tap the clutch just enough to activate the micro switch
So you actually accelerate a little (ie: open the throttle until you feel a slight pull) and then disengage the cruise with the clutch.

Presumably done a little before the exit, not as you see the 20mph warning sign?

Cheers,

Derek
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I just roll the throttle forward, it's seamless. I've found using the brakes is upsetting to the bike, kind of jerky

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Not sure I understand this. My throttle (twistgrip) is 'closed' when in cruise. Rolling the throttle forward to me means closing the throttle. I'm intrigued to understand this technique.

BTW, I agree with the comment about the brakes. Too severe.

Cheers,

Derek
 
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Not sure I understand this. My throttle (twistgrip) is 'closed' when in cruise. Rolling the throttle forward to me means closing the throttle. I'm intrigued to understand this technique.

BTW, I agree with the comment about the brakes. Too severe.

Cheers,

Derek
Correct, it feels closed but if you roll it a little forward the system disengages. It's designed that way.

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Discussion Starter #9
Correct, it feels closed but if you roll it a little forward the system disengages. It's designed that way.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
So it's like aftertouch on a keyboard? I think I missed that method of disengagement. I'll have to try that tomorrow.

But this seems like you would go from 70+ to a closed throttle - a sharp deceleration. No?

Cheers,

Derek
 

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The twist grip is in the idle position when the cruise is engaged. The the cruise turns off when you twist the throttle just beyond idle. It's actually spring loaded and make the loss of cruise control way smoother than hitting the brakes. When you try it you will realize how smooth it really is.

I got tired of hitting the brakes because it was disruptive to the ride. It just wasn't as smooth as everything else the bike does so effortlessly.
 

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So it's like aftertouch on a keyboard? I think I missed that method of disengagement. I'll have to try that tomorrow.

But this seems like you would go from 70+ to a closed throttle - a sharp deceleration. No?

Cheers,

Derek
I use that all the time.

As for a sharp deceleration....not really. I don't use cruise at high RPMs so the rolloff is gentle and you're usually wanting to slow down anyway.
 

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I roll the throttle forward to disengage the cruise control. Tapping the brakes or hitting the clutch lever works also, but rolling forward on the throttle is my preferred method.
 

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In the OP’s described circumstances, I balance the throttle to road speed then switch off cruise control on the switch, to make it safe.

Joe
 

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@Derek, think about it! Are you joking around or are you new to motorcycling? You're interpreting "roll the throttle forward" literally. "Roll on the the throttle..." means open it a little bit, e.g. accelerate...

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Discussion Starter #15
@Derek, think about it! Are you joking around or are you new to motorcycling? You're interpreting "roll the throttle forward" literally. "Roll on the the throttle..." means open it a little bit, e.g. accelerate...

Duane
Maybe a British/American thing (I'm a Brit) and I was taking it literally (obviously wrongly). Sorry.

I want to experiment a bit with this before commenting. Appreciate the input. This is my first bike with cruise and it responds very differently to a car/van.

Cheers,

Derek
 
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I balance the throttle with or a slight bit above set speed and then touch the clutch lever to disengage, that way my wife doesn't wake up and slam the back of my helmet with her chin and disrupt her sleep.
 

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So it's like aftertouch on a keyboard? I think I missed that method of disengagement. I'll have to try that tomorrow.

But this seems like you would go from 70+ to a closed throttle - a sharp deceleration. No?

Cheers,

Derek
Nope, it's smooth...very smooth

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I use the close-the-throttle-past-idle (roll the grip forward) method unless there is someone behind me whom I want to alert to my slowing down. In that case, I lightly touch the front brake, which blips the brake light.

It's funny: several BMW riders with whom I've talked were not familiar with the throttle-twist disengagement technique. The grip doesn't really move much when you do it, so I guess it's not very intuitive. On some other big bikes (e.g. H-D), the rotation past the idle detent is much more noticeable.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I use the close-the-throttle-past-idle (roll the grip forward) method unless there is someone behind me whom I want to alert to my slowing down. In that case, I lightly touch the front brake, which blips the brake light.

It's funny: several BMW riders with whom I've talked were not familiar with the throttle-twist disengagement technique. The grip doesn't really move much when you do it, so I guess it's not very intuitive. On some other big bikes (e.g. H-D), the rotation past the idle detent is much more noticeable.
Yep! I certainly missed that method. It's obviously happened but I was probably concentrating on the exit maneuver and didn't notice the point the cruise went off. I'm glad I asked, certainly I and maybe some others will discover something new and helpful here.

Cheers,

Derek
 
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