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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I certainly assume I'm not the only one who "practices" and strives to become better every time I ride my bike. While I've yet to make it to a training class, I watch a lot of videos, like this one, to constantly improve my skills. Arrogant as this may sound, I believe a lot of this happens pretty easily, for me, as it's intuitive. I do, however, know my limits and ride within them. Anyway, I thought this was a particularly good video and, therefore, worth sharing.




I thought I'd post these additional videos, by Dave, at Canyon Chasers, as I think they're just as good as the one, above.
Holy crap, notice the front tire at 4:45 in the second video! I also like his comparison to jazz. I've said, for years, that I like syncopation in music and the roads I ride on my bike -- I like to be surprised with what's coming next. Oh, and at 10:21 into the second video, am I the only one who, immediately, thought of the Metzler Z1s?
 

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Bubonic
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Love it!
 

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Thanks for sharing the video. I also go into each ride with the intention of "riding well". At times during a ride when I don't handle a turn as well as I'd like, I know it (call myself names in my helmet :mad:) and am making adjustments.
 

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Q
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That long curve cut through the sandstone that he does visuals on in the video is hwy 12 in southern Utah. Its between Boulder and Escalante. That section of the road also features the famous "hogbacks" its interesting country for sure.
 

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Very good video. Of course I cheat when I ride on twisty roads. I have my GPS going all the time so there's no surprises on how tight the up coming corners are and I prepare for them accordingly. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Just a heads up that I've posted a couple of more videos by Canyon Chasers that, I think, are as good as the one about waiting for the apex.
 

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Thanks for the videos Vandaldog - great lessons for those of us who are lacking in riding skills, myself included. I’m now subscribed to Canyon Chasers videos. By the way, I don’t consider myself a “canyon rider” but the long and winding road is appealing mainly because it’s the most enjoyable way to get from A to B. Definitely good skills for dealing with those roads.
 

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I've always thought of myself as a SO SO rider. The sport riders give me a workout. That was a good explanation of the apex. I never knew what part of the turn it really meant. I'll be paying more attention.
 

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Slow hands (controlled braking and throttle) combines beautifully with “waiting for the weight” to allow for your suspension and chassis to settle. This in turn allows for you to really “feel” the tires gripping in the corner

Then, a steady to very slightly increasing throttle at max lean helps to maintain any speed that is being scrubbed off

-
 

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One of the things that really improved my riding ability was learning that (due to evolution or whatever) the human brain "freaks out" when it gets to about 18 degrees of lean. Like many aspects of riding, our "normal" reflexes are not conducive to good riding.

Once I understood what was making me reluctant to lean farther I was able to work through it with practice and now lean much farther comfortably.
 
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Outta This World
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A driving instructor (cars) simplified it to 'wait for the straight' meaning if you can't see the straight, stay out of the power. For most people that will drive a more intuitive understanding of the apex. Separately they taught corner braking and combined the lesson as extending the straightaways on both sides of the corner. You want to start wide as that is the best way to extend the straight coming into a corner, you want to wait until you can see the straight because that is how you create the longest straight on exit.
 

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Good videos to see, thx for posting.
 

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Preema
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This guy knows his stuff...

So much of this is confidence, knowing your limitations and what your bike can do. I believe more riders should take advanced type courses because I reckon the biggest danger are those that think they know it all!

One of my little tips when on twisty roads, especially roads I’ve not ridden before is to ride with the GPS zoomed in so I can ‘see’ the next few corners ahead. It really helps positioning and stops me being caught out by unexpected curves and bends. I ride to that with little interest in speedometer, tachometer or other dashboard information. I’m focused on the road as far ahead as I can see.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
This guy knows his stuff...

So much of this is confidence, knowing your limitations and what your bike can do. I believe more riders should take advanced type courses because I reckon the biggest danger are those that think they know it all!

One of my little tips when on twisty roads, especially roads I’ve not ridden before is to ride with the GPS zoomed in so I can ‘see’ the next few corners ahead. It really helps positioning and stops me being caught out by unexpected curves and bends. I ride to that with little interest in speedometer, tachometer or other dashboard information. I’m focused on the road as far ahead as I can see.
Yes, to your entire post.
 

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This guy’s style makes the info easy to receive. His trail braking video solidified my understanding of the concept. My wife and I spent the weekend in AR riding 2-up. We rode about 250 miles or so each day. I was having fun and enjoying time riding with my wife but I was also constantly working on these exact concepts. I picked the roads/routes with this in mind. Riding 2-up with no other bikes and therefore with a more relaxed pace simplifies dissecting my riding behavior (although the pace in a couple corners was uncomfortable for my wife...most of which I think I was waiting for the weight before the max lean at the apex). Somewhere in the past when I was much younger I learned that look-press-lean-throttle technique...and old habits die hard, especially when they still “work” when riding constant radius DOT designed roadways. AR is FULL of changing radius curves with changing elevations that require better technique. So much fun. Such good practice. Can’t wait to return. But it’s back to work tomorrow!!
 

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One of my little tips when on twisty roads, especially roads I’ve not ridden before is to ride with the GPS zoomed in so I can ‘see’ the next few corners ahead. It really helps positioning and stops me being caught out by unexpected curves and bends. I ride to that with little interest in speedometer, tachometer or other dashboard information. I’m focused on the road as far ahead as I can see.
JMHO but you're better off looking at the road itself and not trusting the APPROXIMATE graphic representation from a GPS.

(Also the GPS can't see the deer/gravel/whatever in front of you which you might see too late if you're looking down at a GPS.)
 
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Preema
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JMHO but you're better off looking at the road itself and not trusting the APPROXIMATE graphic representation from a GPS.

(Also the GPS can't see the deer/gravel/whatever in front of you which you might see too late if you're looking down at a GPS.)
I think you misunderstood what I said... I don’t ride staring at the GPS, it’s not an IFR system, to think that would just be silly (even for a boy!). What is is useful for is to tell what the next few corners are, the ones you cannot see. A little insight into what’s ahead and you’re better informed as to how to negotiate it. No surprises, other than the gravel, kangaroos, busses or other riders who don’t grab a quick glance at their GPS and are now dangerously out of shape as they hit the ever tightening bend that didn’t look that bad exiting from the previous corner...

Think of it like a rally navigator calling the corners before the driver gets to see them. It’s not infallible but it’s a tool that can be used and I’m not sure why anyone would not make use of every advantage they have to ensure their ride is safe and enjoyable.
 

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hit the ever tightening bend that didn’t look that bad exiting from the previous corner...
You rely on GPS to reliably tell you when you're going into a decreasing radius turn? I certainly don't. The data is your GPS is a graphic approximation of roadways, not an actual map of the real world.

Like any technology, GPS is fallible, even if you pay BMW $1,000 for it. Ask anybody who has been sent down a rutted gravel road that the GPS assumed was paved.

Again, JMHO.
 
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