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One technique for parking lot slow speed deep maneuvers is a little throttle, slip the clutch & apply a little back brake, all coordinated together. You can lean the bike past the balance point, the power to the back wheel keeps the bike up. Takes practice. Another technique is turning into the lean. If you have some speed, if it's dipped too far left, turn the handle bars further left, she then wants to stand up. Although you might not be pointed in the direction you want, but you're not on the ground.

The best advise, as so many in this thread have said, is to pay attention.

Lots of big Harley riders drag their feet when they go slow, that works too, just don't get your foot stuck on something while going forward.
 

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I’m coming from R1200gsa lc. First year i had it i tip over when u turn a few time. Now is fine but on the k bike is a bit challenging every time making a u turn, knowing the road is not flat.
 

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New forum member here... I will be taking delivery of my 1st K1600GT this weekend and I'm already concerned about tipping it over. One of the 1st threads I read on this forum quickly turned into a discussion about how easy it is to drop these bikes and many forum members spoke of their drops.

I realize it's a heavy bike and low-speed maneuvering will be challenging... I have a fair amount of riding experience but mainly with lighter bikes (K1300S currently)... and I'm not as young and strong as I once was.

I guess I'm looking for some encouragement and positive comments... anyone?? :)

Charlie
I find that moving the bike while walking along side of it in the driveway (for example) feels heavy. And you should be careful - it's a top heavy bike. But when I an actually riding it, it's light as a feather. I have the 2013 GTL with the big trunk and I can slow speed that bike better than any large road bike I have ever owned. The clutch is smooth as glass. If you know how to ride, don't be afraid of this bike. It's a beautiful machine. As far as dropping it? Only once, and it fell slowly onto me in the garage, up against the wall, all because I road into the garage, got off the bike, and forgot to put the kickstand down. No damage - I am very soft! ;)

Chuck
 

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5 years, 5 drops.....Well technically the wind blew it over once. I'm 5'8" and definitely feel on the short side for the bike.
My first investments were crash bars. WELL WORTH IT!! All low/no speed drops. Forgot to put kickstand down twice. Get the crash bars. $600 or so years back. Probably saved 10 x that much. Keep your feet down, and enjoy your new ride.
 

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The only time(s) I have dropped it, other than once moving it in the driveway AFTER removing the crash bars to store it for the winter, was when my wife was on the back 2up. The corrective action (other than riding solo) I found was not to lock the bars over when coming to a sudden stop and paying attention. I'm 5'5 with a 29" inseam so I just have to make sure I am on my A game when riding with a pillion - especially after along day touring.
 

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I have been riding K1600 GTLs since 2012. Had a 2012 until June 2018 when I bought the 2018 GTL. Never dropped either one, and I am in my sixties. For 20 years prior to the GTLs I had RTs. I did drop A 2005RT at a motel in Tenn once. I was so tired after many hours in the saddle, that I got off the bike and forgot to deploy the sidestand. People who drop their bike multiple times are simply not paying attention, and maybe they should stick to 4 wheels.
I think that's, why they invented, Can-Am bikes lol. Try dropping one of these suckers lol. They have one of the highest insurance claims in Australia as most riders cant get around corners while riding them , I would dare say a case of too fast and not enough experience.I think they are a great solution for anyone that has health issues and cant ride a 2 wheel bike, but if that was the case for me I would just give up riding as they don't do anything for me at all.
can-am-spyder-rt-3-wheel-motorcycle-usa-E0DEPN.jpeg
 

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I'd say the weight is manageable if you are riding solo. Add a passenger, with or without luggage, and the bike becomes even more top heavy than it already is. The point of no return (angle of lean) comes quite rapidly. I haven't dropped mine but had 3 near misses where I only managed to hold it because I am strong enough (core and legs, can easily dead-lift 300 lbs). It is to the point that one of the main reasons for me exercising is to be strong enough to handle the "titanic", as I call her.
So to avoid tragedy I am always extra alert and plan my stops, maneuvers and take offs, especially on off camber, wet, painted, or if there is gravel or sand on the road. Once wheels start turning, all the weight disappears...
I have been doing weights and building my legs and arms up also concentrating on my core, so I can be big and strong for when my turn comes around. So far I can see the benefit of working out. See my selfie below.:cool::unsure:
5337161-JUZCKZNB-7.jpg
 

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5 years, 5 drops.....Well technically the wind blew it over once.
So I always wondered what wind velocity it would take to blow it over when parked on level ground with SS. I've parked it good and level but went back to rotate it around because of a prevailing wind that I didn't trust. It a fairly straight up bike on the side stand.
 

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I’m coming from R1200gsa lc. First year i had it i tip over when u turn a few time. Now is fine but on the k bike is a bit challenging every time making a u turn, knowing the road is not flat.
Not being rude but I have owned 2 Indian Roadmasters at 422 kg or around 900 pounds and had no issues with doing u-turns, it comes back to practice turning your head and looking where you want to go, keep slight pressure on the rear brake and use the throttle smoothly. I have a mate who owns the New Challenger and also owned chieftains and Harley Ultras also a few Street glides etc, his not a confident rider when it comes to corners or doing U-turns. So sometimes it comes back to that and not trying to practice riding in tight spots or doing lots of turns making them smaller as you go. I am 74 kg and 5`4`` at 66 I have not had any issues with weight.
 

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Not being rude but I have owned 2 Indian Roadmasters at 422 kg or around 900 pounds and had no issues with doing u-turns, it comes back to practice turning your head and looking where you want to go, keep slight pressure on the rear brake and use the throttle smoothly. I have a mate who owns the New Challenger and also owned chieftains and Harley Ultras also a few Street glides etc, his not a confident rider when it comes to corners or doing U-turns. So sometimes it comes back to that and not trying to practice riding in tight spots or doing lots of turns making them smaller as you go.
Yessir, modulating the clutch, (a little bit of) throttle and REAR brake is the way to execute a slow speed turn. That's the only way I get out of my downhill facing driveway.
 

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Just saying that situational awareness and paying attention are our friends. Knocking on wood now.
Oh, you’re 100% correct on that. The only problem is you have to be 100% correct on that situational awareness and not ever let down your guard. If the bike goes just 1 for 10,000 on starts and stops, you lose that perfect record. :eek: :LOL: Still, no guts? No glory. So kudos for tripling down.

No drops for me in over 37 years, and then had one in a Murphy’s law situation: Pulling out to my R from stop at edge of parking lot between two parallel-parked cars (used wheelchair ramp, not smart), very narrow road, and cars coming at a pretty good clip from over a blind rise. It’s tight so I have to turn bars to the right to avoid oncoming traffic. Guy tops ridge doing twice the speed of the other traffic and I have to hit the front brake hard just as I start out, with bars turned, and...timmmbbbeerrrrr!

Answer? I could have backed up, turned around, and used the car exit to the parking lot, angled the bike to the right and kept the bars straight.

To @Xkneedragger, that’s just an example. I have a K1200S and this beast IS different, especially if you have the suspension set dynamic and you have a standard-height seat plus a seat pad, and then you have a full tank of gas. Very different from lowered suspension and a couple gallons, and no seat pad. That said, the answers are always the same. At 6’, I’ve never had to think ahead in a parking lot, but now I do. You can go like scat, but when it’s time to start or stop:

-Take your time;
-Get your head around;
-REAR brake only when maneuvering;
-Get the bars immediately straight after ending a turn; and
-Try to position the bike where you can start and stop with the bars straight, if at all possible.

Ironically, guys who are USED to having to think like this on ALL bikes, without the advantage of just stabbing a leg down to save a bike, may actually be at an advantage. All that said? Ride and have fun!
 

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People who drop their bike multiple times are simply not paying attention, and maybe they should stick to 4 wheels.
That is an ignorant thing to say.

Bikes go down for many reasons beside not paying attention.

1/ turning slowly with the need to slow down fast
2/ feet slipping
3/ being tired and forgetting to put down side stand
4/ putting your foot down in a place that is not good like a pot hole
5/ soft gravel
6/ going slow and hitting a rut
 

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That is an ignorant thing to say.

Bikes go down for many reasons beside not paying attention.

1/ turning slowly with the need to slow down fast
2/ feet slipping
3/ being tired and forgetting to put down side stand
4/ putting your foot down in a place that is not good like a pot hole
5/ soft gravel
6/ going slow and hitting a rut
7/ Bad coil causes the engine to sputter as you take off with a turn.
 
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That is an ignorant thing to say.

Bikes go down for many reasons beside not paying attention.

1/ turning slowly with the need to slow down fast
2/ feet slipping
3/ being tired and forgetting to put down side stand
4/ putting your foot down in a place that is not good like a pot hole
5/ soft gravel
6/ going slow and hitting a rut
Agree 100% seen a guy just yesterday at a popular bike stop here on the central coast of NSW where we all stop for coffee and rest before continuing on our way. This poor guy had a brand new bike and wearing wet weather gear that restricted his movement and stopped him from being able to turn his head enough to see if the side stand was down. He dropped the bike in front of about 60 bikers, I felt so sorry for him, I helped him stand it up,he told me his been riding for 20 years and never dropped a bike but the clothing was keeping him dry but also not allowing him to turn his head enough and this was the result. One of the guys was being a smart a...... giving the poor guy a hard time!! he soon got shut down by most of us and got on his bike and rode off.
 
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I seem to do a pretty good job at dropping all my bikes sooner or later, I bought my 2016 K16GTLE in March of 2017 and finally got around to dropping it a few weeks ago. Fortunately I've never had any serious damage just a few scratches and broken levers but those minor damages still set me back a few hundred bucks to get fixed. The K16 is a heavy bike and dropping it isn't inevitable but once it starts going over there's not much you can do about it but it's not something that would stop me from buying a K16. All my drops have been while the bike was stationary, once the bike gets moving the weight completely disappears.
 

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New forum member here... I will be taking delivery of my 1st K1600GT this weekend and I'm already concerned about tipping it over. One of the 1st threads I read on this forum quickly turned into a discussion about how easy it is to drop these bikes and many forum members spoke of their drops.

I realize it's a heavy bike and low-speed maneuvering will be challenging... I have a fair amount of riding experience but mainly with lighter bikes (K1300S currently)... and I'm not as young and strong as I once was.

I guess I'm looking for some encouragement and positive comments... anyone?? :)

Charlie
Rode from Phoenix to southern Kentucky and back a couple of weeks ago,lots of wind most of the way to and back.got some gas outside of Moab and was rolling up to the pump and between fatigue, heat and a sudden gust of wind, boom down we went!
Women screamed and Harley riders at the opposite pump all watched as I lifted her back up on the wheels in a split minute and brushed it off and fueled and took off....;)..never took my helmet off either

Be sure you can because you will need to one day!
 

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I will say that reading all of the shared drop experience does make me feel better about some of my own. 😬

I have not dropped my GT yet, and I hope to go quite some time before I do. I also acknowledge that despite all of my best efforts, s**t happens sometimes, and if it does i will dust myself and the bike off, and ride on (and fix whatever I manage to break).

In the interest of maybe helping someone else feel better about their drop, a short story about one of mine:

I have been riding off and on most of my adult life. Quite a few years ago, I was very excited to get accepted into the police motor school. We trained on KZ1000’s for the school (they were really easy to fix and replace clutches in the field, which we did a lot), and then transitioned to R1150RTP’s for regular work and in-service training. I had just completed the school, and so was coming from weeks of 10+ hours a day of doing things that I had no idea motorcycles could do. I was feelin pretty good. About a week into actually riding on duty, I was pulling up to the favorite dinner spot where several other motor officers were already stopped, and about half a dozen patrol officers, plus all manner of the public coming and going from the restaurant. I rolled in, executed a perfect full-lock u-turn, lined up and stopped perfectly aligned next to another bike... and placed my foot on what I think was the only patch of pea gravel for miles in any direction. And promptly dropped my brand new police issue BMW in front of a huge audience. Nothing to do but heave the bike up, dust off... and buy dinner for all of the officers present to quiet them down. 😜

Someone mentioned earlier that motor officers don‘t mind a drop because they have crash bars and it’s not their bike, and certainly it is not as big of a deal in the privacy of the training range. But in uniform, in public? Oh yeah, you will hear about that for a long time!! 😁

I’m not nearly the rider I used to be, and I wasn’t the top of the heap then. I agree that much of the advice here can help avoid a drop, and I am certainly using it to help remind myself. But sometimes, Murphy steps in and it is what it is. Don’t let it bother you, just ride and have fun.

I think the one thing I am enjoying almost as much as riding again is getting to participate (mostly read) the forum. It has helped me more than I possibly say. Thank you to everyone who has shared his or her tale!

Justin
 

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Dropped my 2018 GTL 2 weeks ago trying to make a u-turn in a location I thought I could manage (Apparently not) Lost momentum half way thru turn and problem was I was perpendicular across a sloping road and went down heavy on the low side. The way the bike went down as it hit the road and slid a foot or so I was sure that when I got her back up the whole side of the bike would have road rash. Unbelievably slight damge to the left mirror and other than that only I would see the any of the other slight scuffs. Been riding for 47 Years and I’ve never dropped a bike before.
The lesson learnt here is I will drive down the road as far as it takes to find a level turn around area before thinking I’m better than I really am. Make sure you install crash bars
 
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