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For all we know the BMW coolant already includes surfactant.
Amsoil's test doesn't take into account that the thermostat and ambient conditions, and these could skew their results.

I can see a benefit to race cars that aren't permitted to use coolant products like the stuff we run in our cars and K-bikes.
BMW Coolant may already have surfactants, but probably not. The surfactant does not last very long, so even if it did, the efficacy would diminish pretty quickly, so I doubt BMW (Pentosin, currenly) would incurr the additional cost in production for a benefit that would not last the life of the coolant. They would not want to have to tell customers that they need to "recharge" the surfactant annually. All just to increase cooling ability that 99% of the vehicles it is used in do not need. In the case of Amsoil's coolant boost in 50/50 antifreeze/water, a new dose needs to be added annually or at 30k miles in order to maintain the benefits.

As for the testing, the thermostat is a non factor as it would be open at all temperatures during the test sequence. Ambient temperature was kept the same for all test sequences as well, so that is a non variable.

Another big benefit of coolant boost in cars and trucks that us northerners like is a much faster warm up. Warm up times are reduced on average by 54%. Of course, you need to be a "doityourselfer" as you do need to "recharge" the coolant boost annually.
 

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For all we know the BMW coolant already includes surfactant.
Amsoil's test doesn't take into account that the thermostat and ambient conditions, and these could skew their results.

I can see a benefit to race cars that aren't permitted to use coolant products like the stuff we run in our cars and K-bikes.
I own it, tried it, use it and it works, period.
The only negative is the 1-2 year life span when it should be refreshed.
As others have said, another important item is proper air purge, burping and removal. Heat up, note reservoir level, let cool overnight on side-stand. Mine took three days for reservoir to stop dropping as air escaped.
A radiator that looks very clean externally may very well be internally clogged impacted with debris. 3 square inches is enough to change the air pattern causing hot spots in the radiator.
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
What do you think about removing the center plastic "Mud Guard" in front of the radiator? If I'm only traveling on asphalt...
 

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What do you think about removing the center plastic "Mud Guard" in front of the radiator? If I'm only traveling on asphalt...
If you replace it with a screen of some sort it's an option. Too many small sand size pebbles needing to be blocked to run bare, IMO.
 

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Why is the RadGuard better than the OEM screen on the radiator? It looks like it has similar sized openings. The oil cooler guard makes sense since that cooler has nothing to protect it and it isn’t subjected to warp speed debris flung up from the tire.

Perhaps an extension on the rear of the front fender would help minimize debris being thrown directly at the radiator if you remove the center piece? I don’t understand why they didn’t extend it a little more other than weight or style.

Regarding the cooling efficiency, if a person has done all the right things like cleaning the radiator, making sure the fluid is topped, etc., and it still raises in temp in some circumstances, what if there was a system that would mist a controlled amount of distilled water to the front of the radiator when needed? If it’s the right amount of distilled water it would help cool the bike and not leave any residual issues like corrosion or hard water mineral deposits. It might just be enough of a boost to keep the bike from overheating in extreme conditions. There are systems like this that you can put on your home cooling system to increase the efficiency, why not the bike?
 

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I've read a bunch of threads. I'm on the road far from home (Georgia) in Boston on business. It was 98 degrees in stop and go traffic when i learned about the K1600GT new design feature: i got the Red Triangle and an overheat indication. What surprise. So I immediately pulled off the highway and parked the bike into the wind in a shady spot about 4 miles from my destination...not how I planned to end my day.

So it was 98 degrees and it was stop and go.
but this is my reliable bike and it has been nothing but lizard brain fun all the way from Georgia up through Ashville up I81 to Pennsylvania till I got to that stop and go on I95 in the heat.

If I can stand the heat then so should my bike.

The crazy thing is when I parked I could hear the fan running. So I put down the kickstand and killed the bike with the power on and the fan quit. But as soon as I started the bike the fan ran again and the bike cooled off. When I started the bike again it didnt want to turn over on the first cylinder it was on. It didn't spin with its usual aplomb on the nearly new PC680.

So WTF is going on here? Why is my bike overheating?

I read that the computer will shut off electrical stuff when things get hot. Don't tell me the fan is one of those things?!!!?

I will check the oil in the morning.

The end of the story is I took secondary roads to my destination and the bike stayed cool.
 

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Regarding the cooling efficiency, if a person has done all the right things like cleaning the radiator, making sure the fluid is topped, etc., and it still raises in temp in some circumstances, what if there was a system that would mist a controlled amount of distilled water to the front of the radiator when needed?
Distilled water is very bad for metals. It will suck the minerals out. Very corrosive.
 

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Distilled water is very bad for metals. It will suck the minerals out. Very corrosive.
Very explosive too. It's effectively hydrogen oxygenated to saturation!
Also distilled water is highly soundproof in certain conditions.
If you put your iPhone into a vessel filled with distilled water heated up to boiling point at normal atmospheric pressure you won't be able to hear it ringing.

Cheers,
 

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I've read a bunch of threads. I'm on the road far from home (Georgia) in Boston on business. It was 98 degrees in stop and go traffic when i learned about the K1600GT new design feature: i got the Red Triangle and an overheat indication. What surprise. So I immediately pulled off the highway and parked the bike into the wind in a shady spot about 4 miles from my destination...not how I planned to end my day.

So it was 98 degrees and it was stop and go.
but this is my reliable bike and it has been nothing but lizard brain fun all the way from Georgia up through Ashville up I81 to Pennsylvania till I got to that stop and go on I95 in the heat.

If I can stand the heat then so should my bike.

The crazy thing is when I parked I could hear the fan running. So I put down the kickstand and killed the bike with the power on and the fan quit. But as soon as I started the bike the fan ran again and the bike cooled off. When I started the bike again it didnt want to turn over on the first cylinder it was on. It didn't spin with its usual aplomb on the nearly new PC680.

So WTF is going on here? Why is my bike overheating?

I read that the computer will shut off electrical stuff when things get hot. Don't tell me the fan is one of those things?!!!?

I will check the oil in the morning.

The end of the story is I took secondary roads to my destination and the bike stayed cool.
Don't worry about it. I just made a discovery on the cooling system. The water pump seems to have less output at low revs. So reving it up to get going in 1st gear, mine heats up quick. But keeping it at higher revs like 2k the temp goes down a bar, even standing still. Nuts? Not if the waterpump is geared in such a way not to pump much at low engine rpm. I assume the water pump is driven by the engine through a gear, but have not actually look at the shop manual. I discovered this odd behavior while warming up my bike for a proper oil check, in the garage, didn't feel like riding it warm.

The thing is with stop and start, the engine revs to get going creating more heat, then descelerates for the stop, over and over and over again, when stopped the internal flow of coolant is at a minimum because of the low idle revs. I think there could be a condition if the revs are frequent enough, the outside temp high, and the corresponding flow of water too slow for the heat accumulation. Getting the water flowing faster with higher rev for a minute or so will give the faster coolant flow enough to cool the temp.
 

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If you ran through a cicada bloom I'll vote for clogged radiator. Love bugs down here in Florida if you run througha cloud of them will clog a radiator in a heart beat.
 

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I don't know. For me, this is another "K16 problem" that really isn't a huge problem if you keep things in perspective.

I got the red triangle of death exactly ONCE. A few weeks ago, during a 100 degree day, I got caught crawling up 1-mile of hairpins behind some serious snail traffic. Just as I reached the summit, my display lit up like a Christmas tree. Thankfully, I was then able to blow past the offending vehicles, and within a minute or two, the temperature bar quickly retreated to normal.

The bottom line is that when the bike is moving, heat management is fine. I've ridden hours straight in 110+ degree desert temps with zero heat issues. It's all about moving, which is what the K16 is designed to do. The best medicine is to avoid situations that we know causes problems. Do that, and you'll be OK.
 

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If you ran through a cicada bloom I'll vote for clogged radiator. Love bugs down here in Florida if you run througha cloud of them will clog a radiator in a heart beat.
Yeah but he would have noticed the hyperactivity of his fan since the cicada escapade. He didn't, until stop and go in traffic. An externally clogged radiator is pretty static, regardles of speed, because it blocks any airflow.
 

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I don't know. For me, this is another "K16 problem" that really isn't a huge problem if you keep things in perspective.

I got the red triangle of death exactly ONCE. A few weeks ago, during a 100 degree day, I got caught crawling up 1-mile of hairpins behind some serious snail traffic. Just as I reached the summit, my display lit up like a Christmas tree. Thankfully, I was then able to blow past the offending vehicles, and within a minute or two, the temperature bar quickly retreated to normal.

The bottom line is that when the bike is moving, heat management is fine. I've ridden hours straight in 110+ degree desert temps with zero heat issues. It's all about moving, which is what the K16 is designed to do. The best medicine is to avoid situations that we know causes problems. Do that, and you'll be OK.

I think BMW geared the waterpump too low for adequate coolant velocity in stop and go with outside air temps over 90, and added engine load on uphill terrain. At idle, the coolant flow really needs to be higher. Of course in winter this slows down the warmup time. Maybe a variable speed waterpump, directed from the ECU would be the everlasting ticket. Or just a higher geared waterpump.
 

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In the case of Amsoil's Coolant Boost,...
All good except for when the main problem with the K1600 radiator is when it gets dirty and the blanket of crud acts as an insulator keeping the heat in. Coat that radiator in 1000 miles of road grime and I bet the result will not be nearly as good.
 

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I think BMW geared the waterpump too low for adequate coolant velocity in stop and go with outside air temps over 90, and added engine load on uphill terrain. At idle, the coolant flow really needs to be higher. Of course in winter this slows down the warmup time. Maybe a variable speed waterpump, directed from the ECU would be the everlasting ticket. Or just a higher geared waterpump.
I really doubt that has anything to do with it. If the coolant is moving slower, it exits the radiator with a larger temperature drop compared to what it was when it entered. It if were moving twice as fast, the exiting coolant would only be half as cooled. The system's overall heat removal capacity is the same.
 

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Discussion Starter · #37 ·
If you ran through a cicada bloom I'll vote for clogged radiator. Love bugs down here in Florida if you run througha cloud of them will clog a radiator in a heart beat.
If it was that easy then I'd be happy but I don't think that is it. I have checked the radiator and the oil cooler. There was one red eyed Cicada on the Oil Cooler. There were none of the monsters on the radiator. Nope I think this is some thing else...I think this is a major design flaw. I do not think it is a water pump geared too low. But I need more data. I have to get home and see what is behind the radiator and how the heated air is exhausted from the compartment. Is there a shoud with flappers. Or is it just a small fan on the back of a bigger radiator below an oil cooler with no fan.
 

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Oh and here is what I need to get rid of the center plastic piece blocking the radiator??
Although the extender would help
keep things cleaner, I doubt you’ll see very much improvement from removing the center rock guard. The main airflow restriction is the front fork/tire/fender assembly. That guard isn’t physically touching the radiator, so there’s still some airflow behind it.
 

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The "Perfect Storm" for the K16 engine is going slow and warm weather, its worse if you are going uphill. Some riders never experience this and some experience it a lot, its a location, where you ride thing.

Keeping the radiator clean helps, but will not prevent it, IMHO.

I put a Rad Guard on my 2015 bike and it was the only one of the three that I owned that did not overheat, perhaps the Rad Guard increased the cooling a bit. One thing that a Rad Guard does is get rid of the solid piece of plastic BMW decided to put down the middle of the radiator as a stone guard. I put a fender extender on all my bikes.

If you can't keep the bike away from the "Perfect Storm" scenario then you have to put up with the inconvenience of an overheating engine or move to a different bike.
 
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