BMW K1600 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 74 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
314 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I bought a 2013GTL used last year and decided to replace the front wheel bearings. I have the parts now I just need to get the wheel out and the bike supported.
I decided to lift and hold the front wheel off the ground with a couple of bottle jacks from Harbor Freight and adapters I made. The engine guards are used as the jacking points.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
285 Posts
I wouldnt trust the bottle jacks, sometimes they go down slowly with no advice.
I use two manual tripods.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
314 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
I wouldnt trust the bottle jacks, sometimes they go down slowly with no advice.
I use two manual tripods.
Thanks for the response. We have all probably had that happen. I made the adapters so that if the bottles bleed down the sleeves on the adapter create a hard stop so the downward travel is limited.
 
  • Like
Reactions: dwar

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
I use a much simpler solution for not only lifting the front end of my GTL for tire service but also for raising the entire mc for easier service. BMW makes a part (# 321520/521) that screws in to the threaded space under the small roundel in the center of the handlebars that the dealers use to lift the bike. I have a garage with exposed 2x6 roof joists that I have added additional support to. I bought a harbor freight 1 ton manual chain hoist ($49) and have it attached to the supported joist. I use heavy tie-down straps, attached to both the front BMW tool and to the rear sub-frame (bags removed) and can safely lift the entire mc as much as 5 ft. off the ground. I can easily sit on my work stool and do oil changes or any other maintenance I need to do. Some people have said "this is a u-tube moment of potential disaster in the making" but I have been doing this for years with even heavier bikes without any problems. You just have to make sure that the joist is properly supported. When I need to replace tires I simply raise the bike a foot or so and remove both wheels and take them to the dealer for mounting the new tires.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
I put 50~60 lbs. of weights in a duffle bag on the rear luggage rack to lighten the front end before lifting it while my wife slides several short 2x6's stacked on top of one another under the forward part of the engine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
I use a much simpler solution for not only lifting the front end of my GTL for tire service but also for raising the entire mc for easier service. BMW makes a part (# 321520/521) that screws in to the threaded space under the small roundel in the center of the handlebars that the dealers use to lift the bike. I have a garage with exposed 2x6 roof joists that I have added additional support to. I bought a harbor freight 1 ton manual chain hoist ($49) and have it attached to the supported joist. I use heavy tie-down straps, attached to both the front BMW tool and to the rear sub-frame (bags removed) and can safely lift the entire mc as much as 5 ft. off the ground. I can easily sit on my work stool and do oil changes or any other maintenance I need to do. Some people have said "this is a u-tube moment of potential disaster in the making" but I have been doing this for years with even heavier bikes without any problems. You just have to make sure that the joist is properly supported. When I need to replace tires I simply raise the bike a foot or so and remove both wheels and take them to the dealer for mounting the new tires.

Can you provide any photos of the BMW bracket, and your set up? I would like to see how that works.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,127 Posts
I googled the part # and found these pics:







I suppose any sufficiently strong metric eye hook would work, but it looks like this one has an indent near the threaded portion to help it seat fully and squarely over the existing nut, and a mechanism to allow the bolt to rotate inside the outer cylinder.

Interesting idea, though . . .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
796 Posts
I put 50~60 lbs. of weights in a duffle bag on the rear luggage rack to lighten the front end before lifting it while my wife slides several short 2x6's stacked on top of one another under the forward part of the engine.
And the award for simplest solution goes to ...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
80 Posts
I just stick a small floor jack under the engine with a small chunk of 2X4 so I don't damage the oil pan and stick a jackstand under each of the crash bars and it works great. Nice and stable and safe,
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19 Posts
I made a frame from Black pipe a few years ago to use a loading strap to support the front of my last bike. This would work in conjunction with the adapter mentioned if you don't have expose rafters.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
944 Posts
I run straps from the luggage rack to the table lift. Piece 'o cake.
 

·
Mr.Fix It
Joined
·
6,889 Posts
+1 Meese, 2x4 block and, instead of small floor jack, I use a M/C scissor jack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
770 Posts
Safe Front Wheel Removal

I understand BMW recommend a front stand for wheel removal. It has two fingers that sit beneath each fork leg, that allow the front to be lifted in the manner of a normal paddock stand, whilst the bike is on the main stand. I thought the BMW eye/hook was more of a safety measure, rather than a lifting eye, as the dealers use a whole range of specialist stands for the K16.

Then wheel removal is simple, just ensure you remove the ABS sensor first. If I remember correctly, the left hand fork has a theaded collar that dictates the wheel positioning between the fork legs, so should remain clamped in place.

When replacing the calipers, the bolts have a relatively low torque setting, something like 24 ft-lbf ? (don't rely on this approx.figure, check first), so you need to made sure you use a suitable wrench. I was warned by a tech, how easy it is to strip the threads in the alloy caliper using a 20-100 torque wrench at the lower end of it's range.

Personally, I don't like the idea of anyone propping up a big heavy bike with blocks/counterweights etc. The safety implications are obvious - even if the falling bike misses the human, the impact on one's wallet could be crippling. OK, many of us have used these solutions for a roadside emergency, but not for planned maintenance please guys.

Keep Safe .................. KEN
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,691 Posts
I point my bike toward the east. With the bike facing into the rotation of the earth, additional forces are imposed upon the rear of the bike making the front of the bike easy to lift by hand. For this same reason, always start your wheelies facing the rising sun on this heavy bike.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
Didn't think we needed a new jacking up the front end thread here so here's my noob K16 owner report on how I (successfully) accomplished it for the first time today.

Not having a paddock front end lifter thingy I decided to take the jack it up with a small piece of 2x4 under the front of the oil sump approach. Once I took the little plastic skid plate off of the front of the oil sump the front of the sump did look quite sturdy but, not wanting to risk damaging my new to me toy, I took inspiration from the post where someone put bags of rock salt on the back end but instead used three 60 lb bags of "tube sand" that cost $7 each at the local ACE hardware store. I figured 180 lbs is what a decent sized pillion weighs so there wasn't much risk involved.

I put a towel down to protect the seat. It's a stock seat that I'm having Russell-ized next week so I really wasn't too concerned about damaging it but once I have it Russell-ized I'll probably use a pillow as well in the future to evenly distribute the weight and protect the seat better.

Once I had 180 lbs on the back of the bike it still seemed very stable on the center stand and when I tested it only took maybe 25-30 lbs of force to lift the front wheel off of the ground by standing in front of the bike and lifting so I was sure the necessary force from the jack on the sump to lift the front end would be darned pretty small.

I do have any almost new 2-ton hydraulic floor jack but I know that hydraulic jacks can
"leak" and ever so slowly go down if you let them sit for a while so I borrowed the mechanical scissor jack from one of my cars and used that instead just to be sure that the bike would stay at the same height while I had the front wheel off.

So here's what it looked like when I left and also when I got back from the shop later in the day after having the new tire mounted:



(The reason I took the right exhaust can off is that I'm also changing the final drive gear oil and figured life would be easier with that out off the way.)

Conclusion: This was probably overkill and I could've used less weight or maybe none at all but I must say that it did give me complete peace of mind that the bike would still be stable and standing with minimal pressure on the front of the oil sump when I got back from having the new tires mounted. The jacking technique also makes putting the front wheel back on very easy since you can jack it up so that the tire is just leaves the ground. And, since the wheel comes off to the right there's no need to mess with removing or re-installing the ABS sensor.

Monday I'm off to California to get my seat Russelli-zed and burn up my new tires taking a spin on CA 58 (one of my favorite roads) and then back up the coast!
 

·
Mr.Fix It
Joined
·
6,889 Posts
@Quack, glad it works for you, I'm just shaking my head... :) You're over complicating this.. It's much simpler to just use the scissor jack (I see it in the photo) with a 2x4 on top of it centered between the rear of the exhaust headers. Once raised to the height you need stack a few 2x4 pieces adjacent to the jack. It takes very little 'pressure' to lift the front wheel. A motorcycle scissor jack would simply the process, e.g. wouldn't need to stack 2x4 or balance one on the jack.

https://www.amazon.com/1100Lbs-Motorcycle-Scissor-Center-Repair/dp/B076CSCLBY/ref=sr_1_9?keywords=motorcycle+scissor+jack&qid=1573305355&sr=8-9

Duane
 

·
Outta This World
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
@Quack, glad it works for you, I'm just shaking my head... :) You're over complicating this.. It's much simpler to just use the scissor jack (I see it in the photo) with a 2x4 on top of it centered between the rear of the exhaust headers. Once raised to the height you need stack a few 2x4 pieces adjacent to the jack. It takes very little 'pressure' to lift the front wheel. A motorcycle scissor jack would simply the process, e.g. wouldn't need to stack 2x4 or balance one on the jack.

https://www.amazon.com/1100Lbs-Motorcycle-Scissor-Center-Repair/dp/B076CSCLBY/ref=sr_1_9?keywords=motorcycle+scissor+jack&qid=1573305355&sr=8-9

Duane
100% agree

@Quack The other thing that would concern me is that you are loading the back end of the bike with weight. When you think about how the pivot works with the center stand (the cam action) you are potentially pre-loading that action with weight making it easier to break over and fold. When you take the bike off of the center stand you have to get the bike over the hump of the cam and then it just folds right up. The bike and ground start our parallel but then the front end must rise up and the bike rolls through the cam action and the center stand folds. This is why you feel (sitting) or see (standing to the side) the bike settle onto the front end when you push it off the center. Pre-loading the back end makes this much easier to accomplish because you don't have wheels on the bike. Normally when you have wheels on both ends it will not, you could never get the bike off the center stand with someone sitting on the back, but with no wheels on the bike can effectively pivot around the center stand. I am not saying it is likely to happen but an object in motion, etc.. and once you put that object (bike and additional weight) into motion down goes McGinty. Unlikely yes, more unlikely because you have the scissor jack under there, absolutely but possible, much more so with that weight on the back. Develop a sudden need for the scissor jack and rely only on the center stand and your odds of something bad happening go way up. Besides, be lazy, do it the way Duane does it (and I do it) and you will never have a problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
232 Posts
100% agree

@Quack The other thing that would concern me is that you are loading the back end of the bike with weight. When you think about how the pivot works with the center stand (the cam action) you are potentially pre-loading that action with weight making it easier to break over and fold..
No. Within reason, putting more weight on the rear makes the bike less, not more, likely to come off of the center stand. When you rock the bike off of the center stand the weight of the front is already on the ground and the weight that you have to get over "the hump" is everything behind the front contact patch. The more weight there is on the bike, especially towards the rear, the harder it will be to get over the hump. Raising the front end a few degrees doesn't change that.

If you put enough weight on the rear so that it pivots on the center stand and lifts the front off of the ground then that changes things but that's not what I did here. As long as the front end is heavier than the rear then it's the weight behind the front contact patch that needs to get over the hump.

Try rocking your bike off of the center stand with a 180 lbs on the back. It will take more effort than for an unladen bike.
 

·
Outta This World
Joined
·
1,747 Posts
No. Within reason, putting more weight on the rear makes the bike less, not more, likely to come off of the center stand. When you rock the bike off of the center stand the weight of the front is already on the ground and the weight that you have to get over "the hump" is everything behind the front contact patch. The more weight there is on the bike, especially towards the rear, the harder it will be to get over the hump. Raising the front end a few degrees doesn't change that.

If you put enough weight on the rear so that it pivots on the center stand and lifts the front off of the ground then that changes things but that's not what I did here. As long as the front end is heavier than the rear then it's the weight behind the front contact patch that needs to get over the hump.

Try rocking your bike off of the center stand with a 180 lbs on the back. It will take more effort than for an unladen bike.
With a front wheel attached, sure. you don't have a front wheel attached. Any forward motion will move the pivot point to the contact patch with the ground at which point the front will act as a lever to unlock the cam. At some point the weight on the rear actually moves from stability to lever to help that action. Like I said earlier, its unlikely sure but why even go there. someone pulls into your garage and bumps your bike with the front end unsupported and there is a non zero chance your bike ends up on the ground.

Why..

With the front tire installed the three points of contact form a triangle where the center stand defines two of the points and the tire contact patch forms the third. That triangle has the angle at the top of the center stand very shallow (small), and since the length of the centerstand is fixed the only way to get the bike to get over the cam is to lift the weight of the bike off the ground. However, when you have no front wheel the triangle remains undefined until your fork hits the ground at which point the angle at the top of the centerstand is much larger and any forward motion has to overcome much less lift (if any) to get past the cam.

The bottom line however is that it is far safer to simply support the front of the bike off the ground, it doesn't weigh much.
 
1 - 20 of 74 Posts
Top