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This is the one thing that has me concerned: going from a lightweight GS to a KGT and having to do low speed maneuvers and COG adjustments on inclines, gravel, etc.
 

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I agree...in fact, just buy the Ride Like a Pro video

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And practice. There is a big church that I pass sometimes that has cones set up in the parking lot. If it is not Sunday I’ll always pull in for a little cone weave session. I actually did that last Saturday. Once you watch those videos you really have to practice
 

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And practice. There is a big church that I pass sometimes that has cones set up in the parking lot. If it is not Sunday I’ll always pull in for a little cone weave session. I actually did that last Saturday. Once you watch those videos you really have to practice
For sure. I went to a parking lot and set up the course and really practiced. I also routinely try to do U-turns within 2 to 2.5 parking spaces to keep fresh. As soon as you stop practicing you lose it

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This is the one thing that has me concerned: going from a lightweight GS to a KGT and having to do low speed maneuvers and COG adjustments on inclines, gravel, etc.

Have to agree with the other replies. PRACTICE is what it takes. Slow speed, tight maneuvers are my weak link on both my GS and KGT. For me truly "exaggerated" body position and head turn/eye alignment to the exact place I want to go make a difference. GS is taller, but lighter and the K is heavier and "feels"more tipsy.



So far all good. Real world U turns on small roads are my toughest challenge, so a warm up on a parking lot is always a good start to the day.
 
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Preema
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Practice, practice, practice...

One of my sons has just got his learners and I take him to a car park where a remote control car race track has been built. The track is narrow and full of hairpins and tight corners. I get him to follow me around trying to stay within the lines with feet on the pegs at all times. He’s on a CBR500. It’s a great way to learn the slow manoeuvre techniques. He’s doing surprisingly well.

Perhaps I’ll graduate him to trying the final ceremonial slow ride test we had in the Military Police... Slow riding and tight turns on a wet clay skid pan... Bike down or feet down was a fail...
 

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Once you get proficient with the “friction method” which I am sure is in the videos above you will be amazed at what you can do. And yes, practice every time you ride -look for opportunities to use it.

BTW, I’m humored by your reference to a GS as being a lightweight bike ;)
 
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Techmeister
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+1 Mastering the friction zone, throttle and back brake is the key. After that, shifting your weigh to the "high side" of the seat (cheeks off the high side) and looking where you are going (only) are critical factors.

But... once you have it, you have it. Rinse and repeat often.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
BTW, I’m humored by your reference to a GS as being a lightweight bike ;)
Good catch there Jim. Indeed, that was subtle humor on my part making light (sic) of the fact that we are talking about some serious machinery here!
 

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I agree...in fact, just buy the Ride Like a Pro video

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Or, find a local franchise for Ride Like a Pro and take the class.

https://www.ridelikeapro.com/training-locations/

I took the class the first time in 2010 when I bought a Kawi Concours. I liked it so much I convinced several friends that they NEEDED the class and took it twice more with them over the past couple of years. I practice the techniques in a local parking lot frequently and use the techniques every time I ride.
 

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Or, find a local franchise for Ride Like a Pro and take the class.

https://www.ridelikeapro.com/training-locations/

I took the class the first time in 2010 when I bought a Kawi Concours. I liked it so much I convinced several friends that they NEEDED the class and took it twice more with them over the past couple of years. I practice the techniques in a local parking lot frequently and use the techniques every time I ride.
Not sure if they still do this but "Ride Like A Pro" used to offer free retakes of the class as many times as you like provided they have room available - Great for practice. I liked it better than the MSF classes because it was less structured and they let you practice whichever maneuver you were having trouble with instead of wasting your time with maneuvers that you had down pat............

I even had them get the cones down to a 16' circle for me to practice with my RT. Those maneuvers are a lot of fun.
 

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Or, find a local franchise for Ride Like a Pro and take the class.

https://www.ridelikeapro.com/training-locations/

I took the class the first time in 2010 when I bought a Kawi Concours. I liked it so much I convinced several friends that they NEEDED the class and took it twice more with them over the past couple of years. I practice the techniques in a local parking lot frequently and use the techniques every time I ride.
I wish there was one near me, I'd take it in a heartbeat

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It can be difficult to perfect friction zone techniques when the friction zone moves about on a random basis. Sometimes it's real close to the grip, sometimes it's near the end of the throw... Mine has done that since new and nobody semms to be able to figure out why.
 

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Practice, practice, practice. The three biggest things that have helped me over the years are:


1-keep you feet on the pegs
2-use only the rear brake (and lightly)
3-exaggerate turning your head to look in the direction of your turn.


Your bike (or your car) will go in the direction your eyes are looking. If you only turn your head slightly, your eyes may or may not look in that direction. Cranking your head 'more than anticipated' will make your eyes look that direction and your vehicle will follow. This is a biggee when it comes to making U-turns on a seemingly narrow roadway.
 
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