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Discussion Starter #1
After the 2nd set of Dunlop Roadsmart 3 wore out the front tire faster than the rear tire, with serious cupping and uneven wear, despite being anal about tire pressures, I thought it was time to give Michelin another shot.
The first pair was replaced around 6000 mile, due to a punctured rear tire (but it was anyway due for replacement), and the 2nd one was replaced around 7000 miles (the last 1000 mile was not really pleasant in terms of confidence and ride quality - not scary, but I had to slow down a lot, and cope with all sorts of weird moments due to the front tire being in less than ideal shape). In both cases, the rear tire had thread left for another 1500-2000 miles, but the front was shot.
Overall, I was 89% happy with the Dunlop Roadsmart 3 performance - notably the predictable performance throughout the tire's life. No dramatic change in handling and stability, half-way through the tire's life. High-speed front stability, noise when used, and uneven front wear were the main things that made me try another tire, otherwise the RS3s have been a pleasant surprise.
I have only 200 miles on the MIichelin Road 5 GT. I switched hoping that the stiffer sidewalls could provide a more even wear on the front. First impressions are: not a huge difference (unlike switching from OEM Bridgestones to the RS3), which is a compliment to the RS3. . The differences are there but I have to account for the fact that I'm comparing a worn out tire vs a fresh one: the handling is improved, the bike dips into turns a lot faster, and the bike is holding the line with a lot more confidence. The tire seems both a bit stiffer and more compliant, which is a bit unexpected. The Michelins are also quieter compared to the used RS3s (the Dunlops didn't seem particularly loud when new, I cannot really discern if it's new vs used tire, or a real difference). I would rate the new tire performance as being 15% - 20% better on the 5GT vs RS3. Subjective rating, of course.
Long-term performance is key, though - both mileage, and grip + handling when the tires start wearing out. This has been the key performance differentiator of the RS3s so far: no sudden and dramatic degrading of performance with mileage. If the Michelin 5GT is not wearing out better, especially in the front, if mileage and worn-out performance are not at least equal to the RS3, I will switch back to the Dunlops. For the moment, I have fresh, nice rubber, that is performing really well, and I will enjoy it. But long-term performance is the one that counts. I will try to update this thread once I put more miles on the tire.
 

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I too just made the switch from RSIII to Pilot Road 5 GT. If I can find a tire that will last 6k miles then I will be happy. I would like to be able to schedule my service and tire changes at the same time. I’m not skilled enough to even notice a difference so mileage is my main concern. I ride like an old drag racer because I like to accelerate hard in first and second gear and I know that is the cause of my premature tire wear even though I stay in Rain mode. When I see other people post about getting 10k miles on a set of tires I just smile.
 

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New tire always feels good in comparison to a worn out cupped end of life tire. Wait until mid term with your validation.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
New tire always feels good in comparison to a worn out cupped end of life tire. Wait until mid term with your validation.
That's exactly what I said in my original post :)
Long term performance will be the key differentiator, and it will guide my next tire selection. Metzelers never did it for me in comparison with Michelins, Bridgestones have proved inadequate on 2 different bikes (K included - I took them off both bikes with less than 2000 miles on them due to subpar performance), I had a bad pair of Continentals on my 06 GSA that I had to throw away after less than 300 miles because the front was wobbly at certain speeds (known manufacturing defect on specific batches), Pirelli gives away too much thread life to sporty performance, the Dunlops were the only tire that could kick Michelin ass, so far.
I value predictable performance throughout the tire's life much more than sexy new grip and handling that simply vanishes after the first 3-4 k miles.
While the RS3 was the best tire I've ever owned in term of constant, predictable performance throughout it's life, the bad, uneven wear on the front compared to the rear, left me scratching my head after 2 sets of carefully maintained tires. Michelin took their time with the GT version of the 5 series, and I do hope they were designed specifically for our kind of heavy machines with high torque and sustained loads, for extended periods of time. I suspect the stiffer sidewalls will work the suspension more efficiently and not lead to deformations of the tires, instead. Again, only time will tell.
 

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I ride like an old drag racer because I like to accelerate hard in first and second gear and I know that is the cause of my premature tire wear even though I stay in Rain mode. When I see other people post about getting 10k miles on a set of tires I just smile.
I've never gotten more than 2,500 on a set. Lots of twisties and mountain roads, trail brake until it's time to accelerate off the corner, and then crack the throttle open (not saying I'm super skilled at it, but that's what I'm working for). Sometimes, as in 5% of the time, it's nice to relax and just putter around, but the rest of the time, that's just not what a motorcycle is for, to me. So I've budgeted for a @Gunnert - approved Derek Weaver tire changer after the next tire change.
 

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I made the same change last year from RSIII to PR5GT - and until I read this I had only notionally thought it was strange that I'd worn out the front tyre before the rear as I'd never done that before - ever, so I'm glad it's not just me and it looks like it's the tyres themselves.

In saying that I too was happy with the RSIIIs and they were a noticeable improvement to the handling over my last set of Bridgestones, but I did not notice any difference at all going onto the PR5s on this change, so both these tyres must be fairly similar, and I changed them just a bit before I had to as the bike was in getting a service done anyway and new rubber for the winter is not the worst idea is it :unsure:

I've only done a couple of hundred miles on them now, and not hard riding either, so it will be during the summer months when I find out how good they are and if I get another set for next year. The RSIIIs lasted 6k and had another 1k on the back and 500miles on the front easily, possibly a bit more, but you can wipe that of a front tyre on a long run over the weekend, so off they came ;)

James
 

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Over 50,000 miles on my GTL. Exclusively PR4s after the factory Bridgestones until the 5s came out. I have about 4,000 miles on a PR5 front. So far no cupping, which is huge, and way more stable on fast (over 100) dry sweepers. Major improvement from the 4. But not as confidence-building when wet. I've never hydroplaned on a bike and this tire is as good as they come, but it's more skittery than the 4 (stiffer sidewall?). It'll slip, an inch maybe, and then catch, when turning on a wet road. I didn't notice that as often with the 4. It's not a problem but it'll get your attention. Overall I think it's a major improvement from the 4. Rear goes on in about 500 miles. I'll report when I get a few thousand on that.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Quick update from me. After another 350 miles on the bike, I can confirm that the PR5 GT offers a somewhat plusher, more comfortable ride, compared to both OEM Bridgestiones and RS3.
I don't know why, most probably the stiffer sidewalls help the suspension work better, over rougher patches of tarmac, by more accurately transferring inputs / outputs. Not an earth shattering experience, but it's definitely there.
It is a surprising find, but I've experienced the same thing when swapping from the dreaded Anakees 3s to the regular PR5, on my 17 GSA. I was attributing that, at the time, to the softer compound, but again, maybe it was the improved contact with the road that was getting the suspension to work better, not the "softer", more compliant, tire material.
If mileage and wear performance turn out to be at least to the level of the Dunlops, and that is a big "if", the PR5 GT might turn out to be the better choice, for our machines.
 

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You mention an improvement over OEM Bridgestones. Do you happen to remember what model tire that happened to be? I've had good performance with T30s, but have been debating the relative merits of trying the T31 vs. the Road 5GT.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
You mention an improvement over OEM Bridgestones. Do you happen to remember what model tire that happened to be? I've had good performance with T30s, but have been debating the relative merits of trying the T31 vs. the Road 5GT.
I believe tthe OEM tires fitted on my bike were the T30s. After the 2nd set of different Bridgestones that were subpar, on 2 different bikes (the other being a GSA), I will avoid the Bridgestones all together, from now on. Both on the k16 and the GSA I've had scary moments over wet tar patches with the Bridgestones - going over the same roads with different tires, no problem. I would sometimes lose grip too soon even on dry tarmac - without being able to figure out clearly, why. I think the Bridgestones, in general, tend to be a lot harder, with less refined compounds.
I would seriously go either for the Dunlop RS3 or the Michelin Road 5GT instead of the T31, but I have no direct experience with them, so maybe someone more experienced can better chime in.
 

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I've used a few sets of T30s without any problems, but I almost never ride in wet conditions. Currently my R1200RT has RoadSmart IIIs. Good tire, but wear on the front is a bit uneven resulting in noise when leaned over. The T30s on my K1600GT are getting a bit worn, so I believe I'll give the Michelin Road 5 a try. I used PR2s for many years with satisfaction. And they were so easy to mount.
Thanks for sharing your experience.
 

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My brother would run Bridgestones on his FJR and said they are good tires. I finely convinced him to try the Roadsmarts and now he knows. ANY tire is better than Bridgestone. Michelin Is a great but a bit more expensive tire that fits people who have no intention of scraping the pegs. (Altho you can do it no problem) Dunlop is the tire if you find yourself scraping the pegs all the time.
 

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I need new shoes.
I'm down between these so far:
Metzeler Roadtec Z8 vs. Michelin Road 5 GT. vs. Bridgestone T31 vs. Pirelli Angel 2 GT.
75% of the time is 2 up riding so I need a decent balance between longevity and performance.
I ride more sport than touring, if know what I mean.
Thanks in advance.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
@Vlad Țepeș , none of the above. You need Dunlop RoadSmart III.

Duane
Duane, please make sure you ride them both before being so certain. I'm on 5 GTs after two sets of RS3s, and if the mileage and wear performance are similar, without the bad / premature front cupping of the front that I've experienced on the Dunlops, the 5GT is the sportier, stickier, more comfortable tire.
For me, after only 400 miles on the Michelins, it's too early to tell so I would refrain from being too confident about one or the other.
 

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@nazdravanul , There are times when you don't need to try a product to know it's not better. In this case, after about 3 years and over 30000 miles on Dunlops I can say I've never overridden them, never had them slip in a corner, never had them slip unexpectedly in the rain, never had a hint I wasn't in total control. I have experienced cupping on the front only but that was due to pretty spirited riding in the mountains with the boys and using a lot of heavy braking. Mileage with the Dunlops have been better than all tires I've previously ran. So, to get me to switch I'd need better longevity and equal to-or-less-than price. Price wise a set Michelins cost a $100 more than Dunlops. So, until the price comes down and I read reports of better mileage I'll continue to mount Dunlops and strongly suggest others do the same.

Duane
 

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Discussion Starter #20
@nazdravanul , There are times when you don't need to try a product to know it's not better. In this case, after about 3 years and over 30000 miles on Dunlops I can say I've never overridden them, never had them slip in a corner, never had them slip unexpectedly in the rain, never had a hint I wasn't in total control. I have experienced cupping on the front only but that was due to pretty spirited riding in the mountains with the boys and using a lot of heavy braking. Mileage with the Dunlops have been better than all tires I've previously ran. So, to get me to switch I'd need better longevity and equal to-or-less-than price. Price wise a set Michelins cost a $100 more than Dunlops. So, until the price comes down and I read reports of better mileage I'll continue to mount Dunlops and strongly suggest others do the same.

Duane
In my neck of the woods, there is no real price difference between the two.
And the "There are times when you don't need to try a product to know it's not better" doesn't really work for comparable motorcycle tires. This is not one of those times :)))

Front tire cupping was really bad for me, on the RS3s - on 2 different sets. I had good wear on the rear with at least 2500 miles left on it, but the front was already making the whole bike feel bad as I was losing front traction in all sorts of unexpected situations:
- going in a straight line, passing large trucks, on a wet and windy day, on a B road, doing a steady 60 miles / hour
-doing U turns on ring roads at 20mph instead of the usual 30mph with a much more conservative lean angle, as I was already aware that the tires were in less than optimal state etc.
- the usual windy motorway cruising at 70mph instead of the usual ..... illegal speed, because I knew my front was not ok, and still the bike was not giving that usual, reassuring feeling, with a noticeable amount of front drifting
etc.

So, as initially said, while the RS3s were really nice, they sure weren't perfect, and the front tire cupping and uneven wear was for sure a serious minus. If there is another tire that can sort that out, while keeping the same mileage and predictable performance over the tire's life, I would really like to discover it.
 
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