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Recently, a gasoline station about a mile from my house started selling ethanol-free gasoline. Yesterday, I filled the gas tank of my GTL with ethanol-free gasoline and then went for a 150-mile ride. The route included steep mountain roads, mountain roads with hair-pin turns, two-lane highways, and high speed interstate. In other words, a wide variety of roads.

At the end of my ride, I found that I got 49 m.p.g. To me, this is amazing. On similar rides using ethanol-containing gasoline, I would get about 42 m.p.g.

Has anyone else experienced an increase in miles per gallon using ethanol-free gasoline?
 

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The difference in mileage should only be about 5%. Sounds like you had something else helping you out.
 

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The difference in mileage should only be about 5%. Sounds like you had something else helping you out.
I notice about 15% delta.
Energy Production
Ethanol: A gallon of Ethanol produces a less amount of energy than gasoline.
Gasoline: A gallon of Gasoline produces one-third more energy than Ethanol.
 
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I recently tried some ethanol-free gasoline, but the octane was 87, that's all they had at this fuel station had and I needed gas right then and there. After running a few miles on this gas my 14 GTL didn't perform well, it was noticeably sluggish in all riding modes, but it didn't ping. I didn't push it hard with this fuel as I was highway droning on a long trip at the time. It seems that the engine prefers higher octane rather then the lower octane without ethanol which goes along with the manufactures recommendation for octane. BTW my bike is 100% stock. After my next fuel stop with the typical ethanol added gas at 92 octane, it returned to its usual happy state of motoring. Just sharing my experience.
 

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Recently, a gasoline station about a mile from my house started selling ethanol-free gasoline. Yesterday, I filled the gas tank of my GTL with ethanol-free gasoline and then went for a 150-mile ride. The route included steep mountain roads, mountain roads with hair-pin turns, two-lane highways, and high speed interstate. In other words, a wide variety of roads.

At the end of my ride, I found that I got 49 m.p.g. To me, this is amazing. On similar rides using ethanol-containing gasoline, I would get about 42 m.p.g.

Has anyone else experienced an increase in miles per gallon using ethanol-free gasoline?
Yep, ethanol = less energy. Normal 2 up touring 44. put real gas in out west and got 50.
 

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Yep, ethanol = less energy. Normal 2 up touring 44. put real gas in out west and got 50.
The only time I do it for mileage is if I think I might not have enough range for my current plans. Otherwise, it is a losing proposition moneywise since the ethanol-free gas is often 25-35% more expensive.

I only use it regularly in the winter when the bike has a chance to be parked for several weeks.
 

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There's probably more to the equation than just energy content. The burn rate will be different, and an engine optimized for gasoline will not perform optimally when run on some percentage of alcohol. We are fortunate in this area to have a good supply of pure gasoline. It's a rare event that any of our vehicles burn alcohol, regardless of the price.
 

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Can you get ethanol free gas in 93 octane? 93 octane is what you are supposed to run. Correct? I have not seen ethanol free gas in anything other than 87 octane. I'll stick to the premium gas myself.
 

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I use midgrade, high tier gas here in W NC mountains. If I do not ride hard, getting only 40-42.

Was thinking about adding some Seafoam to see if it improved mileage ?
 

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I think of ethanol in gasoline as being similar to the various 'fillers' put in our food. Its not necessarily bad, its definitely not the best, but it rounds out the product to where they don't have to use as much of the 'good stuff' to make a certain amount. I'm one of those persons who will drive an extra 5-10 miles to find and ethanol-free gas station.
 
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Can you get ethanol free gas in 93 octane? 93 octane is what you are supposed to run. Correct? I have not seen ethanol free gas in anything other than 87 octane. I'll stick to the premium gas myself.
I've never seen ethanol free in anything other than 93. And no, you're not supposed to run 93. I believe the recommended grade is 89. Buying premium is a waste of money....does absolutely nothing and may actually degrade economy.
 

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I think of ethanol in gasoline as being similar to the various 'fillers' put in our food. Its not necessarily bad, its definitely not the best, but it rounds out the product to where they don't have to use as much of the 'good stuff' to make a certain amount. I'm one of those persons who will drive an extra 5-10 miles to find and ethanol-free gas station.
Ethanol is used to raise the octane. The base gasoline used in the blends has an octane of something much lower....maybe 85 or so. Pure ethanol has an octane of 113. When blended, it raises the effective octane of the blend to 87 to 94. It is cheaper to make low octane gas and add ethanol to get the octane up to the desired level than it is to make high octane gas.
 

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I recently tried some ethanol-free gasoline, but the octane was 87, that's all they this fuel station had and I needed gas right then and there. After running a few miles on this gas my 14 GTL didn't perform well, it was noticeably sluggish in all riding modes, but it didn't ping. I didn't push it hard with this fuel as I was highway droning on a long trip at the time. It seems that the engine prefers higher octane rather then the lower octane without ethanol which goes along with the manufactures recommendation for octane. BTW my bike is 100% stock. After my next fuel stop with the typical ethanol added gas at 92 octane, it returned to its usual happy state of motoring. Just sharing my experience.
I've seen the 87 ethanol- free gas, but I've never used it. No I don't even have to wonder. Thank you.

There's a gas station nearby that has ethanol-free 91 octane fuel. If I'm nearby I'll use it, but I don't go out of my way, unless the bike is going to sit a while. I'll go closer to home and use the regular high octane gas.
 

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In the U.S., the Renewable Fuel Standard requires a certain volume (not percentage) of ethanol and bio-diesel to be added to the nation's fuel supply in any given year. When the volume of gasoline sold diminishes, I suppose it can be a problem to get rid of the ever-increasing ethanol requirement. There was a recent push for E-15. I've seen it at a few stations. Regular gasoline produced for this area is 85 octane, raised to 87 with 10% ethanol. It's referred to as RBOB gasoline, Reformulated Before Oxygenate Blending. Just across the county border from us, retailers are not required to sell reformulated gas. Available octane ratings are 87 and 91 in pure gasoline.
 

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I've never seen ethanol free in anything other than 93. And no, you're not supposed to run 93. I believe the recommended grade is 89. Buying premium is a waste of money....does absolutely nothing and may actually degrade economy.
Thank you for setting me straight on that. I was under the mistaken impression that you needed to run 93 octane.
 

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Recently, a gasoline station about a mile from my house started selling ethanol-free gasoline. Yesterday, I filled the gas tank of my GTL with ethanol-free gasoline and then went for a 150-mile ride. The route included steep mountain roads, mountain roads with hair-pin turns, two-lane highways, and high speed interstate. In other words, a wide variety of roads.

At the end of my ride, I found that I got 49 m.p.g. To me, this is amazing. On similar rides using ethanol-containing gasoline, I would get about 42 m.p.g.

Has anyone else experienced an increase in miles per gallon using ethanol-free gasoline?
I never use any grain-based / biofuels like ethanol unless it is a last resort and then I only put enough in my tank to get me to a service station to use the better fuel. I have read that the so-called environmental fuels like ethanol don't really do a lot for your engine let alone give you better mileage in fact most use more fuel than the higher octane, for the few cents extra I fill with the best grade fuel we can get here and that's 98 Ro. The overall cost of a tank full of fuel against the cheaper fuels would be around $2.00 Aud on average. Our Government is doing the same as a lot of other countries and trying to introduce bi fuels, at the moment the one we can purchase is allowed a max of 10% Ethanol so while I can buy better fuel I will continue to do so and I am not that green to think a motorbike will make that much difference to emissions or the environment unless your in a country that has millions of bikes on the road like Asia, etc.

This is only my opinion based on I have the preference to use the best fuels and oils I can and hope that helps the longevity of my engine. Shoot me if I am wrong thinking that way but really it comes back to your bike/car your choice. 👍
 
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