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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I must confess that I hadn't actually noticed this until I read the post by @Sir Arthur "The Cutter" here in which he included the throwaway line:
Small changes from the engineers' box of tricks, such as a changed transmission ratio, are included.
So I checked the manuals - from my old MY2019 bike and my current MY2022 bike - and sure enough the MY2022 has higher ratio's through the 'box:

So it's just under 15% higher geared than the older model (which sort of makes sense bearing in mind the bigger midrange and earlier peak power), but this has been achieved not by changing (say) the final drive ratio, but by changing the entire gear cluster.

Well, well, well. Every day's a school day, as they say.
 

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Can you explain to me in simple terms what the effects of this change are on the driving performance. Sorry, I'm not a technician.
 

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Scammer Hammer
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2022 MI/KM:
20000
For a touring bike this is awesome and will make highway riding a bit nicer. Instead of turing 3,500 rpm at say 65 mph it will be turning about 3,150 rpm.

The lower gear set will have a negligible effect on performance.
 

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It may also make it more difficult to pull away from an uphill facing stop 2-up fully loaded. If towing a trailer, it'll be even more so.
 
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Indeed I was wondering about the gear ratios as I was riding through twisties this weekend. I was hanging onto second gear longer in some of the tighter stuff and it got me wondering if I could locate the gear ratio specs. And wallah, there you posted it. Thanks. 😁

At the same time, I'm noticing a really wide band in third gear. The low end will let you pull through a twisty, then the high end scoots you along the straighter section to the next twisty. Got to the point I could put my feet up and not worry about changing gears for a while, depending on whether you're cruising through the twisty or want to drop a gear for the power.

It makes sense with the lower power band. Only downside being parts availability when/if needed. Hope nobody has to test that theory.
 

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On my 2005 LT, FD ratio was 2.62, I think. A riding buddy who rebuilds that series of FD's had a 2.90 that he let me borrow for a time. It raised the engine speed by several hundred RPMs at 70 but man, that thing pulled like a mule. 2-up from an uphill start was EASY. I'm glad to know the GTL's FD ratio is lower than the LT's but another couple of clicks wouldn't hurt anything.
 

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You won't believe it, but the gear ratio is exactly back to the original 2011-2016 state. In Germany we had the experience that the K1600 from 2017 had a significant loss of performance. We are not allowed to walk around here with an AK47, but there are still enough routes in Germany without a speed limit. The K1600 easily drives 250 km/h (155 mls/h) but nobody came up with the gear ratio here. One more reason for me to buy a new K1600 from 2022 for my 60th birthday.
 

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@Sir Arthur , Not according to the website below; the gear ratio chart from 2019 posted by @st13phil , shows the same gearing was used in 2012.

@st13phil , I'm not doubting the ratios you list are out of your owners manual, but, the second link below lists the '22 ratios as unchanged from previous years...

Duane


 
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Here you will find all servicemanuals from all BMW all over the years.
In German English and other languages.
You see the change from 2011 to 2017 and the again the change in 2021 back to the old spezification.
It`s the original BMW-HOME-PAGE.
 

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I've given up believing BMW brochures. My friends in various BMW branches and also from the headquarters were told in 2017 that nothing had been changed on the machine. If you have the opportunity to look under the tank cover, you will notice on the old machines that there are two air intakes that lead into the engine. On the machines from 2017, both are visible from the front - but one side has no function. Now we see that in 2017 the gearbox was also changed. BMW has also been advertising 160 hp for 10 years. The machines since 2017 had significantly less on the test bench compared to the older ones. Have fun and drive to a test stand with an old and a newer BMW - you will be surprised. Still - the K1600 is the coolest BMW I've ever driven and is a lot of fun. Just confessed to my wife that I'm going to swap my RT for a GT - and she didn't even flinch. Halelujah. And now I will deal with the next video. Have a nice summer and stay healthy!
 

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I've always thought the "160 HP" number thrown around was little more than marketing propaganda. Crankshaft numbers are pretty meaningless. Every dynochart of a stock K1600 I've seen shows around 130 hp or just under that at the rear wheel. That's what, a 20% loss to the ground? Which all the pundits say is about right for a shaft-drive motorcycle. Oh, and the Yamaha FJR puts down almost the same HP (127hp) to the ground, although not as much torque.
 

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I've always thought the "160 HP" number thrown around was little more than marketing propaganda. Crankshaft numbers are pretty meaningless. Every dynochart of a stock K1600 I've seen shows around 130 hp or just under that at the rear wheel. That's what, a 20% loss to the ground? Which all the pundits say is about right for a shaft-drive motorcycle.
I'm pretty sure that applies to all mechanically engineered vehicles. Manufacturers are telling you the engine horsepower but that can be anywhere from 10% on up in difference to what you are getting at the wheel. Still the higher number you start with the higher you end up with.

I believe what @Sir Arthur is saying is that the engine horsepower has been changed through the years and the horsepower at the engine is not 160 as BMW claims, it's less. The earlier models had more than the later ones. Hopefully the 22 is back to form.
 

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I'm pretty sure that applies to all mechanically engineered vehicles. Manufacturers are telling you the engine horsepower but that can be anywhere from 10% on up in difference to what you are getting at the wheel. Still the higher number you start with the higher you end up with.

I believe what @Sir Arthur is saying is that the engine horsepower has been changed through the years and the horsepower at the engine is not 160 as BMW claims, it's less. The earlier models had more than the later ones. Hopefully the 22 is back to form.
With Euro 5 emission standards I would Think the 22 models are more choked down. But It may not be noticeable though
 
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2022 MI/KM:
10,000 mi
I believe what @Sir Arthur is saying is that the engine horsepower has been changed through the years and the horsepower at the engine is not 160 as BMW claims, it's less. The earlier models had more than the later ones. Hopefully the 22 is back to form.
How does anyone know based on real world riding conditions? I ride my 2018 with a group that's largely made up of 2011-2016 bikes, and we do a lot of riding in the badlands of the Western USA where you can ride at speeds not practical in most other parts of the US, and probably the world. If you manage the appropriate RPM's, the 2018+ bikes can rip along with any year K16 bike. At least in a group of less than professional riders. The stock 2018 GTL has a limiter at 132mph, but up to that point, there is torque that will drive you into the back of the seat. It's actually frustrating to hit 132mph at 6500rpms, and know that without the limiter, you have another 2000rpms to redline to ideally work with. Maybe the HP is less than 160, but in real world application, it doesn't seem like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
@st13phil , I'm not doubting the ratios you list are out of your owners manual, but, the second link below lists the '22 ratios as unchanged from previous years...
I’ll take note of the tacho & speedo when I’m next riding my new bike. I’m familiar with the old bike’s 21.x mph/1,000rpm in 6th so should easily detect 24.x mph/1,000rpm on my new bike - if that’s truly what it is. I’ll report back…
 
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I’ll take note of the tacho & speedo when I’m next riding my new bike. I’m familiar with the old bike’s 21.x mph/1,000rpm in 6th so should easily detect 24.x mph/1,000rpm on my new bike - if that’s truly what it is. I’ll report back…
Yes, it should be pretty easy to compare gear ratios between multiple bike using a GPS for a precise speed. If everyone does the same RPM in each gear, what speed do they get? 3000 RPM should work well as that will not be too low in the range and doesn't get to the speeds too high at the top end for someone to test just about anywhere.
 
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