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The reason to carefully measure the replacement oil is because hot oil will overflow the dipstick hole. Very messy.

When I change oil, there will always be some oil left within the engine or oil cooler lines. Adding the first 4 quarts will completely fill the sump. Sometimes I can only get 3.75 quarts in.

Run the engine for a minute to fill the crankcase and entire lubrication circuit.

Fill with the last of the first 4 quarts, and most of the 5th quart.

Look to see where the oil level is with a flashlight, then the dipstick.

Oil level above the add level? Safe to run the bike around the block to completely warm everything to get an accurate oil level.

Add the last of the 5th quart to bring the oil level to perfect.

For me, 90% of the time, that will be all of the 5th quart.
 

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All this may sound complicated, but it is a snap once you are accustomed to the whole sump thing.

Having a sump is a great way to lower the bike mass, to keep perfect operating oil level, and provide a great measure of safety because there is always a sump for the crankcase to draw sufficient operating oil.

Great system that only requires a few extra brain cells to use correctly.
 

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I don't ever recall owning a bike or car that didn't have a sump, did I miss the briefing
 

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OK, dry sump oil system then.

A system where lubricating oil is drawn from a separate container for the engine.

Typically the crankcase also functions as the sump. In that common system the oil level is far more critical, as it also provides the direct lubrication of the crankshaft and pistons.
 

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**Integrated dry sump lubrication for optimum oil supply. **

The 6-cylinder in-line engine of the K 1600 GT and K 1600 GTL uses an integrated dry sump lubrication system. In addition to a high level of operating reliability, it allows a flat construction of the crankcase and therefore a lower installation position of the engine and a concentration of masses close to the centre of gravity. This makes it possible to do without a conventional oil sump with oil reservoir, so the engine can be placed much lower in the vehicle than would be the case with a conventional construction. The oil reservoir forms an integrated oil tank in the rear section of the engine casing. A separate tank is therefore not required, which consequently has a positive effect in terms of the compact construction of the motorcycle and overall weight.

The dual oil pump is housed in the rear section of the engine casing and driven by cogs from the clutch shaft, circulating 4.5 litres of lubricant (engine oil capacity including filter change). It draws the lubrication oil from the oil reservoir and initially feeds it into the oil filter (full-flow filter) as pressure oil. The latter is located on the left lower crankcase side where it is easily accessible. From here the pressure oil reaches the main oil ducts in the crankcase and is distributed to the lubrication points via internal bores. The returning lubricant collects at the lowest point of the crankcase in the sump pan. The second pump supplies the returning oil to the oil cooler initially, and from here it flows back into the oil tank. The oil cooler is located below the headlamp in the front trim panel for optimum air flow. No monitoring of lubricant supply is necessary: if the oil level drops excessively, this is displayed in the instrument panel by means of an electronic oil sensor. ((This is the huge advantage of the K1600 sump system.))
 

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Please note the thin capture pan for the crankcase oil. See the holes on the bottom of the crankshaft area, which function as baffles to slow the movement of the oil from side to side of the engine during cornering. You will also note the dividing plates between each piston rod in the above engine cut-away photo. Again, to keep a more constant oil level for each cylinder during side to side turning.

Here it is again to help make the point clear:

Another view:




How the crankcase oil is separated from the sump.



And then the sump.



These drawings illustrate how the approximately one quart of oil is held in the thin crankcase.

In addition, how the bulk of the oil storage is held in the separate oil sump.
 

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The above drawings and photos also explain why the precise oil level is not important.

As long as the sump has sufficient oil to provide a constant supply, all is good.

1/2 quart low? No problem.

Quart low? Doubt it is an issue, thus giving you time to get to some place to restore the oil level to the full mark.

The narrow bottom of the sump allows even low oil levels to supply sufficient volumes to the oil pump draw.

 

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One thing, low oil levels have the habit of increasing engine temp :)
 

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I presume the wet multi-plate clutch is separate, but I haven't investigated yet, was wondering if the engine would tolerate a teflon enhancer (slick 500)
 

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One thing, low oil levels have the habit of increasing engine temp :)
So very true, because the 5 quarts of oil help cool the engine components.

Still though, a quart low will still offer the capability to ride to a place where the oil may be replenished without fear of starving the engine. This is something a conventional engine can't do safely. A real benefit of the K1600 engine design.

Would I race around with the low oil level light illuminated, without verifying by checking for myself? No way.
 

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I presume the wet multi-plate clutch is separate, but I haven't investigated yet, was wondering if the engine would tolerate a teflon enhancer (slick 500)
The wet clutch design precludes the addition of friction modifiers because they contaminate the fiber clutch plates, allowing the clutch to slip when the engine is creating peak torque.
 

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The wet clutch design precludes the addition of friction modifiers because they contaminate the fiber clutch plates, allowing the clutch to slip when the engine is creating peak torque.
So its a common sump for engine and clutch? I learn these things as I need to
 

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My GTL sat at the dealer for a few months. It was delivered by truck in early January so was not driven for awhile. When I checked the oil there was none on the dipstick and none to be seen when I looked in with a flashlight. I called the dealer service manager and he told me over time when the bike is not driven the oil will slowly drain down into the dry sump and lower parts of the motor, he said not too add oil as over filling would cause it to over heat but drive it 10 minutes and then check oil which I did and the oil was then up in the wet sump at the correct level.

He told me to be careful because owners think the oil is low when not checked properly, add oil and then the bike tends to over heat.

where you check the oil is high up on the back of the motor
 
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