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International Man of Mystery
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Motorrad magazine in Germany shows a dyno comparison of all bikes that they tested in the so called 'Alpen Masters', a comparison to determine which bike is ideal in the alpine environment. The Big K came in 3rd place.
More interestingly, it appears that the MY2022 K1600 reaches the claimed hp and with that supports the impression, that all horses are back in the stable. Motorrad uses a calibrated Dynojet 150 for many years now and it has shown realistic data. Output numbers are calculated 'at the crank' and corrected for temperature, humidity and air pressure as per 80/1269/EEC .
It show two output peaks, one close the claimed 6950 rpm and another, slightly higher one, at around 8000 rpm. BMW nailed the torque curve this time as the torque dip between 3500 and 5000 rpm of the MY2017- bikes practically disappeared.

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BMW nailed the torque curve this time as the torque dip between 3500 and 5000 rpm of the MY2017- bikes practically disappeared.
That certainly explains why my MY2022 bike feels much stronger in the mid-range than either of the MY2019 bikes I’ve owned.

Thanks for the post.
 
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What bikes were first and second?
 

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I thought its UK "bike" magazine - its been running for 51 years - circa last 10 years, now run every bike they test on the same dyno with same guys doing it - no idea if they fake the correction to simulate pretend partiy on weather conditions

they don't pretend to do comparisons - (unless a twin bike test like below) - the point is more around what hits the road, the shape of it, with comments aligned with the the dyno expert trying to inform you of something meaningful

if I did 7 bikes at the crank on the same day I'd have totally different conditions from weather to temps in the bay - with a 10hr gap between the first and the last one tested - and no one rides a road bike until power has gone round corners through the drive train and eventually some might reach the road - shortly before some nanny developed software by a boring git, cuts half of it out

they had a rubbish website last time I looked Bike Magazine

can't find the mag at the moment - here's the 1250 vs the new Explorer with its lower capacity and silly crank (which tries to get some traction and character to be more like the BM), might help you calibrate german lies vs what you get when actually riding - from July 2022 issue

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Two different UK mags are both saying the new Triumph 1200 is less grunty than you want (so needs more gear changes), I wonder about that - I rode the 2018 one and yes the engine was a washing machine that sort of did things - but not in a way you'd want - but the figures suggest otherwise... I wonder if its OK once used to it - and this one with some top end means you can get on with it - I can certainly see why BM have 1300LC with more grunt waiting to release - they are just holding back till sales drop

I had a loan 1250GS the other day - first time I've ridden the shift cam engine - unlike the lies in all the bike tests, you can feel the change over of the cams - but you could learn to live with it - funny first time thinking about that - but the dip in the graph shows it too - may be its only on full throttle its big enough notice - and may be lots of riders haven't learnt to open the throttle yet - as have to agree part throttle the swap is smooth enough ? But you can clearly see it on the chart now I have one to check. And I wasn't really impressed with its low down grunt, there's enough, but it wasn't fun. I guess its the fly by wire nasty throttle and electronics making the bottom end grunt less excitable than I want... Its way less gutless than the 1200LC (had one of them and binned it and kept the old one). But to be honest the characteristics of my air cooled 2007 GS is nicer than the 1250 (or the terrible 1200LC). I came away thinking if someone gave the a 1250 GS or I'd paid 5k for it I'd be quite happy. But then got back on my air cooled one and was quite happy. The old one's are an odd beast, yes a bit more go would be nice, but the way they do it more than makes up for it.

I also got a 1290 KTM and its engine is unbelievable - it makes stupid level grunt down the bottom and just holds a bonkers output all the way past 10,000 power - its mental - not sure how its possible as its flexible and bonkers everywhere - but the bike is hideous in every other possible way you can imagine

back on message - I was ragging my K1600 round france 2 months back and from 90 to 130 riding like you stole it they are brilliant - and it stops - which my K1300GT didn't seem to do
 

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International Man of Mystery
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
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International Man of Mystery
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Where is this graph from?

@ViennaK, thanks for sharing.
This is from the recent issue of German 'Motorrad' magazine. They are not linked to BMW and one of the oldest if not the oldest motorcycle print media in the world.
 

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International Man of Mystery
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That certainly explains why my MY2022 bike feels much stronger in the mid-range than either of the MY2019 bikes I’ve owned.

Thanks for the post.
And if its true that the 2017-2022 had a taller gearing, it explains a lot. I too had the feeling that the new engine had a lot more ooomph in the mid-range.
I really would like to veryfy the gearing story not only as a paper excercise. How about running the bike a speady rpm let's say 3000 and read digital speed and gear. With that I could compare that to mine and see what we get.
 

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I really would like to veryfy the gearing story not only as a paper excercise. How about running the bike a speady rpm let's say 3000 and read digital speed and gear. With that I could compare that to mine and see what we get.
I would too.

I might be able to contribute my 2018 by next week. Right now it is buried in my garage while we replace the eavetroughs on my house.
 

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And if its true that the 2017-2022 had a taller gearing, it explains a lot. I too had the feeling that the new engine had a lot more ooomph in the mid-range.
I really would like to veryfy the gearing story not only as a paper excercise. How about running the bike a speady rpm let's say 3000 and read digital speed and gear. With that I could compare that to mine and see what we get.
the way I just read the other post - the guy is saying the new bike gets longer gearing (makes sense to suit more go at lower revs)
then another chap says they moved the 22 bike's gearing back to what 2012 to 2016 bikes had.

If both points valid, I wonder it the GTL with its bigger screen, panniers, more weight and poss likely to have a passenger, always had shorter gearing than a GT ?
 

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How about running the bike a speady rpm let's say 3000 and read digital speed and gear. With that I could compare that to mine and see what we get.
See my post:

Unless my memory is playing tricks on me, I think the MY2022 bike is pulling the same overall ratio in 6th as the earlier bikes which implies that the ratios published in the owner’s manual are incorrect.
 

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Motorrad magazine in Germany shows a dyno comparison of all bikes that they tested in the so called 'Alpen Masters', a comparison to determine which bike is ideal in the alpine environment. The Big K came in 3rd place.
More interestingly, it appears that the MY2022 K1600 reaches the claimed hp and with that supports the impression, that all horses are back in the stable. Motorrad uses a calibrated Dynojet 150 for many years now and it has shown realistic data. Output numbers are calculated 'at the crank' and corrected for temperature, humidity and air pressure as per 80/1269/EEC .
It show two output peaks, one close the claimed 6950 rpm and another, slightly higher one, at around 8000 rpm. BMW nailed the torque curve this time as the torque dip between 3500 and 5000 rpm of the MY2017- bikes practically disappeared.

View attachment 168313
So, what made them determine was best in an Alpine environment? The torque curve from a dyno? If so, why wasn't a Hyabusa in the test results? In real life, sportbikes are faster anywhere then the old guys.
 
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