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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I know this has been talked about quite a bit. On my 2022 GTL I noticed the temp was up to about 215 riding up Iron Mountain Road in the Black Hills, on its initial 600 mile break in miles. Last week I rode from South Dakota to Austin, TX. I noticed the engine temp goes up any time I stop in hot weather. On the way home temps were as high as 107 but usually were 102 to 105 on my first day riding back North. When I made a stop for road construction the gauge went up to 220. My dealer and I have talked about the Iron Mt. Road heating, and he said even though they realize it can run warm, they have not had serious problems with it. I've read some of the possible solutions. If you think of the way the engine and exhaust sits, if there's no air rushing by the engine, the 6 exhaust headers are probably transferring a lot of heat to the engine. So here's a question: Could the standard radiator be switched out to one that had multiple rows of coolant tubes? And even simpler, is there any way to install a simple heat shield between the exhaust and the engine, in the front of the engine, without restricting air flow?

On my second day, it was overcast and there was some rain. She ran a constant 185 degrees, which leads me to believe that must be the "desired" operating temperature. When I was running down the road in the 102-105-107 temps, it ran at about 195. So even when riding down the road in 100 plus degree temps, it appears the cooling system on my bike is unable to get to the 185 degree temp. It seems like it requires air rushing past the engine & radiator to cool properly. But in real life, we all get stuck at a traffic light, or road construction delays. I can discuss with my dealer, but when I saw the temp gauge get to 220, I had to wonder just how high it might go before the cooling system would just boil over. I ended up shutting the engine down a few times thinking a stopped engine at least wouldn't be adding more heat. I will be checking the radiator to make sure it isn't clogged with dirt and debris, but for all the things I love about the bike, I sure wish it had a better cooling system.

Not to be all negative, I talked to a few other riders who came from Nevada and they rode through some 120 degree temps with air cooled engines. I would like to think that the BMW cooling system is still superior to air cooling, even if there are some times when it seems to run a bit warm.

I'd be interested in what ya'll think of an improved radiator, better fans, possibly a fan blowing heat off the exhaust headers away from the engine, or possible oil cooling.
 

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It seems to me that lowering the rpms helps a lot when it’s a cooker. So, if I’m in slow moving traffic and I can manage to keep it in second (or even third), it seems to help in delaying or preventing the onset of overheating. Sometimes. I think.
 

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There are some K1600 that have overheating issues. Owners know it by the fact that there are no bars left and the dash is lit up wit flashing red lights when overheating occurs- usually in slow moving traffic or long step inclines after spirited riding. If you don’t have this, your bike is doing what it is supposed to do. A new engine will run hotter than one broken in. Even then, you will see the bars rise in the temperature gauge from five to seven. The fan will kick in and temp will stay steady until you can move at speed on level terrain again. As long as your bike corny make it to the red, ride on. All’s well.
 

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There is a huge difference between "over heating" and running hot. I've had the temperature gauge go to the top, turn red, flashing and yet the bike didn't spew anti-freeze. I kept riding until I got to open road where the temperatures backed down into the normal range.

Gunnert added a couple fans with manual switches to his radiator with good success. Look for his thread somewhere on this forum.
 

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Mr.Fix It
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@ReRide , everything you describe is "normal" for the K bike motor. Enjoy your new bike and quit worrying bout it. Ride on... BTW, no, there is not an optional radiator available for the K motor.

Duane
 

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There is a huge difference between "over heating" and running hot. I've had the temperature gauge go to the top, turn red, flashing and yet the bike didn't spew anti-freeze. I kept riding until I got to open road where the temperatures backed down into the normal range.

Gunnert added a couple fans with manual switches to his radiator with good success. Look for his thread somewhere on this forum.
Jim, well said. Coming home from the MOA Rally in Montana last summer, we hit Traffic backed up for miles on I-50 in Nevada due to a major accident. Caught crawling in 100+ degree temps between big rigs with nowhere to stop, we got the red triangle 🔺 of overheating for about 15-20 minutes. As soon as we passed the accident site and got speed, the engine temp dropped down quickly.

I think we tend to panic too quickly when it’s really more of an early warning than anything else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone, I guess I won't worry about it. I did wash up the bike after my trip to Austin and back, and I flushed the radiator and oil cooler with water. I guess there's no sense in worrying about a problem that doesn't exist until such time it ever does.
 

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International Man of Mystery
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I know this has been talked about quite a bit. On my 2022 GTL I noticed the temp was up to about 215 riding up Iron Mountain Road in the Black Hills, on its initial 600 mile break in miles. Last week I rode from South Dakota to Austin, TX. I noticed the engine temp goes up any time I stop in hot weather. On the way home temps were as high as 107 but usually were 102 to 105 on my first day riding back North. When I made a stop for road construction the gauge went up to 220. My dealer and I have talked about the Iron Mt. Road heating, and he said even though they realize it can run warm, they have not had serious problems with it. I've read some of the possible solutions. If you think of the way the engine and exhaust sits, if there's no air rushing by the engine, the 6 exhaust headers are probably transferring a lot of heat to the engine. So here's a question: Could the standard radiator be switched out to one that had multiple rows of coolant tubes? And even simpler, is there any way to install a simple heat shield between the exhaust and the engine, in the front of the engine, without restricting air flow?

On my second day, it was overcast and there was some rain. She ran a constant 185 degrees, which leads me to believe that must be the "desired" operating temperature. When I was running down the road in the 102-105-107 temps, it ran at about 195. So even when riding down the road in 100 plus degree temps, it appears the cooling system on my bike is unable to get to the 185 degree temp. It seems like it requires air rushing past the engine & radiator to cool properly. But in real life, we all get stuck at a traffic light, or road construction delays. I can discuss with my dealer, but when I saw the temp gauge get to 220, I had to wonder just how high it might go before the cooling system would just boil over. I ended up shutting the engine down a few times thinking a stopped engine at least wouldn't be adding more heat. I will be checking the radiator to make sure it isn't clogged with dirt and debris, but for all the things I love about the bike, I sure wish it had a better cooling system.

Not to be all negative, I talked to a few other riders who came from Nevada and they rode through some 120 degree temps with air cooled engines. I would like to think that the BMW cooling system is still superior to air cooling, even if there are some times when it seems to run a bit warm.

I'd be interested in what ya'll think of an improved radiator, better fans, possibly a fan blowing heat off the exhaust headers away from the engine, or possible oil cooling.
220 F is about 104 C, at 105 C the fan kicks in and turns off at 95 C (202F). No issue whatsoever with 220 and the fan starting to run. You are seeing a problem that doesn't exist.

If with running fan the temps keep creeping up beyond 220 F, you can get in an overheat situation, all else is a perception problem.

PS Ask the air cooled guys about their oil temps....if they have a gage. Under similar conditons my various HDs equipped with a gage exceeded 150 C (303F) which was at limit for a good synthetic oil.
 
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