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Thinking about re-doing my driveway and taking out the concrete and putting in paving stones. I'm not that familiar with them and their strength. Those of you that have them, is there any issue with them when you want to put the bike on its center stand? I don't want to redo the driveway and have some of the paving stones turn to powder when all 700 pounds is displaced by about 4 square inches.
 

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They are pretty strong but I would have a light piece of wood or plastic around 14x14 within reach to throw under the bike when putting it on the center stand. The side stand may be more of an issue. I always throw something under the kickstand.

Chuck
 

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It all comes down to which pavers you choose, and how the bed is prepared. On our last driveway the bed was around 18" deep with multiple layers of aggregate as well as weeping tile. We have had semi trucks parked on the pavers with no problems. i had the car up on jack stands which is way more weight per square inch than the bike will ever be.. no problems.
 

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Our paving stones were in place when we bought our house. They're about 7 years old at this point. I typically pull the bike straight into the garage and rarely park the bike on the paving stones. But the other day I was using a new foam gun on the car and pulled the bike out as well. I stood it up on the center stand and I'm always a little leary about it. But so far so problems.

The only problem we've had is keeping the stones straight and level. We have the same stone on the front walkway. About every 12-18 months I have a worker straighten and level them. The driveway is better in that regard. Most of it is staying perfectly in place. But there is one spot where a few stones have sunk a little right at the edge of the sidewalk. Coincidentally you can actually see that in the picture if you look just beyond where the saddle bags are sitting.
 

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If you just like the looks of paving stones, consider doing textured concrete instead. Done right, the coloring and texturing process actually hardens the surface, and you can specify fibermix concrete to make it even stronger.

Much nicer to shovel as well! (Not that all of you have to worry about that, but if a paving stone lifts a little, it can be a real pain while shovelling snow!
 

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FWIW my neighbor has paving stones - they look great but they say that they are a pain in the *ss to maintain. But we are in MN , not NV
 

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I am in Ontario, maintaining the pavers has not been an issue but mostly because I was all over the contractor and how they put them in. I have friends whose driveway is always having to have some amount of fudging done, I drove by when the contractor was installing it and noticed that they had a 4-6" bed and what looked like home depot cheap pavers (thin). I did become a bit of an ass around people parking in the driveway. If I thought there was a chance of an oil leak I made them either put something under their scrap pile or park on the street.. next door. :wink:
 

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My pavers go in this month....can't wait. I currently have a dirt driveway, so I can't even wash my bike, otherwise I'll be washing in a mud puddle. I looked into asphalt (relatively inexpensive, but hot), concrete (durable but expensive) and pavers. It took a few estimates but I found a guy that would do it for $4/sq ft since I was over 5000 sq/ft. The pavers look good, are durable and increase resale value plus it's a bit less than concrete ($6 sq/ft).
 

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My pavers go in this month....can't wait. I currently have a dirt driveway, so I can't even wash my bike, otherwise I'll be washing in a mud puddle. I looked into asphalt (relatively inexpensive, but hot), concrete (durable but expensive) and pavers. It took a few estimates but I found a guy that would do it for $4/sq ft since I was over 5000 sq/ft. The pavers look good, are durable and increase resale value plus it's a bit less than concrete ($6 sq/ft).
We built a 1200 sq ft driveway in Nova Scotia 15 years ago under the watchful eye of a neighbour who was a landscape architect. Excavation, aggregate and compacting with a full size paving roller ran $2,500 and sand, pavers and diamond water blades another $4,000. That’s CDN$ with no labour as me and my ex (not the reason before anyone asks) did it. Costs have gone up since then so be careful with the lowest bidder as the prep is where corners get cut.

Was at the house last year and the driveway still looks good..only a few dips where cars are repeatedly parked. No issue with snow or motorcycle tip overs. Next to our kids it was our best work :wink:
 

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If you just like the looks of paving stones, consider doing textured concrete instead. Done right, the coloring and texturing process actually hardens the surface, and you can specify fibermix concrete to make it even stronger.

I had our drive redone and reenforced on the sides with concrete strips to stop the pavers from moving around ,I was asking about having the drive way stamped and was advised against it due to the stamped concrete tends to be slipery when wet ans still can chip over time.
The photo below shows where some of our pavers moved and have chipped ont he corners of the paver. Its no big deal to me but I do not have any more issues sice they were redone correctly with packing a strong base under them and added protection but doing the concrete strip on the sides of the drive so the pavers can not move.
Sorry I about my Indian being in the photo, but I will add my 2017 GTL in there to show the pavers before I had the drive way re-done. You can see the small chips on the edges of the pavers from movment. Not that bad but still there .
 

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I had our drive redone and reenforced on the sides with concrete strips to stop the pavers from moving around ,I was asking about having the drive way stamped and was advised against it due to the stamped concrete tends to be slipery when wet ans still can chip over time.
Stamped concrete can be spec'ed for anti-slip surfaces treatment (for pool decks, driveways, etc.) as well as fibermix cement, which has strands of fiberglass mixed in for enhanced resistance to cracking and chipping.

Also, concrete can be customized depending on the application and the loading requirement, by designing the appropriate thickness, underlayment, and steel reinforcement. Think of driveways with vehicular load and patios without. That is... as long as you work with a competent contractor, who can advise and recommend a solution that addresses your concerns.
 

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As @Volfy says, there are tons of options with stamped concrete and I have seen some very nice stamped concrete driveways and pool surrounds. If you are going to go with pavers make sure you check into polymeric sand for filling the joints in. We did Poylmeric sand on all of our pavers and I am pretty sure it was a good part of the reason that we had good luck with Pavers. We did stamped concrete around the pool and while it looked good from a short distance, up close it looked like stamped concrete. This was primarily due to some choices we made in design which I think just didn't fit the area well. For our new house I will use stamped concrete primarily due to cost (>10,000sq ft of driveway and porch) and the fact that we live back in the woods so I don't have neighbors driveway anywhere near mine for comparison (IOW it will be more than good enough).
 

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BTW, the biggest variable that affect concrete strength is HYDRATION. The longer you keep the concrete wet, the longer the hydration period, the higher the ultimate yield strength. Even if you just cover up the newly paved concrete with a plastic wrap or tarp, it will go a long way in keeping the green cement from drying out prematurely. This is why the coloring and texturing process can help to harden the concrete, by sealing in moisture within the concrete. Although a lot depends on how the subs actual perform the work. Plus, as the homeowner, there is nothing that prevent you from spraying with a garden hose to keep the cement hydrated after the crew leaves.

It is very similar to how epoxy resins harden. The slower the cure time, the longer the interlocking polymer chains, the stronger the final product.
 

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Thinking about re-doing my driveway and taking out the concrete and putting in paving stones. I'm not that familiar with them and their strength. Those of you that have them, is there any issue with them when you want to put the bike on its center stand? I don't want to redo the driveway and have some of the paving stones turn to powder when all 700 pounds is displaced by about 4 square inches.

It depends. I would not do it on any ole US paved driveway. BUT, pavers are common, if not most frequent driveway paving method in northern Europe. Done to spec, they have no negative effects there. Their advantage is that pavers drain off moisture and water, mitigate frost heaves.
Be careful about the advice offered on this subject in relation to the posters location, and consider only US based ones, because you live in the US. In England this is a common paving practice and I would expect all replies to be positive, same as all other northern European ones. They even pave roads in pavers. But it's all in the prep of the substrate, and paver manufacturer.
 
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