BMW K1600 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Peg Savers

*I DID IT!! I took the 3 year old Titanium Peg Savers off my 2008 Goldwing which the guy who bought my bike did not desire and installed them on my 2013 BMW 1600 GTL. Had to get a bit longer hex head screw ( 25 mm ) but, they installed quickly. Here are some pictures. THEY WORK!!! I got sparklers again!!

*This kind of important because the pegs on the 1600 are a bit expensive from BMW- $ 86.54/ ea ( A&S BMW Motorcycles Microfiche ).

If you are like me I love the twistys and often drag my pegs then, Peg Savers ( PepsX )will save you from having to replace your pegs. There are three kinds: Aluminum (cheep and grind away quickly), Stainless (last a bit longer) and my favorite, TITANIUM (last the longest and make the best sparks). An old riding buddy when I had my Goldwing, DJFire & his friend PepsX who are Goldwing Tournament riders came up with the idea. I have no financial interest & receive no compensation from their company. Yes, I have the Verholen Foot Peg Lowering Kit so, my pegs are about one inch lower than standard OEM. It makes riding much more comfortable. Now I can Spark Again. Here are some pictures. Best,

DOC:gm:gm
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,019 Posts
I never understood trying to get things to touch down on purpose. It's like putting on louder pipes just so it feels like you're going "faster" . . .

My goal is to get through the twisty section as expediently as possible without anything dragging the ground. Smoothness, skill, and control always wins, and is much safer to boot . . . :cool:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
248 Posts
Touching down on a heavy tourer should be a warning that you have exhausted almost all of the traction available and are very close to throwing it down the road - dependent on conditions, tires, skill level.

There isn't anything wrong with dragging a peg as long as you understand that you are approaching a limit - either yours, the tires, or the bike.

My goal is to get through my favorite roads as quickly as possible without grinding anything on my bike. Body position, throttle control and quick transition speed will help you avoid the sparks. ;)

If I see sparks from one of my riding partners, I'll know that he made an error and had to use up his safety margin.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,019 Posts
I remember riding with a friend who had a K12LT just like mine. He was scraping on pretty much every corner, and I never touched down once. Same roads, same speeds, same bikes, just different skill levels. We talked about it afterwards, and he was amazed that I wasn't scraping just as bad as he was . . . :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,230 Posts
It took three sets of tyres, before changing to the new A spec Pirelli Angel GT's, before I could get the pegs to touch down. There are no chicken strips on my tyres. Yes I ride all the way to the sidewall. Does it feel anything other than safe? No. It feels just as planted as it does upright.

Dropping the pegs by an inch as the OP has, would mean scrapping a peg would be well with in the limits of both the tyres and the bike. I think if I'dowered my pegs, I'd put similar kit under them too.


Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
252 Posts
I never understood trying to get things to touch down on purpose. It's like putting on louder pipes just so it feels like you're going "faster" . . .

My goal is to get through the twisty section as expediently as possible without anything dragging the ground. Smoothness, skill, and control always wins, and is much safer to boot . . . :cool:
+1 :k16: safe and sound
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,019 Posts
Dropping the pegs by an inch as the OP has, would mean scrapping a peg would be well with in the limits of both the tyres and the bike.
Depends on how you define "limits".

Pegs have some give in them, so they can fold back if touched to the ground. That gives you a little warning window, telling you that something else is going to touch down next. Usually, it's some other hard parts like the centerstand, frame or crash bars, or even the peg extenders that don't give, and will cause the bike to lever up until one or both tires loses traction. That's when Very Bad Things occur.

Doesn't matter how sticky your tires are, or what lean angle you're at, if you drag something hard enough to lift a wheel, you're gonna go down.

Sure, with the lowered GTL pegs, they're gonna scrape well before you reach the limits of traction on modern street tires. But what if, while leaned over and scraping away, you hit a slick section? Or gravel? Or a sudden dip? Or a wet paint line?

What you've done is used up whatever available safety margin you have making pretty sparks, so that if something else occurs, you have nothing left, thus drastically increasing the chance of a crash.

Sure, the vast majority of the time you'll be just fine, and will roll on through without incident. And most of the time you could ride along just fine in a t-shirt and shorts, for that matter. But that one time things suddenly go all weird, that small safety margin will keep you from having to test out your safety gear . . .
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,105 Posts
Depends on how you define "limits".

Pegs have some give in them, so they can fold back if touched to the ground. That gives you a little warning window, telling you that something else is going to touch down next. Usually, it's some other hard parts like the centerstand, frame or crash bars, or even the peg extenders that don't give, and will cause the bike to lever up until one or both tires loses traction. That's when Very Bad Things occur.

Doesn't matter how sticky your tires are, or what lean angle you're at, if you drag something hard enough to lift a wheel, you're gonna go down.

Sure, with the lowered GTL pegs, they're gonna scrape well before you reach the limits of traction on modern street tires. But what if, while leaned over and scraping away, you hit a slick section? Or gravel? Or a sudden dip? Or a wet paint line?

What you've done is used up whatever available safety margin you have making pretty sparks, so that if something else occurs, you have nothing left, thus drastically increasing the chance of a crash.

Sure, the vast majority of the time you'll be just fine, and will roll on through without incident. And most of the time you could ride along just fine in a t-shirt and shorts, for that matter. But that one time things suddenly go all weird, that small safety margin will keep you from having to test out your safety gear . . .
I prefer to stay in that safety margin. In my younger days, I had my fun. Ignorance was bliss. Now, at my age, it takes much longer to heal.:)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
PegSavers

Just letting you guys know the product fits the BMW 1600. Appreciate your concerns. To each their own. Ride your own ride! Best,

Doc:gm:gm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
Do you have pics of the install from the bottom? I bought some but they don't fit flush where the peg turns up. Thanks

86Magna
"The mountains are calling I must go"
John Muir
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Peg Savers

You are correct. The peg savers do not set exactly flush with the bottom of the peg mount. There is about 2 to 3 mm of extension in the front and rear. However, once mounted they are obscured by the footrest rubber that covers the peg & device/ peg saver (A&S BMW Motorcycles Microfiche). Did not take pictures of the install but, if there is interest I can go back and show you guys how easy the peg savers are to install. Best,

DOC:gm:gm
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
6,409 Posts
These look great and surely add to the thrill of draggin a peg. I too thought dragging pegs was a badge of honor to be obtained whenever the opportunity presented itself. That line of thinking changed for me in '07 when leading 5 bikes on a road trip from northern Virginia to Illinois. While traveling through the Maryland panhandle section I encountered a stretch of awesome sweepers and picked up the pace, leftttt, righttt, and then I came upon a sharp downhill left hander. The corner is decreasing radius and all is going well...until I hit an off-camber section in my lane; now I'm riding on the frame for about 50 yards, no titanium peg sliders required for sparks.... I finally ran out of talent and came off the bike. Bike not too, me? spiral fracture L fibula. I have a plate there to remind me everyday that the "badge of honor" just wasn't worth it...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
340 Posts
I wanted them more to warn me that I'm going too far. Since GTL doesn't have them to start with, the extra half inch is a better safety reminder than the foot peg itself. Sometimes I get too spirited and it would be nice to have the added reminder to slow it down. Staying in control is my highest goal.

Funny no one gave RL this much or I should say this type of advice when he made his magnesium peg sliders. http://www.k1600forum.com/forum/showthread.php?p=68638

86Magna
"The mountains are calling I must go"
John Muir
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #14
Peg Savers

86 Magna has it correct. He has hit the point. Not often but sometimes you hit a switch back where the road is sloped upward on the turn side. The peg will hit and lift warning you that is about as much lean to the bike you need to be doing. The Peg Saver saves your pegs and adds the feature of sparks/ sparkles coming off the bike. It does look pretty cool. Gunnert, sorry to hear about your adverse event. Sharp downhill switch backs are notorious for an uneven road. Best,

DOC:clap::clap:
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,218 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Peg Savers

There appears to be some interest in these Peg Savers so, as requested I have put together Installation Instructions for the BMW 1600GTL:

Installation of Peg Savers

Peg Savers are product developed for the Honda Goldwing. They can save your pegs. There are three varieties: Aluminum, Steel & Titanium (PepsX ). The Titanium Pegs produce the brightest sparks and last the longest.
You will need to purchase two additional items before install. A washer with a 10 mm center hole/15 mm outside diameter & two M5*25 Flat Head Hex screws (image 1). Remove the lateral/ outside ISA M5*12 screw from the bottom of the Footrest Rubber ( A&S BMW Motorcycles Microfiche ). Put on the Peg Saver by screwing in one M5*25 screw in the lateral/ outside hole on the bottom of the Driver Footrest through the lateral/ outside hole on the Peg Saver. Keep it a bit loose. Leave the other M5*12 screw near the bike frame in place & the Footrest Rubber on the Driver Footrest. Position the Peg saver so, it is centered on bottom of the Driver Footrest but covered by the Footrest Rubber. Anticipate about 2 mm of over extension of the Peg Saver on the bottom of the Driver Footrest anteriorly and posteriorly. These parts of the Peg Savers are usually covered by the Footrest Rubber. Remember the front of the Peg Saver will touch down first. Mark the center whole of the Peg Saver on the bottom of the Driver Footrest (image 2).
Remove the Peg Saver & Footrest Rubber by unscrewing the ISA M5*12 & M5*25 screws. Drill from the bottom of the Driver Footrest with a 3/8 inch drill bit where you made your mark with the Footrest Rubber off. You usually do not have to remove the Driver Footrest from the bike as long as you are careful. Now from from top of the Driver Footrest with the Footrest Rubber off enlarge the drill whole by utilizing progressively larger drill bits to a 10 mm whole (image 3). Blow away the aluminum shavings. Replace the Peg Saver on the bottom of the Driver Footrest. From the top of the Driver Footrest through the hole you have just made screw in the large screw provided with the Peg Saver with a washer in place. Tighten utilizing another allen wrench through the lateral/ outside hole (image 4). Replace the Footrest Rubber making sure to align the bracket ( A&S BMW Motorcycles Microfiche ). Screw in the M5*25 screw in the lateral/ outside hole & the M5*12 screw near the bike frame from the bottom of the Driver Footrest securing the Footrest Rubber. You are done (image 5), Enjoy!! Best,

DOC:gm:gm
 

Attachments

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
16,921 Posts
Great option for the GTL.

I took my bar of titanium to the welder to make some sets of sliders to replace the OE GT slider.

Let's see how much they cost to make. These will be as long as the OE peg slider, but more than a cm wide.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
239 Posts
I remember going through the Pyrenees ( for you US types that's a range of mountains between France and Spain) behind a pal who had a stock Pan European. He was sending up sparks on roads that had a sheer drop of 1000 feet or more. I was on a K1100 trying to keep up and praying to God that Pirelli knew what they were up to!!

As some have said, if you're sending up sparks on a tourer you are brave/stupid/super-human/brilliant.....delete as required lol.

BTW...just watched a TV series by one of our M/C dudes over here, Henry Cole, about riding Boston downwards and also Route 66. Awesome...you have some GREAT motorcycling experiences over there. Fair play to you all.
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top