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Petrol isn't too good at raising my blood sugar when it gets low, so I keep CapriSun juice drinks in the garage fridge for such times.
 

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How did this straw end up in the fuel tank? Inquiring minds need to know or speculation will go rampant.
 

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If that plastic softens in gasoline then it could block the tank outlet filter. If it dissolves then it could block the injectors. Check how the straw material responds to gasoline as already said above. Better to know what you are dealing with.

Sent from my G8441 using Tapatalk
 

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FYI, most plastic straws are made of polypropylene, portable gas cans are made of polypropylene.... Again, don't worry about it, ride. :)

Duane
 

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The first plastic straws were made using toxic polystyrene (#6), but now safer polypropylene (#5) or polyethylene (#2) is favored over polystyrene, because polystyrene is brittle and tends to crack easily (just like the famous red Solo-type cups). One anecdotal way you can tell what type of straw you're drinking from is to see whether it sinks or floats: polystyrene is denser than water, causing straws to sink when placed into liquids. Polypropylene straws are much more flexible, durable and do not sink. Of course, this method is not fool-proof so if in doubt, contact the manufacturer directly to find out what materials are used.

Alcohol will damage some plastics, but not all. I will list my answers by the resin code, or "recycling symbol", found on most plastic items:

  1. Poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET or PETE - PET is not very soluble in ethanol or isopropanol, but prolonged exposure may cause crazing or stiffening due to the dissolution of plasticizers.
  2. High-Density polyethylene, HDPE - HDPE is resistant to most things.
  3. Poly(vinyl chloride), PVC - PVC is not very soluble in ethanol or isopropanol, but prolonged exposure may cause crazing or stiffening.
  4. Low-Density polyethylene, LDPE - LDPE is resistant to most things.
  5. Polypropylene, PP - PP is resistant to most things.
  6. Polystyrene PS - PS is not very soluble in ethanol or isopropanol, but prolonged exposure may cause crazing or stiffening.
 

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I would also suggest to avoid using a shop vac to remove the straw. Shop vac will do a little spark meets gas dance once the gas gets up that hose and then you would be in a world of hurt.
Please avoid that
 
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