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Darwin Awards is full of similar attempts to remove yourself from the gene pool......
 

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The first plastic straws were made using toxic polystyrene (#6), but now safer polypropylene (#5) or polyethylene (#2) is favored over polystyrene, because polystyrene is brittle and tends to crack easily (just like the famous red Solo-type cups). One anecdotal way you can tell what type of straw you're drinking from is to see whether it sinks or floats: polystyrene is denser than water, causing straws to sink when placed into liquids. Polypropylene straws are much more flexible, durable and do not sink. Of course, this method is not fool-proof so if in doubt, contact the manufacturer directly to find out what materials are used.

Alcohol will damage some plastics, but not all. I will list my answers by the resin code, or "recycling symbol", found on most plastic items:

  1. Poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET or PETE - PET is not very soluble in ethanol or isopropanol, but prolonged exposure may cause crazing or stiffening due to the dissolution of plasticizers.
  2. High-Density polyethylene, HDPE - HDPE is resistant to most things.
  3. Poly(vinyl chloride), PVC - PVC is not very soluble in ethanol or isopropanol, but prolonged exposure may cause crazing or stiffening.
  4. Low-Density polyethylene, LDPE - LDPE is resistant to most things.
  5. Polypropylene, PP - PP is resistant to most things.
  6. Polystyrene PS - PS is not very soluble in ethanol or isopropanol, but prolonged exposure may cause crazing or stiffening.
Hmmm, which type of plastic barrels did Walt and Jesse use to dispose of bodies? If it's THAT type of plastic then as @Gunnert said, don't worry about it.
 

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Empty tank, mini shop vac with adopted skinny plastic tube, flashlight on and just fish the straw. Now, be careful not to drop the flashlight 😁. Happy riding.....!!!!!
 

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Darwin Awards is full of similar attempts to remove yourself from the gene pool......
Speaking of sucking out gas with a shop vac, one of my favorite Darwin awards went to the JATO-equipped Chevy Impala driver. From 1995, it's still in the archives linked above.
 

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Get the same type straw you dropped into the tank and see if Techron melts it down into solution. If it does, put a few tanks topped off with Techron through, and that should be it.
 

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I would also suggest to avoid using a shop vac to remove the straw. Shop vac will do a little spark meets gas dance once the gas gets up that hose and then you would be in a world of hurt.
Please avoid that
But, if you do try that be sure to do it outside in your driveway with a video camera rolling. It would surely go viral!
 

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It must be winter. 31 posts on a straw...and no one even asked how or why a straw got in there to begin with.

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Actually, it has been asked. I just figured it was something so embarrassing that @beemer99 is taking his time in coming up with his story. That said, you are right, it's winter and my bike is feeling terribly neglected.
 

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My shop vac has a 6' long hose attached to it. Never seen sparks fly out of it when cleaning the leaves around my car engine. Some of y'all must have a turbo-charged "car vac" that doubles as a grill lighter...

My two cents is that I would want to get it out if it is not one of those that will disintegrate cleanly. I've experienced issues with contaminants in fuel before (more than once) and it is not fun having clogged injectors because it always happens at a bad time. Your filter/strainer should keep you ok in the short run. A flexible "claw" pick tool will probably work best as some have suggested - as you'd have to get the air-flow right through the tank for suction to work well (unless you had one of those suction-jobs dentist's use that can pull your lip off). Have fun.
 

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My shop vac has a 6' long hose attached to it. Never seen sparks fly out of it when cleaning the leaves around my car engine. Some of y'all must have a turbo-charged "car vac" that doubles as a grill lighter...

My two cents is that I would want to get it out if it is not one of those that will disintegrate cleanly. I've experienced issues with contaminants in fuel before (more than once) and it is not fun having clogged injectors because it always happens at a bad time. Your filter/strainer should keep you ok in the short run. A flexible "claw" pick tool will probably work best as some have suggested - as you'd have to get the air-flow right through the tank for suction to work well (unless you had one of those suction-jobs dentist's use that can pull your lip off). Have fun.
Have you tried cleaning our your car's fuel tank with it? Have a friend video that for us.
 

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pick up bike , flip it upside down and start shaking it out.
 

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Tank the tank off. It's not too hard to do. Had to do it recently to replace the clutch switch.

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