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2012 K1600 GTL
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am really enjoying this motorcycle, I love to ride and get to ride year round here in Eastern Virginia. I am still in the Honeymoon phase with this motorcycle but I can tell you it has me wanting to get on it and ride. Today I went out to the parking lot and put this big old girl through some tight cone patterns. Don't let anyone tell you these bikes are to top heavy or not set up to make tight turns. The same techniques I use on my Harley-Davidson are the same techniques used on any motorcycle. Head and eye placement, friction zone an a little rear brake. Here is a video of me in a few patterns, 12' slow cone weave, goofy offset cone weave, 18x36 figure 8's and an 18 foot U-turn. Sorry the video isn't in landscape, first video I have uploaded to YouTube.
 

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K1600GA
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We almost have enough of a population of rider coaches to create a subgroup here.
 
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U have me beat I can do that with my R1200 GSA but not the K1600GTL.
Nice work
 
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People think you have to drag hard parts to make tight turns, you don't.
Well done!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
People think you have to drag hard parts to make tight turns, you don't.
Well done!
Jonnybow, Thank you and you are correct. Dragging hard parts is a big sign you are not turning your handlebars and compensating by leaning. On my HD I can drag my boards all day long doing an 18 foot U-turn or I can do a 15' U-turn without dragging my boards, it all depends on how much I turn the bars. I can tell you most riders will never turn their bars to full lock, it is not natural.
 

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RLAPVA

I was going to ask Jerry this question but maybe U can answer it.

It's great that we can make tight turns and figure eights but there is more that we don't practice.
Have U ever had debris on the road in front of u and raised the front end to go over it?
Should we practice that? Should we practice trail braking into corners and repoint the motorcycle for a better exit line?

I've been riding motorcycles for 55 years each skill set has relevance but what are the really important skill sets.

What R your thoughts?

Ian
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
@flyjets Ian,
I agree there is WAY MORE we don't practice. I will be the first to tell anyone that comes to my class. Do not make this your only class, I recommend other schools in this skillset and all skill sets. I have been taking classes and practicing with some of the best (Slow Speed) riders in the country. This does not mean that my class is the be all end all to training. I am scheduled to take the California Superbike class this year, and next year I want to take the BMW course in South Carolina.

But what I can tell you, the more we practice the better we become. Since learning the slow speed skill set, it has made me a better rider on the street. Many of the skills that are used in slow speed are also used in day to day riding. I have been riding for 42 years and and on the street for 34 years. I did not really know how to ride correctly until about 5 years ago, since then I can't get enough training.

Unfortunately any monkey can go fast in a straight line. Add a tight turn, or as you asked an obstacle in the middle of a tight blind corner, How will the rider react. My first question would be, What is the riders corner speed? If the rider cannot see through the corner then maybe his/her corner speed was to fast. Sure the rider has negotiated that turn at 60mph for the past 5 years, well today there is a tree limb in the back of the corner that the rider did not see until it was to late. At a slower speed the rider could straighten the bike up and apply emergency braking to maneuver around the object or to lessen the impact.

There is no perfect school, as I said, I teach one of many skillsets. The skillset I teach is the slow speed skills that so many riders do not fill is an important skillset. I can tell you with todays larger and more powerful motorcycles this is a very important skillset. The average rider that comes through my class is 60 years old, has the positive income to buy that dream bike HD/BMW/Goldwing/..... and find out that that dream bike is uncomfortable and unstable at slow speeds and the rider is nervous to ride. I see hundreds on these bike motorcycles for sale every year with just a few thousand miles on them.

I love this discussion and hope others will join in. I will be the first to tell you I do not have all the answers and will be happy to learn from others that do. I have watched the videos that @Donna posted and envy her speed skills and hope to be at that level someday.

Erick
 

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K1600GA
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I am going through the same challenges building a practice up here in New England. Long story, but what I want to build is a practice that takes riders from the ARC to the track with street skills. riderightmotorcycletraining.com

But.. in order to do what I really want I have to align myself with a basic school for the MSF credentials (a requirement for licensing) - even though I will not be a certifying school.

The plan now is to teach with either a Harley dealer (who does both the BRC and ProRider courses) or an independent school in MA. All instructors in NH or ME must be MSF Rider Coaches.

I take the slow-speed skills training every year and practice regularly (when there isn't ice on the ground).
 

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Thanks for the offer Erick. I started a conversation.
 
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