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KBiK
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Discussion Starter #1
I watched the final race of the 2019 MotoGP in Valencia today. The first 14 laps was run in very heavy rain and almost half the field went down. Almost all of these crashes were cause with the rear slipping and resulted in a high side crash. This type of very dangerous crash is rare in MotoGP. Low side crashes caused by the front losing grip are much more common.

What I was interested in is that the riders held onto the bars as they were flipped off the bike twisting their bodies over so they landed on their backs and allowing the bikes to tumble away from them. It was great to see all the riders walk away from these major crashes with only Marquez having an obviously dislocated shoulder, a repeat of an injury he sustained in practice.

So is this technique of holding onto the bars in a high side crash a good solution to reducing the risk of major injury? Is it a technique taught in race school?
 
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Outta This World
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I think the 'hanging on' happens way more often in the wet when the flipping action/speed is much less violent.
 

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technique or not, they all travel in the same direction with no kerbs, most of the injury prevention is location
 
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From all the MotoGP I've watched, some riders absorb the bump with their legs and cling on for dear life... others get launched
Bear in mind they are experienced crashers with reflexes that mortals couldn't dream of.

The one and only highside I've had was a blur. The tail kicked out then all of a sudden the horizon started rotating.
 

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KBiK
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Discussion Starter #5
technique or not, they all travel in the same direction with no kerbs, most of the injury prevention is location
I agree the courses are very well designed to ensure the riders and bikes can slide safely without hitting any hard kerbs or fences. In regular road conditions if you low or high side into a tree it doesn't make any difference.

The course design however does not stop a rider being struck by a twisting bike after a high side crash that hurls the rider off in front of the bike. That is why I asked the question about the technique of holding onto the bars.

I also realize that all of these MotoGP riders have skills and reaction response times that are close to immortal.
 

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My answer: I have no idea. I guess I always assumed it was just their instinct to keep riding. Teaching my son how to ride the atv, I tell him (in his ear as I'm seating behind him), "When you get stressed, you have to keep driving, keep steering, keep thinking and reacting. You can't freeze up and hope something bad doesn't happen." My guess...they instinctively want to keep trying to correct and maintain. It's their habit. I'd be interested if they do teach some sort of hold-on-during-the-ejection technique. Sometimes it's reflexes that saves them from injury, sometimes it's luck. Its a good question.
 
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