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Discussion Starter #1
After waiting almost 10 weeks for BMW to build and ship a new engine for my GTL, it arrived at the dealer about noon PST. They're hoping to have the engine installed by EOB today. On the surface, that seems really quick, but the old engine is out and they've been ready to jump on it for a while now.

I feel like a kid on Christmas. I originally dropped the bike off in March for excessive oil consumption diagnosis, and haven't seen it since. It's going to be fun breaking the new engine in, totally under my control. I bought the bike used with 1100 miles, and I have a feeling the first owner didn't do the right kind of break-in riding during his short ownership. It's all on me now. :)

If all goes well, I'll be doing a sunset ride later today down PCH through Malibu, and then a loop over mountain roads back home. Worst case, this will all happen tomorrow.
 

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Wow, bet you can't wait to get in the saddle. In the long run you're lots better off, you get to break it in your way. I was feeling sorry for your 10 week wait, until I read where you get to ride, lol. Enjoy!
 

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I feel like a kid on Christmas. I originally dropped the bike off in March for excessive oil consumption diagnosis, and haven't seen it since. It's going to be fun breaking the new engine in, totally under my control. I bought the bike used with 1100 miles, and I have a feeling the first owner didn't do the right kind of break-in riding during his short ownership. It's all on me now. :)

If all goes well, I'll be doing a sunset ride later today down PCH through Malibu, and then a loop over mountain roads back home. Worst case, this will all happen tomorrow.
In the long run, this is all for the best. The first owner almost had to have done something really bad during break-in, else how the damage now that the K16's engine issues have been sorted, and else why the trade-in on a touring bike after that few miles? Now, you get a basically new bike, and you get to ride PCH/Malibu all the time, you lucky bastige, you! Enjoy!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
In the long run, this is all for the best. The first owner almost had to have done something really bad during break-in, else how the damage now that the K16's engine issues have been sorted, and else why the trade-in on a touring bike after that few miles? Now, you get a basically new bike, and you get to ride PCH/Malibu all the time, you lucky bastige, you! Enjoy!
Thanks. The prior owner was an older guy (somewhere in his 70s) who had mostly rode 2-up with his wife. He quickly found out that a GTL is not an RT (his other long time bike), and decided the GTL was too much bike for him. That suggests to me he didn’t initially ride the bike the way it should have. I’ll never know for sure. I can just go forward.

It is a blessing having PCH/Malibu, and the surrounding mountains, in your backyard. At the same time, there is a uniqueness to roads/terrain wherever you live. That’s the beauty of owning a bike like the K16, riding distances, and experiencing everything you can. I’m looking forward to getting back in the saddle.
 

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Fantastic news and before much longer you will be out enjoying your bike as you should have done so long ago. Good things always come to those who wait and are good people.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
got the approval from BMW about 3 weeks ago. At that time it showed the motor was available in Germany and would be shipped by air to the dealer
Mine arrived exactly 2 weeks after being shipped from Germany. It sounds like you should see yours shortly.(y)
 

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Great news. Having waited nigh on 8 months for a similar engine change, though to be fair this was affected by the Gearbox recall and Covid. My first engine, I bought the bike new, was run in meticulously as per the owners manual, but again to be fair to that procedure, it used a lot of oil from the get go.

Iv'e now put 1500kms on the new engine and so far it hasn't used a drop (fingers crossed etc). Why some engines use oil whilst others do not is a mystery (to me). My dealer tells me they couldn't find anything wrong with the old oil burner for what thats worth. Clearly something was amiss. 1 litre/1,000kms tells its own story?

Anyway I'm off on a ride today, mostly Freeway (needs must) but as always, I'll revel in the magic K's donk and the comfort of my RDL. Safe travels and best regards.....
 

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It's too easy to blame the first owner IMHO & frankly, with modern engines/oil, it seems highly unlikely that would be the case.

It would be interesting to learn the actual cause of the high oil consumption, but that would mean tearing down the old motor meticulously - my concern here is these motors finding their way back into the food chain. As I understand it, some get skipped, which is where my concern arises, whilst a select few are returned to Berlin for analysis.
 

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It's too easy to blame the first owner IMHO & frankly, with modern engines/oil, it seems highly unlikely that would be the case.
I agree, my first K16 was a 2012 model. It was an ex demo bike with 1,000 miles on it and it was immaculate. When I got overheating issues with it, I blamed the dealer, back then I had never experienced overheating issues on any bike I had ever owned, so someone had to be at fault.

Experience taught me how wrong I was.
 

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congrats, on the new engine.
break it in right, don't over rev it or lug it.
but by all means DONT BABY IT !
good luck ride safe.
Gary
 

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I had a 2008 Kawasaki KLR 650. The 2008 was a updated design. Kawasaki had a problem with many engines that year. Mine was one of them, it used 1 qt every 600 miles. I finally installed an oversized piston 685cc. Just boring and installing the new piston fixed the oil consumption. Speculation still abounds as to why this year and model was an oil burner, but based on my experience, it had something to do with either the piston tolerances or ring seating, since the new piston and rings fixed the problem.

I would not be surprised if there were a similar issue with some K1600's piston sizing or ring seating. Could be the rings weren't properly aligned. Could be the landings on the piston were not gapped properly. Could be the pistons were too small. Lot's of could be's. But, it would be interesting to see if an oil burner could be fixed by new pistons and rings. It would be REALLY interesting if oversized pistons were available for the K1600. Imagine a K1685? :)
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It's too easy to blame the first owner IMHO & frankly, with modern engines/oil, it seems highly unlikely that would be the case.

It would be interesting to learn the actual cause of the high oil consumption, but that would mean tearing down the old motor meticulously - my concern here is these motors finding their way back into the food chain. As I understand it, some get skipped, which is where my concern arises, whilst a select few are returned to Berlin for analysis.
Like I said previously, it's my personal speculation and I'll never know for sure. Many would question your statement to the effect that it makes little difference how the bike is initially ridden. The BMW Master Techs I've talked to would certainly disagree.

Still, it could very well be related to manufacturing. The dealer did methodically tear down the engine and had several back-and-forth discussions with BMW in the process. That was step #1 and took a full month before BMW gave the approval for a new engine. They didn't find a single smoking gun. Some of the cylinder walls showed unusual wear, and there were other areas of concern documented. None individually could account for the total oil consumption. At the end, they concluded it would cost more to replace individual components (with no guarantees) than to install a new engine.
 

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I had a 2008 Kawasaki KLR 650. The 2008 was a updated design. Kawasaki had a problem with many engines that year. Mine was one of them, it used 1 qt every 600 miles. I finally installed an oversized piston 685cc. Just boring and installing the new piston fixed the oil consumption. Speculation still abounds as to why this year and model was an oil burner, but based on my experience, it had something to do with either the piston tolerances or ring seating, since the new piston and rings fixed the problem.

I would not be surprised if there were a similar issue with some K1600's piston sizing or ring seating. Could be the rings weren't properly aligned. Could be the landings on the piston were not gapped properly. Could be the pistons were too small. Lot's of could be's. But, it would be interesting to see if an oil burner could be fixed by new pistons and rings. It would be REALLY interesting if oversized pistons were available for the K1600. Imagine a K1685? :)
I always think of these things as ‘sometimes *&it happens’.

For instance, I bought a used ‘08 KLR 650 with around 1000 miles on it. It looked like it had never been driven...pristine. I put front springs, windshield, tires, and a new seat on it after purchase. It now has about 10,000 miles on it, uses zero oil, and starts first try. If &*it hit the fan, this would be the bike I grabbed out of the garage.

Interestingly enough, I‘ve met other KLR owners while riding out in the middle of nowhere, and when we chatted, I’d inevitably ask (because they were on pre ‘08 KLR’s) did you have your doohickey replaced? Most say, what’s that?

Just saying, that just because a few bikes have problems in any given model, it doesn’t mean it’ll happen to you.
 

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Like I said previously, it's my personal speculation and I'll never know for sure. Many would question your statement to the effect that it makes little difference how the bike is initially ridden. The BMW Master Techs I've talked to would certainly disagree.

Still, it could very well be related to manufacturing. The dealer did methodically tear down the engine and had several back-and-forth discussions with BMW in the process. That was step #1 and took a full month before BMW gave the approval for a new engine. They didn't find a single smoking gun. Some of the cylinder walls showed unusual wear, and there were other areas of concern documented. None individually could account for the total oil consumption. At the end, they concluded it would cost more to replace individual components (with no guarantees) than to install a new engine.

Of course BMW techs would disagree. They are paid/briefed to admit nothing. It was the same when my gearbox failed at 4k miles. GOK what caused it, the warranty made good, but I went without the bike for months & the old cassette had been magicked away before I could take a look.

The cylinder bores should show no wear at these mileages - IIRC they are nikasil plated in an alloy block, so the only reason for a problem has to be a manufacturing fault, loss of lubrication or overheating. Each option usually throws up witness, either in the nature of the bore damage, oil analysis or coolant loss. The race teams, operating with sealed engines, have got this perfected - it's not rocket science.

Here, whilst I concur with the solution, the analysis remains subtly opaque don't you think.
 
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