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Coyotek: "These TPMs have a mandated accuracy. They are more accurate than most riders Wmart tire gauge. One of my past posts was of the EU standard. It's pretty tight, 2psi IIRC..."


Keith, I start off using a Milton inflator (that looks and feel like a nice piece of gear and claims +/- .05% accuracy). Then, from time to time, I double-check it with an Accutire (recommended by MCN) and finally a stick/pencil gauge for grins (that's about the best I can do from my layman's garage). Generally, with a good crisp seal, these three will be within a pound of each other at my 42 psi target, but when I check the TPM I find it is usually a good 2-3 lbs lighter than the average of the other three systems. I don't know what to make of it except maybe it's out of spec/calibration, in need of -- ouch! -- replacement.

For riding purposes, as a routine, I rely on the Milton inflator the first morning of a ride, then use the Accutire each morning thereafter. And as for the TPM, I check it straight away to get a baseline value and use that to alert me to any material changes that might take place during the day's ride.

Checkin tire pressure...grrrr...GD rotors!: :cool:

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Coyotek: "These TPMs have a mandated accuracy. They are more accurate than most riders Wmart tire gauge. One of my past posts was of the EU standard. It's pretty tight, 2psi IIRC..."


Keith, I start off using a Milton inflator (that looks and feel like a nice piece of gear and claims +/- .05% accuracy). Then, from time to time, I double-check it with an Accutire (recommended by MCN) and finally a stick/pencil gauge for grins (that's about the best I can do from my layman's garage). Generally, with a good crisp seal, these three will be within a pound of each other at my 42 psi target, but when I check the TPM I find it is usually a good 2-3 lbs lighter than the average of the other three systems. I don't know what to make of it except maybe it's out of spec/calibration, in need of -- ouch! -- replacement.

For riding purposes, as a routine, I rely on the Milton inflator the first morning of a ride, then use the Accutire each morning thereafter. And as for the TPM, I check it straight away to get a baseline value and use that to alert me to any material changes that might take place during the day's ride.

Checkin tire pressure...grrrr...GD rotors!: :cool:

View attachment 167712
I've posted this before. Any angle, anytime. No struggles.


 

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Glad I was out riding all day today, this topic has been really busy. I think the TPMS' work well, whenever my tyre pressure has been low the bike has told me and are spot on. So I don't use a tyre pressure guage ever. I have compressed air in my garage and a an inflator. They're all much of a much in terms of PSI.
 

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Before I went for a ride this morning, I added a little air front and rear to bring the pressures to 43. Seems I read here that the TPMS is set for a cold ambient air temp of 68. It was already 73 when I went to the garage. 43 seemed reasonable given the air temp. Once underway, I checked the TPMS results on the dash. 42 front, 41 rear. I expected the readout to be the same front and rear since the gauge pressures were.
 
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Oh, I got that, all right! Love it. Pack one with me. Been known to remove the gas station air chuck (when necessary) and thread this one on instead. Works great. (y)
 

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2020 K1600 GT
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From the 2020 GT Manual
BMW seems to have put a decent amount of Tech into the TPMS. I am impressed. From the 2020 Manual.

"A sensor integrated into each tyre measures the air tempera- ture and the air pressure inside the tyre and transmits this in- formation to the control unit. Each sensor has a tripswitch that does not enable transmis- sion of the measured values until the motorcycle has accel- erated to about 30 km/h. The display shows "" for each tyre until the tyre-pressure sig- nal is received for the first time. The sensors continue to trans- mit the measured-value signals for approximately 15 minutes after the motorcycle comes to a stop.
An error message is issued if wheels without sensors are fit- ted to a motorcycle equipped with an RDC control unit.
Temperature compensation
Tyre pressure is a tempera- ture-sensitive variable: pres- sure increases as tyre tempe- rature rises and decreases as tyre temperature drops. Tyre temperature depends on ambi- ent temperature, on the style of riding and the duration of the ride.
The tyre-pressure readings shown by the multifunction display are temperature-com-
pensated; the reference tyre temperature for these readings is always 20 °C. The gauges on service station air lines do not compensate for temperature.
The tyre pressure recorded de- pends on tyre temperature. In most instances, therefore, these gauge readings will not tally with the pressures shown by the multifunction display. The warmer the tyres, the more the tester value exceeds the display value.
Pressure adaptation"
 

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I noticed the manufacturer suggest over 40psi...I can only assume that would be for a fully loaded down rig...what pressures are you running?....seems like over 40 is gonna prematurely wear out the tires..thx!
I’m running Perelli Angel 2 GT and I keep them around 46. I have 17K on these tires.
I had a tire rep from another company tell me to run 48 in my Avons… The side wall said 42.
That’s just my experience. I’m getting ready to get some more Perelli‘s and I’m going to get the “A” series this time; hopefully I’ll get the same kind of mileage.
….Like the man said, this is what I do; you do you!
Ed
 

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I certainly understand what the manufacturer recommends...I also know they're in the business of selling tires...I was actually hoping for real world experience with lower pressures and tire wear..thanks for all your input
My real world experience is that it doesn't really make a difference, and it's near impossible to maintain an exact PSI. I doubt the tire manufacturer specifies a lower PSI to increase tire wear and thus more tire sales. What matters to me is not to be overinflated. On the K1600, with its suspension, exact tire pressure is lint-picking anyway as the bike compensates nicely. Now on the racing models of each bike manufacturer and challenging conditions on the race track, it matters, but lolly gagging down Main St, it doesn't. We have roads in the US you could ride safely on wooden cart wheels.
 
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