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Hey AZ Jim,
Thanks for the nice comments. Yep, been doing it like that for eons. We used to haul our '08 Honda GL 1800 Goldwing on the back of our motorhome on a Hydralift. You had to be redundant on that. So, it's carried over to our present situation with the truck as you see. That's expensive equipment, the K bike that is. So, I want it in as perfect of condition AFTER a trip in the bed of the truck, as it was BEFORE it was loaded. So, ya gotta do what ya gotta do to protect the investment.
Scott
 

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It's your choice on that one. I use both. But, for the most part, since we tow our '11 GMC Sierra 1500 Extended Cab 4x4 behind our motorhome, we often load what's called a Rampage lift into the bed of that truck. Then, I prep the lift, roll the bike up to it, tie two tie downs to it in the fashion I explained above, and then, push a button and the K bike is simply pulled up into the back of the truck, all by itself, with a winch. When it's up there and stable, I add 4 more tie downs in strategic spots. I made my own soft ties with TWO loops on the front.
Scott
That rampage lift is pretty cool but pricey at 3500 bucks. Just curious how much the lift weighs and if it's easy or difficult to install/remove it from the bed of the truck. I bought a Aluma motorcycle trailer a year ago but might have opted for a rampage lift if I knew they existed.
 

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That rampage lift is pretty cool but pricey at 3500 bucks. Just curious how much the lift weighs and if it's easy or difficult to install/remove it from the bed of the truck. I bought a Aluma motorcycle trailer a year ago but might have opted for a rampage lift if I knew they existed.
Hey Wellcraft,
Well, that lift hovers in the 275 lbs. range, plus or minus some. I've not weighed it nor have I contacted the company on it's specs. I've been messing with metal my whole life and this is a somewhat educated guess. Now, as for the difficulty/ease at which the Rampage is mounted/removed from the truck, well, I took care of that a long, long time ago. We like our truck to be open and free to use as a truck at our pleasure. So, that meant we don't want anything permanent stuck in the back of it.

I fabricated a cart for it when I bought the Rampage. The cart is designed and built, to carry the Rampage and roll around wherever I want to put it. And, it's designed to hold that Rampage at exactly 1" above the bed level. That means, when we need to mount the Rampage into the bed of the truck, I simply back the truck into position for receiving the Rampage and park it. Then, I get out and remove the tail gate. Since the bed of the truck is a 6.5' bed, the Rampage overhangs the end of the bed by around maybe 18-20" or so. Since that means the tail gate is useless anyways because it would be under the Rampage. So, off it comes and get's stored when the Rampage is in the truck.

Then, once the gate is off, I line up the Rampage to the center of the bed and since the Rampage is one inch higher than the bed level, I simply roll the cart and Rampage towards the cab of the truck. The Rampage is now approximately 1/3 to 1/2 into the truck but is not touching the bed. I then lift the opposite end up slightly and that makes the other end touch the bed. It also allows for the Wife to simply roll the cart out of the way. When that's done, I simply glide the Rampage the rest of the way into the bed, to a pre-determined stopping point. I mounted a piece of angle iron under the bed, about 12" away from the front of the bed. On that angle iron is two 1/2" nuts, welded to it.

When the Rampage is in alignment with those nuts, I drop two, 1/2" x 3.5" bolts through the Rampage and screw them into the receiving nuts, on that angle iron. That part is done. Then, there's three more mounting bolts in the other end of the Rampage. Those take approximately 1-2 minutes to install and tighten. DONE! The Rampage is mounted. I have an Anderson 50A plug tucked away in the corner of the bed that, when the Rampage is in the bed, I simply grab that plug and plug it into the Rampage winch. The Rampage is now ready to receive whatever bike I want to carry.

If you look up Rampage lifts on Youtube, you'll see just how a motorcycle is prepped and lifted into the bed of a truck. It's actually quite simple and yet, phenomenally strong and stable. It's just like a Roll-back wrecker that picks up cars at an accident. I hope this long and boring explanation has helped. Oh, by the way, yeah, the Rampage might be a bit on the expensive side when new but, I purchased mine used for $1,500 and it had been used TWICE. I just saw one for sale for $1,100 in San Diego Craigs list about a month ago. THAT is/was a steal!!!
Scott
 

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Hey Wellcraft,
Well, that lift hovers in the 275 lbs. range, plus or minus some. I've not weighed it nor have I contacted the company on it's specs. I've been messing with metal my whole life and this is a somewhat educated guess. Now, as for the difficulty/ease at which the Rampage is mounted/removed from the truck, well, I took care of that a long, long time ago. We like our truck to be open and free to use as a truck at our pleasure. So, that meant we don't want anything permanent stuck in the back of it.

I fabricated a cart for it when I bought the Rampage. The cart is designed and built, to carry the Rampage and roll around wherever I want to put it. And, it's designed to hold that Rampage at exactly 1" above the bed level. That means, when we need to mount the Rampage into the bed of the truck, I simply back the truck into position for receiving the Rampage and park it. Then, I get out and remove the tail gate. Since the bed of the truck is a 6.5' bed, the Rampage overhangs the end of the bed by around maybe 18-20" or so. Since that means the tail gate is useless anyways because it would be under the Rampage. So, off it comes and get's stored when the Rampage is in the truck.

Then, once the gate is off, I line up the Rampage to the center of the bed and since the Rampage is one inch higher than the bed level, I simply roll the cart and Rampage towards the cab of the truck. The Rampage is now approximately 1/3 to 1/2 into the truck but is not touching the bed. I then lift the opposite end up slightly and that makes the other end touch the bed. It also allows for the Wife to simply roll the cart out of the way. When that's done, I simply glide the Rampage the rest of the way into the bed, to a pre-determined stopping point. I mounted a piece of angle iron under the bed, about 12" away from the front of the bed. On that angle iron is two 1/2" nuts, welded to it.

When the Rampage is in alignment with those nuts, I drop two, 1/2" x 3.5" bolts through the Rampage and screw them into the receiving nuts, on that angle iron. That part is done. Then, there's three more mounting bolts in the other end of the Rampage. Those take approximately 1-2 minutes to install and tighten. DONE! The Rampage is mounted. I have an Anderson 50A plug tucked away in the corner of the bed that, when the Rampage is in the bed, I simply grab that plug and plug it into the Rampage winch. The Rampage is now ready to receive whatever bike I want to carry.

If you look up Rampage lifts on Youtube, you'll see just how a motorcycle is prepped and lifted into the bed of a truck. It's actually quite simple and yet, phenomenally strong and stable. It's just like a Roll-back wrecker that picks up cars at an accident. I hope this long and boring explanation has helped. Oh, by the way, yeah, the Rampage might be a bit on the expensive side when new but, I purchased mine used for $1,500 and it had been used TWICE. I just saw one for sale for $1,100 in San Diego Craigs list about a month ago. THAT is/was a steal!!!
Scott
Thanks for the lengthy explanation I appreciate it and I did google rampage motorcycle lifts and checked out one of their videos. Much simpler and safer than me riding my bike up a ramp and into the bed of my truck.
 

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Wellcraft,
You're quite welcome. I don't like writing novels but, sometimes it's the details that gets a point across that would otherwise be fuzzy. Yeah, if I had to load just about ANY bike heavier than say, oh, maybe 300 lbs into my truck with the use of a ramp, nope, ain't happening. I have three bikes. My K1600 GTL-E, a 2018 Honda Africa Twin Adventure Sports DCT, and a 2007 Yamaha TW200. I can load the TW into the back of the truck on a ramp 'cause it's close to 278 lbs. The A/T, nope, not even gonna think about a ramp. It's 540 lbs. I got ONE LIFE, and one life only. I'm not gonna screw up this old 68 year old body by fighting the weight and the potential broken bones from a bike that heavy falling on me.

So, to me, it was and still is, wellllll worth the cost and setup of a Rampage to load and unload, and carry my two heavier bikes. I'd do it again in a heartbeat.

As far as procuring a Rampage, yep, ya gotta be ready to jump when they come available. I lived in San Diego when one became available in Las Vegas. I called on it, made the deal and, ROAD TRIP! That was over 8 years ago. That Rampage might be used very often but, if and when needed, it's invaluable.
Scott
 

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I picked up a set of these. Arrived yesterday, so I don't know how well they work. Seem to be well made. Going to test them out later this week.
 

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I just towed my (new to me) bagger from Tucson to El Paso. After fiddling with it for almost an hour (try that inside an enclosed car trailer in 101 deg heat), I ended up strapping it from the engine cards up front and the rear tire from the back. Worked out great. Even through bumps. I didn't want to strap anything anywhere close to where it would rub or come close to rubbing on any painted surface. The straps will eventually wear the paint off from the simplest of vibration so be weary of anything touching a fender/bag/etc.
 

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I was a C-130 Loadmaster in the Air Force. I've hauled and/or airdropped tanks, Humvees, the president's limo, and yes, motorcycles. I would tie down our K1600s just like the owner's manual says, providing that the front wheel is in a wheel chock or the wheel well on a U-Haul. I've hauled several bikes on a U-Haul bike trailer and it always worked well for me.

I use these straps: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01N7P7EOX/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_search_asin_title?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Never strap to the handlebars. Trailers bounce whether enclosed or not. If you leave room for some travel in your suspension as you should, the bouncing along the road will compress the springs. When said springs rebound your 800 pound bike upward, the handlebars will repeatedly bear the full brunt of dead-stopping the upward motion of your bike. The relatively small bolts and the handlebar mounting plate where the handlebars are attached are not designed for the kind of torque put on them by the stresses of that rebounding. Though they may not break immediately, the cumulative effect could cause them to fatigue and possibly break off at a later, most inconvenient time. 😲 All it takes is a hairline fracture.

Put another way, would you let a 200-pound man stand on your handlebars and jump up and down repeatedly for a time equal to the duration of your trip? I would assume not, but multiply that times 4 (800 pounds) and that's what you have when tying to the bars.

Ride Safe!
Stew
 

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I just towed my (new to me) bagger from Tucson to El Paso. After fiddling with it for almost an hour (try that inside an enclosed car trailer in 101 deg heat), I ended up strapping it from the engine cards up front and the rear tire from the back. Worked out great. Even through bumps. I didn't want to strap anything anywhere close to where it would rub or come close to rubbing on any painted surface. The straps will eventually wear the paint off from the simplest of vibration so be weary of anything touching a fender/bag/etc.
Use soft ties to prevent any wear to painted surfaces.
 

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+1 @StewB , FWIW, using the crash bars as tie down points is about the same as using the handlebars; e.g. you’re loading the front suspension. The front carrier is where you should attach your straps. Just be sure not to pinch brake lines.

Duane
 
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Actually I have e-trak in my trailer (for tying down car wheels) and the tie downs we’re pulling to the sides with minimal compression of the suspension. That along with tying the wheel with a sheepskin wrap tie down back kept the bike stable all the way home. I was leery of using the handlebars for fear of damaging the controls. I wasn’t aware the suspension was the issue. Good to know.
 
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