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That line is starting to sound like "This one time, at Band Camp...". :ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO::ROFLMAO:..... I think you've got something on that manager that he doesn't want made public..... Hope you get your bike soon.
The bike is there but the one guy that can do the job to my wishes is off with a broken leg so the fix has been put back and I am hoping he gets a clearance from his specialist by Monday so he can return to work to do my bike. I did say to the dealership yesterday if Simon my mechanic I prefer to do the job is not back on board then get the next best guy to do the job. But I do want it by the start of next month registered and in my hands. They agreed and sure they want it out of the place.
 

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When the salesmen wasn't looking I stripped down to my assless chaps and just sat on it for a while pretending I was riding!!!! ;)

It looked really sharp and I was disappointed they wouldn't sell it to me. After looking at a few I decided to go with a Black on instead but the Blue is beautiful too. It was a tough decision.
All chaps are assless, just saying!! Carry on!
 

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Dropped my bike off for the recall today. I mentioned that several times the starter has failed to engage the gear and turn the engine over after the bike has been sitting for a couple weeks. You can hear the starter motor spinning, but it doesn't turn the engine over. A second attempt will spin the engine. The tech said that this problem might be related to the recall.

I also mentioned that at times when using the reverse function, it's a lot louder than normal and sounds like a bad bearing spinning. The tech said that this problem would be corrected by the recall.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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I stopped by the dealer today and they said parts are ordered and should be about 2 weeks before she goes in for surgery. Not thrilled about the new scoot having the trans R&R but what is one to do. Just get over it and go ridding I suppose. I am looking forward to this thorn in the side being behind us all...
 

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I went to the dealer today to see what the progress for on the recall. I took my bike in 2 Saturdays ago and they said it would take 5 hours or so. The called a few days later and said they needed to order a tool they didn't have. When I went back in the shop the transmission was out of the bike and it was apart on a table. At that point I was thinking this has to stop. There is little chance this bike gets back together and works right. I need to cut my losses and move on. At the moment I saw it apart on the table and I thought I never want to ride this bike again. I didn't trust it before and I will never trust it now.

Anyway it's no secret I have not liked the K1600 almost from the first day of ownership. Great brakes and ok power were just not enough to over come the odd top heavy in-stability at low speeds, difficult to resolve ergos, slow throttle, left pull, radio, MIA reverse gear, paint popping off, and now the transmission issues. I don't know what went wrong with this bike. The power has no equal in this class but if you are an engine guy this engine is no sexy siren. I just scratch my head on where those 160 horses go between the crank and the rear wheel. The build quality is amazing, yet the paint pops off on a 6K miles, garage kept bike that hasn't even ever been ridden in the rain?

Then there is the stunning drop in value. Anyway I was planning to do a review of the bike called "2018 K1600 GT - 1-Year Review". It was going to end with the bike getting crushed at the scrap yard. I actually got a guy at work who was going to video the review and I contacted the scrap yard too. Anyway I came to my senses and decided to just admit defeat and take it like a man. Besides loosing half my money was better than loosing all of it, no matter how good the latter felt.

So I traded it in on a 1250 GS today. I felt a bit stupid writing a check to BMW again after the K16 nightmare, but there simply isn't much in this class unless you can find a KTM dealer somewhere on the map!
 

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Talked to my dealer late this afternoon. The service manager said that they have completed 4 repairs with another currently in being repaired. I asked when they could get mine in and now have an appointment for next Friday. They said it would be a few days before it would be done so we will see. I will keep everyone up dated with the progress.
 

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I went to the dealer today to see what the progress for on the recall. I took my bike in 2 Saturdays ago and they said it would take 5 hours or so. The called a few days later and said they needed to order a tool they didn't have. When I went back in the shop the transmission was out of the bike and it was apart on a table. At that point I was thinking this has to stop. There is little chance this bike gets back together and works right. I need to cut my losses and move on. At the moment I saw it apart on the table and I thought I never want to ride this bike again. I didn't trust it before and I will never trust it now.

Anyway it's no secret I have not liked the K1600 almost from the first day of ownership. Great brakes and ok power were just not enough to over come the odd top heavy in-stability at low speeds, difficult to resolve ergos, slow throttle, left pull, radio, MIA reverse gear, paint popping off, and now the transmission issues. I don't know what went wrong with this bike. The power has no equal in this class but if you are an engine guy this engine is no sexy siren. I just scratch my head on where those 160 horses go between the crank and the rear wheel. The build quality is amazing, yet the paint pops off on a 6K miles, garage kept bike that hasn't even ever been ridden in the rain?

Then there is the stunning drop in value. Anyway I was planning to do a review of the bike called "2018 K1600 GT - 1-Year Review". It was going to end with the bike getting crushed at the scrap yard. I actually got a guy at work who was going to video the review and I contacted the scrap yard too. Anyway I came to my senses and decided to just admit defeat and take it like a man. Besides loosing half my money was better than loosing all of it, no matter how good the latter felt.

So I traded it in on a 1250 GS today. I felt a bit stupid writing a check to BMW again after the K16 nightmare, but there simply isn't much in this class unless you can find a KTM dealer somewhere on the map!

I think when you see your bike in bits on a workbench, for some if us, it just drives a nail through the heart of Ownership. When you’ve owned your bike for years and enjoy fettling/tinkering/repairing/replacing, it’s an odd joyful thing ......however when your bike isn’t even out of warranty, then seeing it in surgery takes away the control of ownership ......it’s like being a passenger when you want to be driving.

I’ve had more than my fair share of GTL issues since taking delivery in Summer 2017 of a shiny/new Ebony, now we arrive in Spring 2020 and I take delivery of a shiny/new GTL, another Warranty Replacement. This will be my last attempt at K Ownership, if it doesn’t work out and I have same quality issues then it’s Goodbye.

When I ride away from the dealership on my New K, it’s such a good feeling, all the great points wash thru’ you and you radiate the glow of happy ownership. Likewise, when you head off on trips and you saddle up and set off, as the miles roll by, rolling on/off the throttle, slowly banking into turns, taking in the scenery ......it’s all good, it’s the New Girlfriend, the Just Married feeling ......then, in my case, no mechanical issues, just poor quality paintwork bubbling, rusting ......that just begins to rub your relationship the wrong way because a New Bike at £23,000 UK£ or just short of 30,000US$ just shouldn’t have these basic issues.

The recall? ......disappointing however, these things happen and my advice is DO NOT go to the dealer to see your bike in surgery, just like not watching a human operation before you go in for one! ?

So....I say this to/about BMW ......We get your German efficiency which is great, in the sense of actioning repairs albeit your communication is lacking in this instance. Motorcycle Owners are a peculiar breed by & large, we buy what is essentially a “luxury toy” however we engage with it in on a wholly different level from most other wheeled objects. When you break your favourite Christmas Gift Toy, and your Dad assures you he will mend it, fix it, make it better or, buy you a new one? ........that other “Luxury Toy”, our motorcycle? .......it usually costs many thousands and for most of us it’s a considerable financial purchase ......so, when something goes seriously wrong, you (BMW) need to engage helluva lot more because a pat-on-the-head, a few letters and a disjointed repair schedule doesn’t instil the confidence of “our Dad at Christmas”

Imagine if BMW had engaged in owners forums or posted You Tube Videos explaining/demonstrating etc - sure folk would have a go, however simply post something informative the way that you post your R18 PR Videos would have a much more positive outcome. Suppression of information, random response, keeping the problem watered down because it’s spread across different countries? ........it doesn’t work, because the very social media you use to Market/Advertise your Products at us, when it suits you .......that same medium is the one that we use when we are trying to figure out what the feck is going on with the “transmission recall”. Thank [email protected] for the Good BMW Dealers who do their best to make up for their Manufacturers shortcomings.

Those that are reading this and thinking “Feck-off” ScotsWhaeHae, fair enough ......however you must surely appreciate this .......BMW don’t love nor understand Motorcyclists, it’s just a business. If they really understood what makes us tick, imagine how much better we would feel as BMW Owners, when problems like the “transmission recall” arise. It’s not difficult for BMW to manage recalls much, much better.
 

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I ran a Harley repair shop for some years and brand new bikes torn apart to the smallest pieces for customization and performance mods were daily bread. In the hands of qualified people you get good results. It all boils down to people.
 

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Seeing the bike taken apart was not the problem for me. Seeing the extent of the fix I realized that BMW should of had the dealers remove the transmissions and return them to BMW for proper re-manufacture and verification. They then would have sent back a fixed, assembled transmission to the dealers to install. The variables are too many letting mechanics inexperienced in this fix do it under varying conditions. I'm not saying the fix won't work, it just seems to my untrained eyes that it wasn't done with maximum owner benefit in mind. Anyway BMW knows what they are doing and why they are doing it, so let's hope the poor K16 owner has been figured in there somewhere.

Now that my relationship is over, I'm getting more reflective:

First your appreciation of the K depends on how you approach the bike. If you were dealing with HD and other heavy, low tech touring bikes and cruisers and K16 is a positive revelation. The K simply does things bikes that size can't do and does it with a level of sophistication not ever seen in the class. But if you come from sporty bikes, it's just a little hard to get what all the fuss is about. To a HD rider the K is frisky, to a sport touring bike the K is top heavy. So a lot of it is perspective.

BMW's are an engine, specifically a boxer engine. This engine has certain advantages physically in terms of mass centralization and powerband. Aside form the impressive S1000RR's inline 4, BMW is focused on the boxer and specifically the GS/GSA line. The K16 engine is a car engine adapted to a bike and in many ways it's fighting physics. The weight is too high, heat is a problem, etc. When the K16 first hit the streets it was so far ahead of anyone else, it was amazing. You could argue it's still considerably ahead of the class but those basic physical issues of packing 6 cylinders perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the bike are there.

The K is a very complicated motorcycle. I think that over the years, BMW has gone to patch work engineering to stay ahead of emissions challenges, less reliable out sourcing to manage costs, and poorly conceived new features. So the current bike is actually less than the original. On top of that the 6 cylinder engine is a bit of a dead end format. It presents packaging issues, and filling 6 cylinders is inherently less efficient than filling 2, or 4. The Honda CBX had the same issues - a lot of weight and packaging issues for almost no real performance advantage. Personally, I think the R18 maybe the next Grand Touring platform for BMW (R1800 RT?), provided the engine proves to be workable (heat and reciprocating mass).

The final thing is I realized I'm not a long distance rider. I bought the K to do more distance, then realized I don't really want to spend a week on a bike and my riding buddies don't either. I'm just not at a point in my life where I can spend a week+ away from work sitting on a bike. My wife doesn't ride at all and I work like a crazy man. My riding is limited usually to Saturday hooliganism basically. I occasionally take a 3-4 day bike trip, but that's 2-3 a summer. So the K was probably always the wrong bike for me - which is not the bike or BMW's fault. So, I suppose you have to take my opinions of the bike with a grain of salt since it's generally not the proper tool for my riding in the first place.

So what will I miss about the K16? I think the heated seat and the wind protection for sure. No doubt the K16 cockpit was a comfortable place to be. Owning the BMW flagship was cool but I'm not a status guy really. It was also cool when people asked me what kind of bike I ride and I would say a Hayabusa and their nose would turn up. Then I would tell them I have a BMW too. Guess it proved I own a Busa because I love it, not because I don't know any better. Lol! But beyond that I don't think I'll miss much. However I'll still be on a BMW I suppose.
 

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Seeing the bike taken apart was not the problem for me. Seeing the extent of the fix I realized that BMW should of had the dealers remove the transmissions and return them to BMW for proper re-manufacture and verification. They then would have sent back a fixed, assembled transmission to the dealers to install. The variables are too many letting mechanics inexperienced in this fix do it under varying conditions. I'm not saying the fix won't work, it just seems to my untrained eyes that it wasn't done with maximum owner benefit in mind. Anyway BMW knows what they are doing and why they are doing it, so let's hope the poor K16 owner has been figured in there somewhere.

Now that my relationship is over, I'm getting more reflective:

First your appreciation of the K depends on how you approach the bike. If you were dealing with HD and other heavy, low tech touring bikes and cruisers and K16 is a positive revelation. The K simply does things bikes that size can't do and does it with a level of sophistication not ever seen in the class. But if you come from sporty bikes, it's just a little hard to get what all the fuss is about. To a HD rider the K is frisky, to a sport touring bike the K is top heavy. So a lot of it is perspective.

BMW's are an engine, specifically a boxer engine. This engine has certain advantages physically in terms of mass centralization and powerband. Aside form the impressive S1000RR's inline 4, BMW is focused on the boxer and specifically the GS/GSA line. The K16 engine is a car engine adapted to a bike and in many ways it's fighting physics. The weight is too high, heat is a problem, etc. When the K16 first hit the streets it was so far ahead of anyone else, it was amazing. You could argue it's still considerably ahead of the class but those basic physical issues of packing 6 cylinders perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the bike are there.

The K is a very complicated motorcycle. I think that over the years, BMW has gone to patch work engineering to stay ahead of emissions challenges, less reliable out sourcing to manage costs, and poorly conceived new features. So the current bike is actually less than the original. On top of that the 6 cylinder engine is a bit of a dead end format. It presents packaging issues, and filling 6 cylinders is inherently less efficient than filling 2, or 4. The Honda CBX had the same issues - a lot of weight and packaging issues for almost no real performance advantage. Personally, I think the R18 maybe the next Grand Touring platform for BMW (R1800 RT?), provided the engine proves to be workable (heat and reciprocating mass).

The final thing is I realized I'm not a long distance rider. I bought the K to do more distance, then realized I don't really want to spend a week on a bike and my riding buddies don't either. I'm just not at a point in my life where I can spend a week+ away from work sitting on a bike. My wife doesn't ride at all and I work like a crazy man. My riding is limited usually to Saturday hooliganism basically. I occasionally take a 3-4 day bike trip, but that's 2-3 a summer. So the K was probably always the wrong bike for me - which is not the bike or BMW's fault. So, I suppose you have to take my opinions of the bike with a grain of salt since it's generally not the proper tool for my riding in the first place.

So what will I miss about the K16? I think the heated seat and the wind protection for sure. No doubt the K16 cockpit was a comfortable place to be. Owning the BMW flagship was cool but I'm not a status guy really. It was also cool when people asked me what kind of bike I ride and I would say a Hayabusa and their nose would turn up. Then I would tell them I have a BMW too. Guess it proved I own a Busa because I love it, not because I don't know any better. Lol! But beyond that I don't think I'll miss much. However I'll still be on a BMW I suppose.
Fair viewpoint.

You’ll enjoy the 1250GS, it’s light, punchy enough and great forward vision.

I’ve always gone the GSA as I prefer heavier, bigger tank and slightly longer suspension travel.

It’s quite a trick that BMW pulled off, to have 2 closely associated Boxer Models that cover light or medium weight preference. No wonder it’s Beemers biggest selling model.

I loved my Sportsbikes however it was always the heavy ones I preferred over the shorter/lightweight models.

Thing is, if any of us don’t get on with a particular bike, just sell/trade it and move on. Ducati’s? not my thing, lovely to look at, especially when parked up at the side of the road waiting to get Emergency Fix ? ......although I understand the reliability improved when Audi arrived.

1250GS is certainly a noticeable move forward from the 1200 versus the 1150.
 

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I fully agree with your assessment in particular to the suggested approach to fixing the gearbox.
The inline six is a unique selling preposition and comes with some engineering compromises. For me coming from a longer history of ElectraGlides the K1600 was and is heaven and there is still no alternative. But there will be a day when I have to be realistic about my ability to control a 2 wheeler with a loaded weight up to 1200 lbs under any circumstances. With the inline 6 future being uncertain I am already looking into a R1250 RT...............
All the best with your new bike and don't be a stranger around here. I very much appreciate your thoughts
 

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I went to the dealer today to see what the progress for on the recall. I took my bike in 2 Saturdays ago and they said it would take 5 hours or so. The called a few days later and said they needed to order a tool they didn't have. When I went back in the shop the transmission was out of the bike and it was apart on a table. At that point I was thinking this has to stop. There is little chance this bike gets back together and works right. I need to cut my losses and move on. At the moment I saw it apart on the table and I thought I never want to ride this bike again. I didn't trust it before and I will never trust it now.

Anyway it's no secret I have not liked the K1600 almost from the first day of ownership. Great brakes and ok power were just not enough to over come the odd top heavy in-stability at low speeds, difficult to resolve ergos, slow throttle, left pull, radio, MIA reverse gear, paint popping off, and now the transmission issues. I don't know what went wrong with this bike. The power has no equal in this class but if you are an engine guy this engine is no sexy siren. I just scratch my head on where those 160 horses go between the crank and the rear wheel. The build quality is amazing, yet the paint pops off on a 6K miles, garage kept bike that hasn't even ever been ridden in the rain?

Then there is the stunning drop in value. Anyway I was planning to do a review of the bike called "2018 K1600 GT - 1-Year Review". It was going to end with the bike getting crushed at the scrap yard. I actually got a guy at work who was going to video the review and I contacted the scrap yard too. Anyway I came to my senses and decided to just admit defeat and take it like a man. Besides loosing half my money was better than loosing all of it, no matter how good the latter felt.

So I traded it in on a 1250 GS today. I felt a bit stupid writing a check to BMW again after the K16 nightmare, but there simply isn't much in this class unless you can find a KTM dealer somewhere on the map!
You have to tell me how is it going to the 1250 GS so far.... any regrets and such forth
 

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Seeing the bike taken apart was not the problem for me. Seeing the extent of the fix I realized that BMW should of had the dealers remove the transmissions and return them to BMW for proper re-manufacture and verification. They then would have sent back a fixed, assembled transmission to the dealers to install. The variables are too many letting mechanics inexperienced in this fix do it under varying conditions. I'm not saying the fix won't work, it just seems to my untrained eyes that it wasn't done with maximum owner benefit in mind. Anyway BMW knows what they are doing and why they are doing it, so let's hope the poor K16 owner has been figured in there somewhere.

Now that my relationship is over, I'm getting more reflective:

First your appreciation of the K depends on how you approach the bike. If you were dealing with HD and other heavy, low tech touring bikes and cruisers and K16 is a positive revelation. The K simply does things bikes that size can't do and does it with a level of sophistication not ever seen in the class. But if you come from sporty bikes, it's just a little hard to get what all the fuss is about. To a HD rider the K is frisky, to a sport touring bike the K is top heavy. So a lot of it is perspective.

BMW's are an engine, specifically a boxer engine. This engine has certain advantages physically in terms of mass centralization and powerband. Aside form the impressive S1000RR's inline 4, BMW is focused on the boxer and specifically the GS/GSA line. The K16 engine is a car engine adapted to a bike and in many ways it's fighting physics. The weight is too high, heat is a problem, etc. When the K16 first hit the streets it was so far ahead of anyone else, it was amazing. You could argue it's still considerably ahead of the class but those basic physical issues of packing 6 cylinders perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the bike are there.

The K is a very complicated motorcycle. I think that over the years, BMW has gone to patch work engineering to stay ahead of emissions challenges, less reliable out sourcing to manage costs, and poorly conceived new features. So the current bike is actually less than the original. On top of that the 6 cylinder engine is a bit of a dead end format. It presents packaging issues, and filling 6 cylinders is inherently less efficient than filling 2, or 4. The Honda CBX had the same issues - a lot of weight and packaging issues for almost no real performance advantage. Personally, I think the R18 maybe the next Grand Touring platform for BMW (R1800 RT?), provided the engine proves to be workable (heat and reciprocating mass).

The final thing is I realized I'm not a long distance rider. I bought the K to do more distance, then realized I don't really want to spend a week on a bike and my riding buddies don't either. I'm just not at a point in my life where I can spend a week+ away from work sitting on a bike. My wife doesn't ride at all and I work like a crazy man. My riding is limited usually to Saturday hooliganism basically. I occasionally take a 3-4 day bike trip, but that's 2-3 a summer. So the K was probably always the wrong bike for me - which is not the bike or BMW's fault. So, I suppose you have to take my opinions of the bike with a grain of salt since it's generally not the proper tool for my riding in the first place.

So what will I miss about the K16? I think the heated seat and the wind protection for sure. No doubt the K16 cockpit was a comfortable place to be. Owning the BMW flagship was cool but I'm not a status guy really. It was also cool when people asked me what kind of bike I ride and I would say a Hayabusa and their nose would turn up. Then I would tell them I have a BMW too. Guess it proved I own a Busa because I love it, not because I don't know any better. Lol! But beyond that I don't think I'll miss much. However I'll still be on a BMW I suppose.
I do agree with the variables are too many letting mechanics inexperienced in this fix do it under varying conditions. The fact that BMW has just been so laid back and expects the dealership to
A; Find the resources to do this job.
B: Give the dealership a Technical sheet and a video then expect the dealerships to do an excellent job with no such training from their side is B.S.
C: If BMW had any sense of doing the correct thing by its customer base and dealership network, they should put all the technicians from each dealership on a plan and take them to a workshop where they can train the technicians on the proper way to do this fix and in the 6 or so hours they expect the dealerships to do the job.
If the training happens it would be seen as a positive and give all of the owners such as us more confidence that BMW does give a **** about their business and training. I for one am not 100% happy that the dealership gets lumbered with this and is expected to cop it sweet, let alone the customer. I know my dealership was told that BMW Australia did not have the resources to do the recalls and that was why my bike was finally sent to them after 5.5 months, plus now it sits there because the one guy that has the most experience with BMW is off with an injury. In the end, I should know if he's back on board tomorrow but even if he is he's never done a pull-down and rebuild of a gearbox.

Lastly, a lot of this could have been handled so much better by having training courses all over the countries affected by this stop sale/recall and all the techs that were to do the jobs on our bikes would have the knowledge to do it with full confidence.
 

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Think the recall will fix the left pull and oil consumptions? Fingers crossed lol
 

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I do agree with the variables are too many letting mechanics inexperienced in this fix do it under varying conditions. The fact that BMW has just been so laid back and expects the dealership to
A; Find the resources to do this job.
B: Give the dealership a Technical sheet and a video then expect the dealerships to do an excellent job with no such training from their side is B.S.
C: If BMW had any sense of doing the correct thing by its customer base and dealership network, they should put all the technicians from each dealership on a plan and take them to a workshop where they can train the technicians on the proper way to do this fix and in the 6 or so hours they expect the dealerships to do the job.
If the training happens it would be seen as a positive and give all of the owners such as us more confidence that BMW does give a **** about their business and training. I for one am not 100% happy that the dealership gets lumbered with this and is expected to cop it sweet, let alone the customer. I know my dealership was told that BMW Australia did not have the resources to do the recalls and that was why my bike was finally sent to them after 5.5 months, plus now it sits there because the one guy that has the most experience with BMW is off with an injury. In the end, I should know if he's back on board tomorrow but even if he is he's never done a pull-down and rebuild of a gearbox.

Lastly, a lot of this could have been handled so much better by having training courses all over the countries affected by this stop sale/recall and all the techs that were to do the jobs on our bikes would have the knowledge to do it with full confidence.
Well all of this is why I just decided to cut my losses and move on. I do think the way BMW is going about this will work for the most part, but there are certainly going to be some horror stories coming out of this for a few owners. I just think BMW should have sent a few specialists and put a recall shop in strategic areas around the world and then had the transmissions sent there for the repair and then shipped back to the dealers to install. Maybe it would have been cheaper to just do it all in Germany, IDN. It seems just the cost of every dealer needing the toolsets would be worth that. There are dealers with 1 or 2 transmissions to fix ordering a set of those tools. I think most owners would be willing to be without the bike for 3-4 weeks to have the fix done by BMW.

Anyway BMW is a company full of really smart guys and girls. It's safe to assume that everything they are doing is calculated. I was LOL in the truck coming back from the dealer thinking some bean counter at BMW had figured they will sell 25% more GS/GSA's because of this recall! I got nothing from BMW on my GS. I was treated like any other sucker dragging in a POS trade nobody will buy. There was no acknowledgement of their role in my situation or seeing any value in my patronage of BMW. Feels like an experience I had with a former girlfriend!

A riding buddy reminded me of a conversation we had some time ago. Motorcyclists are family oriented people. The people you ride with are your brothers and sisters; you wave at passing riders you don't even know. Indeed many people ride specifically for the feeling of belonging. Manufacturers do this for the money. They only ride with us metaphorically. If you don't get this, you are eventually going to get your feelings hurt.
 
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