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Sir Robin’s Lead Minstrel
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1,472 Posts
The guy in the dealership was reading an email from the mothership.
Or so he said. I'm extremely cynical by professional training, as I'm paid to be near-paranoid and distrustful, I'll admit, but if my dealer told me the exact same thing, and claimed to be reading an email from BMW, my brain would be going, "Interesting. Maybe. Maybe not. It'll be fun to see if he was lying through his teeth, or telling the truth."

Now, a much more relevant context in my mind would be how the discussion came up. If you stopped in to discuss adding a S1000RR to your stable on top of your K1600, and the dealer just happened to mention it, for example, that would make me MUCH more likely to believe it was accurate, than if there was any chance I might be tempted to trade or buy another K1600, thus the, "better get one now, before it's too late," sales pitch.

And again, I'm NOT discounting the possibility that your dealer was telling the truth (and if they were, I'd expect to see confirmation here soon from other posters, upon inquiring from their own dealers). I'm just not yet taking it as gospel, either.

Obviously, we don't have all the relevant business facts to which the Mother Ship is privy, so it may make perfect sense if this is true. But just based on what we know, it sure seems like the way they've played this wasn't the wisest financial move, and I'd love to privately talk with one of their bean counters about cost/profit on the B/GA for only several years of production before killing the K1600 entirely.

Last, if I'm a dealer, and you're killing off the K1600 line, I want to know what your plans are to replace it in the lineup. I wouldn't expect a scoop on exactly what they're planning, but I would want to know if there will in fact be a replacement in the luxury-sport-touring segment, or if in 2021 when someone comes by my dealership and all my K1600s are sold, and they're cross-shopping the Goldwing, I just need to tell them to head on over to the Honda dealer.
 
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Sir Robin’s Lead Minstrel
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1,472 Posts
"I'm no longer a biker but a motorcyclist"
So very true.

I actually have to try not to overreact to being called a "biker," and give account for what the person meant, but the term is almost offensive to me, because it connotes and implies a certain "lifestyle" of which I'm not a part, nor with which I wish to be associated. I've never been a biker; I've always been a motorcyclist, meaning an enthusiast who wants to master his operation of the machine as best he can, so I at least always gently correct someone if they ever call me a "biker".
 

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dobervol
Ref the email, my first thought, "a sales pitch"...i have an ingrained distrust for salesmen/dealerships.
I played the biker game and got tired of the politics. I enjoy being a Lone Shark 🦈 now on my Bagger. The one thing , i noticed in that crowd, alot can't ride worth crap and don't know the ins and outs of their bike's. I can say these things with confidence cuz holding Road Captain position had to observe such qualities.
 

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218 Posts
The small changes from year to year mostly paint colours, some improvements to pro shift assist in the last few years and the Hill Hold control is way better than a few years back over all the bikes have not changed that much over the last 11 years since first being released other than the addition of the B and GA in the last few years. The one thing you will hate or love depending on your wants or needs is that the Garmin Sat. Nav. is a pain having to pay extra for it and not integrated, the other downfall is the shitty stereo /speaker system that is total crap. They are long overdue to have an upgrade to bring the bike and brand up top the higher grade of the Harley / Indian and Honda Infotainment systems. That can be over come with Sena/Packtalk coms. and using a mobile phone for navigation.
But than the Harley, Indian, and Honda are sub-standard in the power and handling department compared to the K bike.
 

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Upside Down
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1,491 Posts
Here is some info I found that may interest you.

From 1st January 2021 every new bike sold in the European Union is meant to comply with the next-generation ‘Euro 5’ emissions rules but it’s looking increasingly like manufacturers will struggle to bring their ranges into line with the new rules in time as the Coronavirus lockdownhamstrings both sales and development.
The impending Euro 5 rules aren’t coming as a surprise to anyone; they were pencilled out, along with their introduction timescale, nearly a decade ago and the European regulation laying out their implementation was put on the books in its final form in 2013. But despite plenty of warning, it’s increasingly apparent that a huge majority of modern bikes have yet to be approved to Euro 5 standards.
Some will sail through the tests with minimal modifications but many are likely to need extensive updates to meet the new rules, and under current plans it’s going to be tough to sell Euro 4 models after December 31st this year.
With the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic wreaking havoc on motorcycle manufacturing and development all over the world and inevitably having a serious impact on sales, there are growing calls from the bike industry to postpone the introduction of Euro 5 until 2022.

Growing calls for Euro 5 deadline to be postponed as coronavirus means stocks of Euro 4 models remain unsold


From 1st January 2021 every new bike sold in the European Union is meant to comply with the next-generation ‘Euro 5’ emissions rules but it’s looking increasingly like manufacturers will struggle to bring their ranges into line with the new rules in time as the Coronavirus lockdownhamstrings both sales and development.
The impending Euro 5 rules aren’t coming as a surprise to anyone; they were pencilled out, along with their introduction timescale, nearly a decade ago and the European regulation laying out their implementation was put on the books in its final form in 2013. But despite plenty of warning, it’s increasingly apparent that a huge majority of modern bikes have yet to be approved to Euro 5 standards.
Some will sail through the tests with minimal modifications but many are likely to need extensive updates to meet the new rules, and under current plans it’s going to be tough to sell Euro 4 models after December 31st this year.
With the COVID-19 Coronavirus pandemic wreaking havoc on motorcycle manufacturing and development all over the world and inevitably having a serious impact on sales, there are growing calls from the bike industry to postpone the introduction of Euro 5 until 2022.
How will Euro 5 affect existing bikes?
As with all Euro emissions laws, the rules are applied to new, unregistered bikes, so Euro 5 isn’t a concern for existing owners. However, the regulations could leave manufacturers with no option but to discontinue certain models if they’re unable to get them to comply with the new limits.
Although firms are already working hard to make their ranges compliant, inevitably the focus falls initially on the most popular and most profitable models. Niche bikes that sell in smaller numbers and make less of an impression on the firms’ bottom lines are likely to be the models that fall by the wayside when Euro 5 is enforced.

According to BMW’s official specs, the vast majority of its range is still Euro 4-approved, but it’s worth bearing in mind that several of its more recent bikes were developed with Euro 5 in mind even if they haven’t been certified to that standard just yet.
At the moment, the only models that are listed as Euro 5-spec are the F900XR and F900R.
The list of Euro 4-complient bikes that need to be Euro 5-certified includes:
  • R1250GS Adventure
  • R1250GS
  • F850GS Adventure
  • F850GS
  • F750GS
  • G310GS
  • R1250RS
  • S1000RR
  • K1600B
  • K1600 Grand America
  • K1600GT
  • K1600GTL
  • R1250RT
  • R1250R
  • S1000R
  • G310R
  • R nineT/Scrambler/Pure/UrbanG/S
  • C evolution
  • C650 Sport
  • C650GT
  • C400X
  • CX400GT

Of those, several were clearly made with Euro 5 in mind. The R1250 models, for instance, with their ShiftCam engines, are clearly created to be Euro 5 compliant, as is the S1000RR, even if they’re still listed as Euro 4 bikes.
There’s also the notable oddity of the C evolution in the list; it’s classed as ‘Euro 4’ but as a pure electric bike it’s clearly going to have no problem meeting tougher Euro 5 limits.
With the F900XR and F900R already meeting Euro 5, perhaps we should expect the F850 models to be updated to the F900’s 895cc engine in 2021.
 

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I got an 'update' yesterday from a reasonably reputable source. The 2021 model range just announced are those bikes already in production. They are fitting extras as standard to make them sell. There is still no plan to keep producing, but that may change.
 

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International Man of Mystery
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3,414 Posts
IMHO the K48 ist toast once BMW cannot bring Euro 4 bikes anymore into the market. Maybe they come back in 2022 with a reconfigured K48 along the lines of the 1250 but I doubt it. The segment is just too small.
 
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