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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
This cracks me up and scares the sh!t out of me all at the same time...

https://youtu.be/tFY-VaxzvME

Let me expand. The exercises the guy suggests are valid, no doubt, but he's talking to an audience of 70,518, so far. At 1:50 in, as he cuts to himself riding the course, he starts his narration with, "The Dragon is not the place where you want to hear the boards scrape for the first time. If you're not familiar with that scraping sound, you probably will panic, straighten up the bike and run right off the curve." Who's he teaching and are their skills truly as lacking as he makes them out to be? That's spooky but I'm sorry, it makes me laugh, too.
 
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I take your meaning, but what this guy teaches is important, albeit hyped. So very few bikers know how to handle the line properly. I want to be reminded myself periodically.

I've watched all(ish) of his stuff. It comes down to four things; clutch friction point control, back brake feathering, and engine throttle - plus how to hold your posture. I am anal about my slow speed skills; to me it is the hallmark of a skilled biker.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I take your meaning, but what this guy teaches is important, albeit hyped. So very few bikers know how to handle the line properly. I want to be reminded myself periodically.

I've watched all(ish) of his stuff. It comes down to four things; clutch friction point control, back brake feathering, and engine throttle - plus how to hold your posture. I am anal about my slow speed skills; to me it is the hallmark of a skilled biker.
Yes, of course, I agree with everything you're saying and stated, upfront, that what he's teaching is valid but what I'm talking about -- what made me bust out laughing while sitting alone at my computer -- is the way he's talking to a crowd of people who are coming straight at you on the Dragon and other "destination" roads with a skillset so very basic that it's both hilarious and terrifying at the same time. I don't know, maybe I've just got a weird sense of humor but it was funny! Oh, and FWIW, I don't claim to be anything special as far as motorcycling skills are concerned and am always striving to learn more and improve. That said, there's a fairly good sized group of people who, in reality, aren't motorcyclists, at all, but are, rather, wannabe bikers whose real purpose for their bike is to serve as a loud, badazz (to them) fashion accessory. Just my 2¢, of course.
 
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I always fall back on what I was taught when I started road racing many years ago. Most people are not really going too fast to make a curve. To the point made, they panic and focus on the wrong thing. You have to practice looking through the curve where you want to wind up. It needs to become “muscle memory” to do so. Same reason unskilled pilots fly into the side of a mountain. The become fixated on the mountain and not going over it.
 

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Target fixation is common across a lot of sports. One of the most interesting things about pro riders is that commitment to looking where they want to go often means that when they do get off its not as dramatic as it can be when someone becomes fixated on where they are going to leave a stain.
 

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The first bit of riding the road happens at about 3:20. I watched a rider in the left curve, with a reverse slope. The narrator states the rider should be in "the extreme right portion of the curve." Way to leave yourself some leeway. This dumbass will drop off the road if he's just a little hot in the curve.

Guess I'm not in the mood to watch anymore.
 

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Target fixation is common across a lot of sports.
This story was my latest example of what not to do. In the image you see a steel pole; that pole is bent at about five feet up. From the right (out of this perspective) the rest stop entrance is a gentle right-side dog leg. This young man, going at a very high rate of speed, saw that pole and stared at it while he was thinking about his options (all in a split second). Mean while his options vanished.

I cannot comment on this man's actions. I have traveled at that rate; albeit on straight open road with miles of visibility and not decelerating into a rest stop to avoid the police.

I have a [morbid?] way of analyzing crashes, which could conceivably happen to me, and in a way a CSI would look at a crime scene. I feel I do this to take a lesson from the misfortune of another; to make myself a better pilot.

Job one, fly the plane.
 

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I was being a buzz-kill; we're good Brother.

That fellow does a good job of reminding a certain body of riders how to not look like a dork. In the process, he also teaches very important skills [ad nauseam], which I have used myself. I think my only gripe is that I want more.

I want a CA Superbike school, woven into a police skills schools, always open and approachable in a way similar to going to a theme park, or a Richard Petty Experience run. A rider skills Mecca fun run.
 

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I was being a buzz-kill; we're good Brother.

That fellow does a good job of reminding a certain body of riders how to not look like a dork. In the process, he also teaches very important skills [ad nauseam], which I have used myself. I think my only gripe is that I want more.

I want a CA Superbike school, woven into a police skills schools, always open and approachable in a way similar to going to a theme park, or a Richard Petty Experience run. A rider skills Mecca fun run.
If you can convince yourself to go to a California Superbike School and leave your ego at home, then it is certain that you will improve and become a better rider even if your interest is not strafing apexes and being one of the faster riders. The CSS is not at all about being fast and in fact, their mantra is to practice slow (focusing on skills) to later go fast. You'll spend the first few track sessions at every CSS school or camp using only 3rd or 4th gear only and absolutely no brakes - forcing you to ride the track slowly and with lots of margin to work on finding reference points and the line. There's no way you're going to rush into a corner if you're going to get flagged for using the brakes.

Get thee to a CSS date and it'll be the best money you ever spent in motorcycling.
 
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